Gigabyte Aivia Uranium Wireless Gaming Mouse Review

A Unique Mouse For Low- And Medium-Sensitivity Gamers

An Award-Worthy Offering from Gigabyte

Paying $120 dollars is a lot for a mouse. But the price tag looks more reasonable when you take the Aivia Uranium’s feature set and accessories into account. It’s really a pretty good deal compared to the direct competition, particularly since the peripheral is technically quite solid. Then there's the charging station to consider, which is unique, nicely executed, and certainly adds some value.

Given the package as a whole, we're satisfied with the performance Gigabyte delivers for what it charges. An integrated Philips sensor, which does its job effectively, makes this mouse a good option for low- and medium-sensitivity gamers who won’t be bothered by its extra heft. If you like a more solid-feeling mouse, the Aivia Uranium is that to a tee.

The Aivia Uranium features good ergonomics, providing your hand is large enough, and the feel of the mouse harmonizes with its clean and appealing design. Three things about this component really stood out for us when we asked ourselves if it deserves award recognition, despite of the mouse wheel's rather lackluster feedback.

First, it’s nice to have the option of using your own rechargeable batteries, if you want. Second, the charging station and its display are practical. Third, the software is both mature and stable, despite its youth. It includes an automatic update function that makes searching on Gigabyte's website for a new version a practice of the past. There are a lot of small things the company does right, without introducing any major problems.

If you're looking for a heavier wireless mouse that fits well into larger hands, Gigabyte's Aivia Uranium is certainly a contender. Compared to Razer’s mice, some of which have used or are still using the same sensor, it's particularly nice that you don't have to register your information with Gigabyte. That extra nod to privacy, which we shouldn't have to take for granted, is appreciated.

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  • jankeke
    Nice review !But on the 2nd page, 9th § you wrote :This is another place where Gigabyte's Aivia Uranium offers good economics.I guess it should say :This is another place where Gigabyte's Aivia Uranium offers good ergonomics.
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  • FormatC
    Typical translation mistake.... Thx. I'll inform the guys to fix this asap. :)
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  • kamhagh
    in My option, this is stupid !
    -1
  • Yuka
    Philips PLN 2032 Twin-Eye Laser.Do not buy.Cheers!
    -1
  • kamhagh
    i would rather buy g602 (have it currently and love it) G600 or g700s! maybe g100 or g500s depends on need :)
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  • Boo Bies
    120 for a mouse? No thanks
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  • Phillip Wager
    this just does not seem worth the high price. it just seems like too much of an office mouse than a gaming mouse honestly thats marketed for gamers.
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  • ferooxidan
    Using Microsoft Mouse wireless 4000 and still owning Dota 2 nicely. Cheers
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  • atavax
    I don't understand why you think heavy is ok for low sensitivity and bad for high sensitivity. It is quite the opposite. Low sensitivity means you are moving your mouse way more and lifting your mouse way more, which means heft is a big problem. While many high sensitivity players move their mouse very little and many actually prefer heavy mice.
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  • atavax
    Also many low sensitivity players use 400 or 450 dpi. the lowest native step being 800 is not good for low sensitivity players.5600 DPI is ridiculously high. Almost all professional shooter players use below 1000 dpi. The higher the max dpi, the more smoothing is needed to be built into the mouse to counter jitter, the laggier the mouse is. Any mouse above 3,000 dpi is not taking high level mouse performance seriously.
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