EVGA SuperNOVA 850 P2 Power Supply Review

EVGA recently enriched its P2 line with three new members, featuring 650W, 750W and 850W capacities. All three, like the other P2 models, are made by Super Flower and feature Platinum efficiency. Today we're testing the 850 P2.

EVGA's second-best power supply family is called P2, and it includes six PSUs with capacities ranging from 650W to 1600W. All six models address enthusiasts who don't mind paying a little more for an 80 Plus Platinum-certified PSU. Like most high-end EVGA PSUs, the P2s are based on Super Flower's Leadex platform, so we expect them to offer high performance.

In today's review, the 850 P2 will have to contend with our Chroma load testers. This is an ideal PSU for a system with two graphics cards, so long as they don't need more than 300W of power each. It will easily support a couple of GeForce GTX 980 Tis, along with a potent CPU. Besides Platinum efficiency, the 850 P2 also features fully modular cabling and a semi-passive mode that can be turned off. Additionally, EVGA backs its product up with a 10-year warranty, which is the longest you'll find covering a PSU.

Without a doubt, this P2 model has excellent specifications, and given our experience with its smaller sibling, the 650 P2, we're pretty sure it will perform well.

Another one of this platform's strengths is its low noise output, even under tough conditions. If you have the ECO (semi-passive) mode enabled, then you won't hear a thing under light and moderate loads. The Japanese caps are a strong asset to this unit's features, since they imbue the design with higher reliability. Electrolytic capacitors that don't use high-quality electrolyte might register good performance initially, but after a short time their performance drops, negatively affecting ripple filtering. Japanese caps typically use high-quality electrolyte, so they age more slowly than Taiwanese and Chinese caps.

Specifications

As mentioned, this PSU features Platinum efficiency and modular cabling. In addition, it can deliver its full power continuously at up to 50 °C, so it can handle tough conditions without faltering. We did notice that over-temperature protection is missing, though. This is an important feature that shouldn't be absent, especially in a high-end PSU with a semi-passive mode. A double ball-bearing fan kicks in when active cooling becomes necessary. Finally, the 850 P2's dimensions are quite compact for an 850W PSU, so you won't have compatibility problems with any normal ATX case.

Power Specifications

Rail3.3V5V12V5VSB-12V
Max. PowerAmps202070.82.50.5
Watts100849.612.56
Total Max. Power (W)850

The minor rails are on the weak side; they can deliver only 100W max combined power. Still, that should suffice for any modern system. We would like to see a stronger 5VSB rail with at least 3A maximum current output. The +12V rail, which is what matters the most, can deliver the PSU's full power on its own, as is the case on all units that feature DC-DC converters for generating the minor rails.

Cables And Connectors

Modular Cables
DescriptionCable CountConnector Count (Total)
ATX connector 20+4 pin (600mm)11
4+4 pin EPS12V (700mm)22
6+2 pin PCIe (700mm)22
6+2 pin PCIe (700mm) / Six-pin PCIe (+150mm)22 / 2
SATA (550mm+100mm+100mm)26
SATA (550mm+100mm+100mm+100mm)14
Four-pin Molex (550mm+100mm+100mm+100mm)14
FDD Adapter (+100mm)11

The PSU is equipped with two EPS and six PCIe connectors (two of which are six-pin connectors; the rest are 6+2-pin). Since this is a higher-capacity PSU, we'd like to see all of the PCIe connectors with 6+2 pins. It seems that EVGA didn't want any problems in case someone tried to drive three Tahiti- or Fiji-based Radeon cards with this supply. Taking into account that a stock R9 290 4GB consumes up to 320W in a worst-case scenario, we can understand that sentiment.

The PSU has 10 SATA and four-pin Molex connectors, along with a floppy (Berg) adapter. Cable length is sufficient, and the distance between the SATA connectors seems ideal since hard drives are usually installed close to each other. On the other hand, the distance between four-pin Molex connectors should be at least 13-15cm, since peripheral devices like case fans are typically farther apart. In order to lower voltage drops, EVGA equips the 24-pin ATX, EPS and PCIe connectors with thicker, 16-gauge wires, while the other connectors use standard 18-gauge wires.

Power Distribution

Since this PSU features a single +12V rail, we do not have anything to say about its power distribution.

MORE: Best Power Supplies
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MORE: How We Test Power Supplies
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17 comments
    Your comment
  • QuangT
    Why can't US use 220v, man so much more efficient.
    2
  • JQB45
    Quote:
    Why can't US use 220v, man so much more efficient.

    Tradition... There is nothing (I believe) stopping you from running a 220v circuit. I know we have one 20amp NEMA circuit in this house specificity for the computer room. Its not common to see those in house holds either.
    1
  • JQB45
    Tier-1 but on the low end of Tier-1 due to its hold up time.
    0
  • cliffro
    Anonymous said:
    Tier-1 but on the low end of Tier-1 due to its hold up time.


    Scores a 9.7 on Jonnyguru, but is low end of tier 1 got it.


    I like Tom's in general, been coming here since Tom was actually doing reviews, but I'll take JonnyGuru's(or Oklahoma Wolf) word that this is an awesome PSU, it scored 10 of 10's in all but Value, where a couple of similar quality PSU were a tad cheaper.

    I've got the G2 model(thanks to their review of it) and couldn't be happier with it. Well other than they now have Platinum and Titanium versions and would prefer one of those. But 80+ Gold is still good enough for me.
    1
  • powernod
    Quote:
    Anonymous said:
    Tier-1 but on the low end of Tier-1 due to its hold up time.


    Scores a 9.7 on Jonnyguru, but is low end of tier 1 got it.


    I like Tom's in general, been coming here since Tom was actually doing reviews, but I'll take JonnyGuru's(or Oklahoma Wolf) word that this is an awesome PSU, it scored 10 of 10's in all but Value, where a couple of similar quality PSU were a tad cheaper.

    I've got the G2 model(thanks to their review of it) and couldn't be happier with it. Well other than they now have Platinum and Titanium versions and would prefer one of those. But 80+ Gold is still good enough for me.


    Well, i think that you don't pay that much attention to Jonnyguru.com, as much as you claim.
    Look here, at Jonny's tier list, and notice what tier is the EVGA's P2 line :
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12947
    0
  • dstarr3
    Quote:
    Why can't US use 220v, man so much more efficient.


    The same reason so many regions have different plug types. They all designed these things before anyone had the idea to standardize these things across regions, and by now it's an incredible amount of work to have to redesign the infrastructure of entire countries.
    0
  • Adhmuz
    Quote:
    Why can't US use 220v, man so much more efficient.

    "Technology, current at the time of US electrification, locked the US into 110, then 120 volt outlets. Europe's electrification came later, and proceeded in response to advanced technology. The US was too deep into the 110/120 volt infrastructure to upgrade."
    Gotta hand it to the Americans for inventing the concept of the grid and power distribution to the masses, they did it first, and Edison's equipment at the time ran best on 110v so it was the obvious choice. Currently it's at 120v, this was changed in the 50s. Don't forget houses are supplied with 240v, this is what runs our hot water heaters, ovens and air conditioners. Just the old way is still too set in stone to be changed, not to mention 120v is safer for human exposure (a shock from a 120v outlet is much less dangerous than that of a 240v outlet, having experienced the 120v shock I can't imagine how painful a 240v would be)
    3
  • 10tacle
    Anonymous said:
    Just the old way is still too set in stone to be changed, not to mention 120v is safer for human exposure (a shock from a 120v outlet is much less dangerous than that of a 240v outlet, having experienced the 120v shock I can't imagine how painful a 240v would be)


    Yep...I was popped by a 220v 3-prong washing machine plug wire that arced some two decades ago (when it was still known as a 220v power connection) and it knocked me on my butt. It makes getting hit by 120v (used to be 110v), which I've also experienced more recently, seem like carpet static electricity.
    1
  • cliffro
    Anonymous said:
    Quote:
    Anonymous said:
    Tier-1 but on the low end of Tier-1 due to its hold up time.


    Scores a 9.7 on Jonnyguru, but is low end of tier 1 got it.


    I like Tom's in general, been coming here since Tom was actually doing reviews, but I'll take JonnyGuru's(or Oklahoma Wolf) word that this is an awesome PSU, it scored 10 of 10's in all but Value, where a couple of similar quality PSU were a tad cheaper.

    I've got the G2 model(thanks to their review of it) and couldn't be happier with it. Well other than they now have Platinum and Titanium versions and would prefer one of those. But 80+ Gold is still good enough for me.


    Well, i think that you don't pay that much attention to Jonnyguru.com, as much as you claim.
    Look here, at Jonny's tier list, and notice what tier is the EVGA's P2 line :
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12947


    This is the summary for my EVGA 850 G2 (Tier 2 according to his list, a WIP according to the post)
    Quote:
    Performance
    10
    Functionality
    10
    Value
    10
    Build Quality
    9.5
    Total Score
    9.9

    Summary

    Buy one. Do I really need to say anything else at this point? Once again, EVGA has something awesome here the competition can't seem to touch price wise. Performance? There are better units, yes. Not very many, but they exist. The real story here is how EVGA keeps managing to offer this kind of performance and still be more affordable than nearly everything else out there, and they have pretty much found perhaps the only OEM on Earth capable of doing it for them. It's got to be real nice being EVGA right now.

    The Good:


    The Bad:


    The Mediocre:
    reviewing awesome units is getting dull... where's that gutless wonder in my pile? Second in line? Well, at least I'm guaranteed something interesting in all the wrong ways in a couple weeks...

    It scores a 9.9 of 10, and is somehow a Tier 2 according to that list. I have no clue as to what he is doing with his list on the forums. I cannot explain HOW a unit that scores 9.9 of 10 is anything less than Tier 1. There are some Corsair units that scored perfect 10's that are also listed as Tier 2 on it as well.

    If it's scoring that close to 10, or an actual 10 (his highest score), it's a Tier 1 to me. And I'd never second guess buying one regardless of brand.
    1
  • Amdlova
    you guys cry like a baby. i use 227v on the computer no ground. with a multimeter can see about 45v on chassis its nice to touch it. i use a ps3 power supply to drive a 400w car amplifier and the psu barely get warm, no fan only passive cooler. 127v as no good use anymore on non days.
    0
  • 10tacle
    Anonymous said:
    you guys cry like a baby. i use 227v on the computer no ground. with a multimeter can see about 45v on chassis its nice to touch it. i use a ps3 power supply to drive a 400w car amplifier and the psu barely get warm, no fan only passive cooler. 127v as no good use anymore on non days.


    LOL. Come on over to my house and I'll show you the difference in 240v and 120v when you touch them. But I will need a liability waiver signed.
    1
  • powernod
    Quote:

    This is the summary for my EVGA 850 G2 (Tier 2 according to his list, a WIP according to the post)
    .
    .
    .

    It scores a 9.9 of 10, and is somehow a Tier 2 according to that list. I have no clue as to what he is doing with his list on the forums. I cannot explain HOW a unit that scores 9.9 of 10 is anything less than Tier 1. There are some Corsair units that scored perfect 10's that are also listed as Tier 2 on it as well.


    That's because the reviews that you refer to, are Jeremy's (Oklahoma Wolf), while the Tier list is Jonny's.
    So as you can see there is some difference of opinions.
    2
  • Aris_Mp
    both 115V and 230V can kill! Also it doesn't have to do only with the voltage but with the current and with 115V the amount of current is increased!
    4
  • Virtual_Singularity
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Anonymous said:
    Tier-1 but on the low end of Tier-1 due to its hold up time.


    Scores a 9.7 on Jonnyguru, but is low end of tier 1 got it.


    I like Tom's in general, been coming here since Tom was actually doing reviews, but I'll take JonnyGuru's(or Oklahoma Wolf) word that this is an awesome PSU, it scored 10 of 10's in all but Value, where a couple of similar quality PSU were a tad cheaper.

    I've got the G2 model(thanks to their review of it) and couldn't be happier with it. Well other than they now have Platinum and Titanium versions and would prefer one of those. But 80+ Gold is still good enough for me.


    Well, i think that you don't pay that much attention to Jonnyguru.com, as much as you claim.
    Look here, at Jonny's tier list, and notice what tier is the EVGA's P2 line :
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12947


    Methinks one has to take that list with a grain of salt, most especially where Evga P2 and above are concerned. A lot of ppl on the thread were a tad confused at how some units were placed in T1 and others in T2. Halfway through the thread the author of the list says he'll likely merge Tiers 1 & 2 at some point in the future.

    However... If I thought Superflower's leadex platform was somehow inferior to Seasonic's equivalent, I would've reconsidered when i got the 1kw Evga P2 for my own sys. The price difference isn't significant, especially if one takes sales into account. Even the usually $60+ more expensive Antec HCP 1kw Platinum was competitively priced for a bit on Newegg around the holidays iirc. I can't imagine seeing the titanium 1kw model [Evga T2] placed in Tier 2, either. Even according to some of the site's own reviews, some of the tier placings simply don't make much sense.

    Others, that showed the most promise, namely Andyson's titanium offerrings, haven't been mentioned in said list yet. This may be due to Andyson still not having inked out a contract with a brand name for N.A./E.U. yet (any clarification would be appreciated re Andyson btw).
    1
  • Virtual_Singularity
    nm, fixed it
    1
  • powernod

    1)Methinks one has to take that list with a grain of salt, most especially where Evga P2 and above are concerned. A lot of ppl on the thread were a tad confused at how some units were placed in T1 and others in T2. Halfway through the thread the author of the list says he'll likely merge Tiers 1 & 2 at some point in the future.
    2)However... If I thought Superflower's leadex platform was somehow inferior to Seasonic's equivalent, I would've reconsidered when i got the 1kw Evga P2 for my own sys.
    3)Even according to some of the site's own reviews, some of the tier placings simply don't make much sense.


    1) I was also one of the persons who were confused, but because someone gets confused doesn't mean that the list is wrong!!
    2)What do you mean by that? That according to your opinion, your EVGA P2 belongs to Tier1? I also own an EVGA G2 750 & 850. Surely i would like to see them as a Tier1 units . So what? Do you or i, have higher expertise than Jonny on the PSU field? !!!!
    3) Jeremy & Jonny are both reviewers and used to work for the same site, but that doesn't make them identical twins!!, who are thinking exactly the same!! Apparently, according to his list, Jonny thinks as a Tier1 only OEMS like Delta, Seasonic and Flextronics, and the other OEMS are one step down. Lots of people probably will get confused, but the fact is that very few people have Jonny's expertise in the PSU field.
    1
  • Virtual_Singularity
    "1) I was also one of the persons who were confused, but because someone gets confused doesn't mean that the list is wrong!!"

    True. However, does it necessarily mean the list is by any means complete yet, and thus definitely "right"? To the point some odd and conflicting placements between tiers 1 and 2, have begun to be explained with any degree of satisfaction? If some placements remain as they are presently, I'd wish to know why. Especially given the discrepancies between some units' ultimate scoring and their list placement, (including the site's own reviews, regardless of author), noticed by some of the site's faithful readers.



    "2)What do you mean by that? That according to your opinion, your EVGA P2 belongs to Tier1? I also own an EVGA G2 750 & 850. Surely i would like to see them as a Tier1 units . So what? Do you or i, have higher expertise than Jonny on the PSU field? !!!!"

    Speaking for myself, I'd say no. Allow me to put it another way: If, after the considerable research I did, taking the reviews from JohnnyGuru and other sites into consideration, I thought Seasonic's 1kw platinum equivalent (or the others for that matter) held a considerable, tangible, qualitative advantage over the Evga 1kw P2, I would've gotten it or something else over the Evga P2. And just fwiw, I'm not attached as a fan to this or any other particular company. I chose a Nitro r9 390 for a gpu, where most would've surely chosen an nvidia instead. Why? Well, aside from the fact if we find ourselves subject to a total intel/nvidia monopoly in the near future, we'll have no one but ourselves to blame, it's actually an excellent card for the money, a great wqhd card as it turns out, with overall excellent build quality. Sry to get off track, just wanted to make that point.

    Anyhow... The PSU list is a work in progress, which is prone to some changes and editing. According to Jonny's own post on that site's forum, on p5 of that thread he states: "Yeah, I plan to consolidate a bit. Like merge 1 and 2, for example."


    "3) Jeremy & Jonny are both reviewers and used to work for the same site, but that doesn't make them identical twins!!, who are thinking exactly the same!! Apparently, according to his list, Jonny thinks as a Tier1 only OEMS like Delta, Seasonic and Flextronics, and the other OEMS are one step down. Lots of people probably will get confused, but the fact is that very few people have Jonny's expertise in the PSU field."

    I agree, I'm curious to see what the list looks like when done.
    1