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Four 10-Slot Cases For Four-Way SLI, Tested And Reviewed

Four 10-Slot Cases For Four-Way SLI, Tested And Reviewed
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Extra space for cooling, controllers, and add-in cards makes XL-ATX the preferred solution for extreme system builders. Today, we follow up our picture story by testing four 10-slot cases that support XL-ATX and four-way SLI (with room to spare).

When it comes to systems with four dual-slot graphics cards, XL-ATX and ATX motherboards typically wind up with the same issue: due to the thickness of graphics coolers, they both require one more slot at the bottom. Further complicating matters is the fact that XL-ATX isn’t actually a standard form factor.

A motherboard form factor is a fixed set of dimensional values that define its size and standoff locations. No single manufacturer has yet been able to do that with XL-ATX. The problem is that competing vendors specify their own versions of XL-ATX at eight or nine slot spaces in length, various widths, and differing amounts of overhang past the standoffs. With no official template from which to operate, we’re fortunate to find that Evga, Gigabyte, and MSI at least use the same mounting points for the added (fourth) row of standoffs near the bottom edge of these oversized motherboards.

Ultra ATX, on the other hand, is a standard. It was defined by one company on a single product that never actually went into production. Companies began making cases for this motherboard before discovering that it wouldn’t be produced, and those cases are either still being offered today or were replaced by similar models built to support the same standard. The great feature of Ultra ATX is that it supports a double-slot graphics cards mounted in an XL-ATX motherboard’s bottom slot.

This means that, regardless of which XL-ATX motherboard you buy, an Ultra ATX-based case is almost certainly the ideal chassis in which to put it. Even extra-long HPTX cases are designed with the extra slot specified by Ultra ATX.

Ten-Slot Case Features
 Azza
Fusion 4000
Enermax
Fulmo GT
Rosewill
Thor V2 White
Thermaltake
VH6000BWS
Dimensions
Height31"25.2"23.5"23.8"
Width10.1"9.5"9.7"9.6"
Depth24.8"26.0"22.4"25.0"
Space Above
Motherboard
2.0"3.0"0.7"0.5"
Card Length14.5"16.8"13.1"14.1"
Weight42.3 pounds23.4 pounds30.9 pounds36.9 pounds
Cooling
Front Fans
(alternatives)
2 x 120 mm
(None)
1 x 180 mm
(2 x 140/120 mm)
1 x 230 mm
(1 x 140/120 mm)
1 x 140 mm
(1 x 120 mm)
Rear Fans
(alternatives)
1 x 140 mm
(None)
1 x 140 mm
(1 x 120 mm)
1 x 140 mm
(1 x 120 mm)
1 x 120 mm
(None)
Top Fans
(alternatives)
None
(4 x 120 mm)
1 x 230 mm (2 x 230 mm, 3 x 140/120 mm)1 x 230 mm
(2 x 140/120 mm)
None
(1 x 140/120 mm)
Side Fans
(alternatives)
None (1 x 180 mm,
2 x 140/120 mm)
2 x 180 mm
(4 x 180 mm)
1 x 230 mm
(4 x 120 mm)
1 x 230 mm
(None)
Drive Bays
5.25" ExternalSixFourSixSeven
3.5" ExternalNoneNone1 x Adapter1 x Adapter
3.5" Internal8 x Backplane
 2 x Cage
TenSixFive +Two**
2.5" Internal4 x Backplane
8 x Shared*
TenSix*None
Card SlotsTenTenTenTen
Price$230 $230 $170 $180
*shared on 3.5" tray, **XL-ATX motherboard requires removal of two 3.5" drive cages


We’ve already gone into quite a bit of depth on the added features, so today we finally get to see how well each case fits and functions with our quad-card SLI configuration on an XL-ATX-based board.

Display 41 Comments.
  • 1 Hide
    tarekwm , November 18, 2011 4:24 AM
    4 way sli is too damn excessive! but anyway nice builds
  • 1 Hide
    metallifux , November 18, 2011 4:39 AM
    The enermax looks like a carbon copy of the CoolerMaster CM 690 II Advanced
  • 0 Hide
    de5_Roy , November 18, 2011 5:23 AM
    damn those cases look huge, in a good way.
    i am pretty sure i could live in the top apartment compartment of the azza case. it has in built cooling, water supply if one is using water cooling, a bottom grill window and so on. ;D
  • 8 Hide
    joytech22 , November 18, 2011 6:01 AM
    I just wish I could find the Azza Fusion 4000. >:\

    I could really take advantage of the dual mobo feature.
    Just stick a i5-i7 Mini-ITX system in the top for thin clients, servers for gaming at lans etc..

    Then use the more powerful bottom system with a KVM switch and use whichever you want for whatever task you intend to perform. :) 

    That's what I would do anyway.. I might get thumbed down but that's my use.
  • 0 Hide
    pro-gamer , November 18, 2011 6:25 AM
    wow!!! azza 4000 is best solution for four way sli/cfx
  • 9 Hide
    ksampanna , November 18, 2011 6:32 AM
    I know it's not a cpu/graphic card review, but come on ... 980X & 4 580s beg for performance numbers
  • 4 Hide
    Dacatak , November 18, 2011 6:38 AM
    I would also love to see some benchmarks for those four 580s.
  • -1 Hide
    DRosencraft , November 18, 2011 6:49 AM
    Does anyone actually know a place in the US you can get the Azza? I can't seem to find one.
  • 0 Hide
    buzznut , November 18, 2011 7:03 AM
    I think the Enermax case is really sharp. The Thor isn't bad looking but the Armor is god awful. I don't like the aesthetics of the Azza case, but I bet the top portion could be put to use as a housing for a pretty wicked water cooling setup! That's what I'd do anyway.
  • -6 Hide
    Anonymous , November 18, 2011 7:49 AM
    The toms guys are without ideas. Why not make a competition looking for de pc cheapest-fastest?
    Spaniard
  • 0 Hide
    metallifux , November 18, 2011 8:01 AM
    Quote:
    I think the Enermax case is really sharp. The Thor isn't bad looking but the Armor is god awful. I don't like the aesthetics of the Azza case, but I bet the top portion could be put to use as a housing for a pretty wicked water cooling setup! That's what I'd do anyway.


    carbon copy of the CoolerMaster CM 690 II Advanced

    http://www.pccasegear.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=18722
  • 2 Hide
    Crashman , November 18, 2011 8:07 AM
    metallifuxThe enermax looks like a carbon copy of the CoolerMaster CM 690 II Advanced
    Only the looks
    metallifuxcarbon copy of the CoolerMaster CM 690 II Advanced http://www.pccasegear.com/index.ph [...] s_id=18722
    Great, I'd love to see you put two power supplies and a 9-10 slot configuration in the 8-slot single PSU case!
    SpanihardThe toms guys are without ideas. Why not make a competition looking for de pc cheapest-fastest?Spaniard
    If you'd actually READ any of the previous Tom's Hardware case roundups, you'd know that your suggestion is a rather old idea.
  • 0 Hide
    darkstar845 , November 18, 2011 8:51 AM
    Just a question, can the antec 1200w PSU handle all four GTX 580 at full load?
  • -1 Hide
    joytech22 , November 18, 2011 9:54 AM
    darkstar845Just a question, can the antec 1200w PSU handle all four GTX 580 at full load?


    I'm pretty sure it would.
    They would draw maybe 200-250W each?
  • 0 Hide
    blibba , November 18, 2011 12:51 PM
    Can we get some full load temps on the quad SLI?
  • -1 Hide
    CaedenV , November 18, 2011 1:16 PM
    darkstar845Just a question, can the antec 1200w PSU handle all four GTX 580 at full load?

    200W for CPU, mobo, ram, HDD and fans, which should be enough for a good build, but not enough for a large RAID array or anything

    Rally Toms? No performance charts for Quad SLI? And what about running Quad SLI on a new SB-E with all of those beautiful PCIe Lanes to spare! Nothing would make my day quite like seeing how sadly my single 570 stacks up to 4X580 lol.

    Also, as I said in the initial case review; those are all beautiful cases except for the Thermaltake... just what where they thinking?
  • -1 Hide
    CaedenV , November 18, 2011 1:18 PM
    LOL, I guess I should not have used the less than and more than signs in my post above! I meant to say that the 580's take a little less than 250W, meaning you have roughly 1000W for graphics, leaving 200W for the rest of the system
  • 0 Hide
    lockhrt999 , November 18, 2011 2:09 PM
    metallifuxcarbon copy of the CoolerMaster CM 690 II Advanced http://www.pccasegear.com/index.ph [...] s_id=18722


    I was going to say the same thing.
  • -4 Hide
    spookyman , November 18, 2011 2:19 PM
    Why would I spend $1000 for an old processor?

    How about seeing the Sandy Bridge-E setup? That would seem more appropriate for a modern quad sli set up.
  • 0 Hide
    upgrade_1977 , November 18, 2011 2:29 PM
    Bought the 10-slot Armor+ last year & been loving it ever since. Best case I ever had. I want to get another one for my next build.

    PROS: Things I do love about this case:
    1. It's built solid
    2. Plenty of room, easy to build in (it's huge!!)
    3. Love how the door open's, so easy, works flawless
    4. wanted 10 slot case for future upgrades
    5. vents in the front keep out the dust very well, and easy to clean
    6. PSU support bar so PSU doesn't flex your case (not that it would, thick metal)
    7. plenty of storage (drawer on top, and in front, + I added one)
    8. Love the usb ports, power (reset is too small) on top, perfect place, easy to access.
    9. ect. ect. ect.

    CONS: There are a few things about it that I don't like:
    1. The side window, I prefer a plain window so I can see inside.
    2. Don't like the card latches, pulled mine off.
    3. Wish there were more holes in the m.b. tray for cpu backplate and wire routing.
    4. Would have been nice to have Watercooling slots near the bottom (i drilled mine)

    But these are only negatives for me, other people might like these features.

    Again, this is the best case i've ever had. And I am planning on getting another one. My next build I am gonna take my time building, and I'm planning on modding the crap out of this case. Just waiting till tax time to roll around again. Anyways, anyone interested here is a video of my system and my gaming room. :) 

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-zfs97z5zOk
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