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Trouble Free Operation At 3.60 GHz

A 4.1 GHz Dual Core at $130 - Can it be True?
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Now, we're slowly working our way into the interesting clock rates, and finally exceeding the performance of the Pentium Extreme Edition 840 CPU, which operates at 3.2 GHz. This CPU costs a little over $1,000 at retail, so we've saved about $870 by using a Pentium D 805 instead. We still require no additional voltage boost at this speed, and the CPU remains stable in performing our benchmarks.

At retail computer outlets, a Pentium EE 840 goes for something north of $1,000.

Naturally, the EE 840 runs with an FSB clock rate that's 20 MHz higher and also offers Hyper Threading. The Pentium D 805 is running at a CPU clock rate that's 200 MHz faster, however, so it has no trouble keeping up.

Overclocking the FSB clock rate to 180 MHz improves memory performance. The highest memory clock at our disposal is 360 MHz, because a maximum memory multiplier of 4.0 translates into DDR2-720. Thus, we improved memory performance by 35 percent, as company to the original memory clock rate.

Now we observe a noticeable increase in power consumption for the entire system. In idle mode, energy use climbs by 33 W; we also measured 204 W of power consumption from the power supply. Under heavy load, power consumption increases by a hefty 101 W. In considering the fact that about 80 percent of this 101 W goes to the CPU, we observe that energy consumption at 3.6 GHz has doubled to 160 W. We find ourselves here running at nearly 30 W above the maximum power class for dual core processors based on this CPU core, according to Intel's specifications.

Summary
  1. A Budget CPU At Top Speeds
  2. A Budget CPU At Top Speeds, Continued
  3. Inside the Pentium D 805
  4. The Secret Of The Multiplier
  5. 133 MHz FSB: Perfect For Overclocking
  6. How Is Breaking The 4 GHz Barrier Possible?
  7. How Is Breaking The 4 GHz Barrier Possible? Continued
  8. How Is Breaking The 4 GHz Barrier Possible? Continued
  9. Three Theories Where The Customer Comes Out Ahead
  10. Which Memory Clock Speed Is Most Suitable?
  11. The Right Chipset
  12. Keeping Cool When Power Consumed Tops 150 Watts at 4.1 GHz
  13. Keeping Cool When Power Consumed Tops 150 Watts at 4.1 GHz, Continued
  14. Power Consumption Levels Top 200 W
  15. Power Consumption Levels Top 200 W, Continued
  16. Energy Saving Functions Lack C1E
  17. Risk-free Overclocking, Including Heat Protection
  18. Ready For The 64 Bit Future
  19. Tom's Hardware Guides Overclocking Diary
  20. 3.33 GHz Remains Stable At Standard Voltage Levels
  21. 3.33 GHz Remains Stable At Standard Voltage Levels, Continued
  22. Trouble Free Operation At 3.60 GHz
  23. At 3.8 GHz Some Minor Voltage Increases Become Necessary
  24. Water Cooling Is Recommended For 4.0 GHz
  25. Water Cooling Is Recommended For 4.0 GHz, Continued
  26. Overclocking To 4.10 GHz Boosts Basic Clock Speed By 54 Percent
  27. Overclocking To 4.10 GHz Boosts Basic Clock Speed By 54 Percent, Continued
  28. Will The System Boot At 4.3 GHz?
  29. Benchmark Results Show Performance Increases Of Up To 54 Percent
  30. 3D, Continued
  31. 3D, Continued
  32. Video Editing / Video Encoding
  33. Video, Continued
  34. Video, Continued
  35. Audio Encoding
  36. Office Applications
  37. Office Applications, Continued
  38. Parallel Applications - Multitasking
  39. Synthetic Benchmarks
  40. Synthetic Benchmarks, Continued
  41. Synthetic Benchmarks, Continued
  42. Synthetic Benchmarks, Continued
  43. Summary Overview: Who's The Winner?
  44. Conclusion: The 4.1 GHz Dual Core Delivers Peak Performance For Pocket Change
  45. Conclusion, Continued
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