HTC One (M8) And One (E8) Review: A Flagship And Its Sidekick

Camera Features And Example Photos

Before we test camera performance on the HTC One (M8) and (E8), consider the company's previous-generation product. Last year, HTC went a unique direction with the One (M7)'s camera. Instead of making its focus larger sensors, light-gathering and fast response time were prioritized instead. A photographer will tell you that those both needed more work in the mobile space, and HTC's UltraPixel camera consequently did a solid job capturing photos. I tend to agree that this is the right direction to take customers.

Now, what changed with the M8? The rear-facing camera carries over the same UltraPixel hardware from last year's M7, leveraging a 4 MP sensor. It has the same light-gathering ability (thanks to a large f/2.0 aperture) and fast response time (attributable to fewer, larger 2.0 micrometer pixels). So, its basic strengths and weaknesses don't change. 

To that platform, HTC adds a second rear-facing 2.1 MP sensor to capture depth data. This is actually the front-facing camera from last generation's One (M7). Together, both sensors enable HTC's UFocus feature, which lets you alter bokeh after a picture is taken. I adjusted the effect in the images below; the shots that follow reflect UFocus applied to foreground, mid-range, and long-range objects:

UFocus is a practical capability able to add drama to any image you may want to adjust later, and the phone processes the effect almost instantaneously. Notable limitations apply, though. It can't be used in low-light conditions. It doesn't work in conjunction with the flash. And it isn't usable with HDR enabled. At least for me, this isn't a must-have feature. But there will be those who discover it, play around with it, and spend time getting more artistic about the way they shoot pictures. An amateur at a wedding might have fun setting up cool shots, for example.

As for the lower-priced One (E8), it sports one 13 MP sensor instead, so UFocus isn't available. The E8 employs a single LED, rather than the M8's dual-LED flash, and the camera's response time is slower than HTC's flagship, too. Still, it's in line with what we've come to expect from smartphones. If you covet high-resolution shots, it might even be preferable.

The One (M8) and (E8) share the same 5 MP front-facing camera, offering more than twice the resolution as last year's HTC One (M7).

HTC streamlines the One's Camera app to further drive home its speed-of-service directive. Open it and you're presented with a simple screen highlighting the button used to capture pictures, another button for picking a camera mode, flash status, and a settings option.

Press the mode button, and you're able to choose between the standard camera, Video, Zoe camera, Selfie, capture from the front and rear cameras, and a Pan 360 option. Only the Zoe camera (short for zoetrope) necessitates explanation: it lets you shoot 3.6 seconds of video or 20 photos at six frames per second from the same interface. Zoom is disabled in this mode. However, HTC claims the result is a more complete memory than just capturing stills.

You can assign zoom functionality to the volume rocker buttons, or you can use them for taking pictures. The settings are accessible once you dig deeper into the normal camera mode, where you'll find a plethora of scene options, including HDR. There's even a manual mode for the enthusiasts who place value on dialing settings in as precisely as possible.

I took some comparison pictures with the One (M8), and really appreciated its fast response time and strong low-light performance. The camera does have a tendency to bias toward overexposure, though. Let's compare the device's quality compared to Nokia's Lumia Icon/930.

HTC One M8HTC One M8Nokia Lumia IconNokia Lumia Icon

The first shot tests low-light response. HTC's One (M8) gives us a brighter image, while the Lumia delivers finer detail.

HTC One M8HTC One M8Nokia Lumia IconNokia Lumia Icon

With their flashes enabled, both cameras fare much better. The Lumia again facilitates crisper detail at a warmer color temperature, while the One (M8) tends toward green.

HTC One M8HTC One M8

Nokia Lumia IconNokia Lumia Icon

Shooting another poorly-lit subject, HTC's One (M8) outputs a darker image compared to the Lumia Icon/930, which, again, better reproduces fine detail.

HTC One M8HTC One M8

The One (M8) lacks vibrancy in the above comparison.

HTC One M8HTC One M8

Nokia Lumia IconNokia Lumia Icon

Shooting outdoors on a cloudy day exposes lots of difference between these two devices. At least to my eye, the Lumia wins, capturing more detail (best seen when you blow the image up), whereas the One (M8) appears muted and under-saturated.

HTC One M8HTC One M8

Nokia Lumia IconNokia Lumia Icon

Although the One (M8) shows off its light-gathering abilities in this nighttime shot, it also suffers from more noise, less detail, and a yellow tint compared to the Lumia Icon's version. What you can't see in these examples is how quickly each camera works. The One (M8) is simply faster than Nokia's offering, imparting more confidence that we'd be able to capture a brief moment. It's an important consideration that detracts from many otherwise-strong smartphone cameras.

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  • Heironious
    The pricing says 1,309.00 for it on Amazon? May as well buy it straight from an authorized dealer for half that. It's a gorgeous phone and I don't regret picking it up over the Samsung S5 (mostly because of the cheap plastic of Samsung).
    1
  • LordConrad
    I love my M8 except for that stupid depth-camera, they should remove it and bring back OIS.
    -1
  • blackmagnum
    HTC M8 versus Samsung S5. No contest!
    -1
  • JOSHSKORN
    Just stop comparing to the iPhone 5s until a comparable 64-bit chip is released and implemented into Android phones. Until then, the iPhone 5s "appears to be faster" (only on benchmarks) but as many of us know, it justifies buying an iPhone for most users, even though a 64-bit processor in a mobile phone may be pointless (for now).
    1
  • kevith
    What is the price of E8? All over the article it says 699$, more than the M8 at 659.
    1
  • CaedenV
    If I were the android type I would get this phone hands-down. If they released a WP version then I would jump all over it over the stuff Nokia has been pushing out in 2014 so far.

    The only 'complaints' that I have are the lack of wireless charging (impossible due to the metal back plate right?), and the lack of a sort of Nokia Glance screen (though other android devices are picking up similar features). The cover seems to bring that Glance functionality... but I really don't like that cover and would rather not. The thing is that with my lowly 920 I have built myself an upright wireless charging stand, and with glance screen enabled whenever the device has access to power, it makes a most excellent clock/notification center. With my 920 approaching 2 years old I am starting to look for a replacement, and as of the moment I am not finding one. WP has seemingly abandoned the high end devices, I am not apple compatible, and Android devices have a lot of really neat features... but then you deal with non-standard UIs and gimmickey software. I really hope something really good comes out before Christmas because the 920 is not getting any younger.
    0
  • stevessvt
    Wow, these benchmarks are, by far, the lowest I have seen for the M8. 27K in Antutu? Was power saver on?
    1
  • Avus
    Holy!! $1300 for a phone.... I am too cheap for that...

    I am currently using Nexus 5 and happy with it. If I want to buy a phone now, I may want to get an Oneplus One.
    1
  • envy14tpe
    Great phone but that camera is what holds me back from buying it. So Samsung or Google gets my money, although Apple has the best camera. (However, no Apple..screen wayyy to small...Android flagship phones have been over 4" for 2+ years)
    0
  • TeKEffect
    Me and my friend are both having problems with the usb port. They went cheap on the cheapest part. I would google the problem before getting the one.
    0
  • Merry_Blind
    The E8 looks like a great phone for a great price! Can't wait to see the next Nexus phone though. The 5 was definitely best price to performance ratio. If I ever upgrade to a proper smartphone, it will probably be a Nexus, unless they somehow become garbage.
    0
  • PapaCrazy
    I love my One M8. I've had iPhones and Samsungs before. It's hard to explain why this phone is so enjoyable, it really is more than the sum of its parts. Slick UI even better than stock Android, insanely quick in day to day tasks, design features that genuinely make the phone easier to use like tap-to-wake, beautiful audio quality that can even drive my 600ohm(!) headphones to respectable volumes... I actually was planning on getting a Samsung G5 but with the lack of 32gb went with the HTC instead. I had no idea the HTC One was so awesome when I bought it, but glad I did. Next time around I will be looking at HTC first thing.
    1
  • dovah-chan
    oh yeah forgot to say that the futuremark benchmarks are invalid as HTC cheated on those for specifically optimizing for them
    0
  • PapaCrazy
    Quote:
    oh yeah forgot to say that the futuremark benchmarks are invalid as HTC cheated on those for specifically optimizing for them


    Not to make excuses for HTC, but the "high performance CPU mode" that becomes unlocked on those tests was made a public feature to downplay the fact that they cheated. So now you can goto Developer Options and enable it yourself 24/7 (with added battery drain). As an overclocker, I find it a cute novelty, but not much more. It's a tangible user benefit to the cheating, though not an excuse for such tactics in benchmarks.
    0
  • Thor God Of Thunder
    HTC makes excellent phones.
    1
  • doogansquest
    Apple's GPU scores aren't exactly accurate. I mean, they have to produce less information in their much lower resolution screens.

    Got to give it to them on their web browsing experience though. They've always been pretty good there. Still the most over-priced-per-performance piece of marketing-to-the-sheep garbage out there.
    1
  • CaedenV
    Woo Hoo! Confirmed yesterday that the HTC One (M8) is going to have a WP version! Sadly it will be tied to VZW, but perhaps there will be an international version that would play nice on ATT or T-Mo network? Still, this looks to be a much better offering than the Lumia 930, cant wait to see a release date and if they are going to mess with the hardware or housing for the WP variant.
    1
  • stealthgamer
    Great value for money phone is Xiaomi Mi3..........
    http://www.techtomorrow.in/xiaomi-mi3
    1