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The Infotainment System

2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track: Telematics And Infotainment
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Hyundai sources the 2013 Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track's infotainment system from its sister company, Mobis, formerly known as Hyundai Autonet. As mentioned, this is a completely different component than the Blue Link module.

Texas Instruments' OMAP3530 system-on-chip sits at the heart of Hyundai's infotainment system. This SoC bears family resemblance to the OMAP3430 in Motorola's first-gen Droid. It features a single ARM Cortex-A8 core based on the ARMv7 instruction set, capable of delivering enough performance to drive the system's features. As it sits in the Genesis Coupe 3.8, the OMAP3530 operates at 600 MHz. That's safely below the 720 MHz maximum clock rate specified by Texas Instruments. Unfortunately, there is no way to easily overclock the infotainment system to cut route computation time or improve responsiveness.

Also built in to Texas Instruments SoC is the company's IVA 2+ advanced imaging, video, and audio engine, which handles most of the user interface's video and imaging tasks in hardware. The IVA 2+ engine contains TI's TMS320C64x+ DSP core for MPEG-4, H.264, and VC-1 decode acceleration, though Hyundai's system doesn't expose that functionality.

Another component of the OMAP3530 is a 3D graphics engine supplied by Imagination Technologies. Its PowerVR SGX530 is both potent and feature-rich, including Shader Model 4.1 support. PowerVR SGX5xx-series GPUs are also found on a number of mobile devices in single- and multi-core trim, such as the Galaxy Nexus, Apple iPhone 4, the 4S, iPads, the iPod Touch, Apple TV, and BlackBerry's PlayBook. Sadly, there is no Angry Birds port for the Genesis Coupe.

Perhaps you're wondering why an in-car infotainment system requires 3D graphics hardware powerful enough to play Duke Nukem 3D. The answer is that infotainment system's navigation component employs 3D to process and render map data, delivering smooth turn-by-turn guidance and fluid zooming.

As mentioned, the QNX Neutrino RTOS ties all of the hardware together, and is skinned to match Hyundai’s white and blue interior lighting scheme.

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  • 9 Hide
    shahrooz , September 19, 2012 5:52 AM
    waiting for the Crysis guy
  • 0 Hide
    Nintendo Maniac 64 , September 19, 2012 6:15 AM
    I thought at first the car in the thumbnail was a Tesla Model S... I mean, it IS essentially a computer (runs Linux on dual Tegra 3s and all).

    Now THAT'S something Tom's should review. :p 
  • -2 Hide
    assasin32 , September 19, 2012 6:50 AM
    My stereo which is primitive by comparison has a far faster "boot up" time than any of these "infotainment" systems these cars have. It starts when I turn on the car there is mabey a 1sec delay and another 1sec if I decide to put in a cd as it has to start spinning it.

    And if you want the fancy features I still think an AUX connection from the stereo to the phone is the best bet. If its a smartphone you have the internet/mp3/pandora/gps and if you want an OBD2 scanner like Torque in case your car breaks down. And people usually upgrade these things once every few years and there will be no compatability issues using an AUX connection.
  • -4 Hide
    stellato12 , September 19, 2012 1:19 PM
    .....but can it play Crysis?
  • 0 Hide
    cknobman , September 19, 2012 1:36 PM
    Waiting for an STI version of the Subaru BRX or TRD version of the Scion FR-S. From most reviews I have read the Hyundai handles like a pig on the track and those Brembo brakes have issues after a few laps.
  • 2 Hide
    tuanies , September 19, 2012 2:00 PM
    Quote:
    I thought at first the car in the thumbnail was a Tesla Model S... I mean, it IS essentially a computer (runs Linux on dual Tegra 3s and all).

    Now THAT'S something Tom's should review. :p 


    We're trying to get one in for a week but considering how well they're selling it'll be a while.


    Quote:
    My stereo which is primitive by comparison has a far faster "boot up" time than any of these "infotainment" systems these cars have. It starts when I turn on the car there is mabey a 1sec delay and another 1sec if I decide to put in a cd as it has to start spinning it.

    And if you want the fancy features I still think an AUX connection from the stereo to the phone is the best bet. If its a smartphone you have the internet/mp3/pandora/gps and if you want an OBD2 scanner like Torque in case your car breaks down. And people usually upgrade these things once every few years and there will be no compatability issues using an AUX connection.


    They still have aux inputs. However, I have an article idea that'll appeal to smartphone users such as yourself - just waiting for the Windows Phone 8 launch to commence ;)  I'm open to any ideas you want to see covered though.

    Quote:
    .....but can it play Crysis?


    No but if you want to port Angry Birds or Duke Nukem 3D to QNX and find a way to get them loaded onto the infotainment system, go for it :p 

    Quote:
    Waiting for an STI version of the Subaru BRX or TRD version of the Scion FR-S. From most reviews I have read the Hyundai handles like a pig on the track and those Brembo brakes have issues after a few laps.


    You and i both. The Hyundai is a fun daily, but that extra weight doesn't help it around a track.

  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , September 19, 2012 2:13 PM
    What is this on Tom's again....?
  • 1 Hide
    travish82 , September 19, 2012 5:28 PM
    348 horsepower and 295 foot-pounds of torque... WTF? I feel like I've been living under a rock. I guess this is what happens when you only buy used cars with cash. Suddenly Hyundias are freaking fast.
  • -4 Hide
    xsamitt , September 19, 2012 5:36 PM
    I come here for Commuters not cars.This site has really lost it.
  • -3 Hide
    xsamitt , September 19, 2012 5:37 PM
    Make that computers lol.
  • 2 Hide
    tuanies , September 19, 2012 5:45 PM
    Quote:
    Make that computers lol.


    We still have the same computer / tech coverage as before, but with cars becoming so technologically advanced with the equivalent of a smartphone built in, the two paths are crossing.
  • -5 Hide
    xsamitt , September 19, 2012 6:03 PM
    I get that I do but i am just about done with coming here...No offense intended.
    It's like Elvis leaving the building and thinking he's still here kinda deal.
  • 0 Hide
    danwat1234 , September 19, 2012 7:46 PM
    Nintendo Maniac 64I thought at first the car in the thumbnail was a Tesla Model S... I mean, it IS essentially a computer (runs Linux on dual Tegra 3s and all).Now THAT'S something Tom's should review.

    Tegra 3s, is that for infotainment or does it run the drivetrain and safety systems too? I guess I'll do some Googling

    EDIT: Looks like it is just the infotainment and instrument cluster (http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13746_7-57458212-48/nvidia-touts-its-place-in-the-tesla-model-s/). Curious what computers control the rest of the car.
  • 2 Hide
    tuanies , September 19, 2012 7:50 PM
    Quote:
    Tegra 3s, is that for infotainment or does it run the drivetrain and safety systems too? I guess I'll do some Googling


    I believe the entire system is based on Tegra 3, or at least T3 powers the gauges as well. Interesting tidbit I learned from NVIDIA - the Tesla Model S was designed with Tegra 2, but thanks to NVIDIA's VCM module, they just swapped it for T3 when it launched without having to make too many changes.
  • 0 Hide
    billyboy999 , September 19, 2012 9:11 PM
    cknobmanWaiting for an STI version of the Subaru BRX or TRD version of the Scion FR-S. From most reviews I have read the Hyundai handles like a pig on the track and those Brembo brakes have issues after a few laps.

    It's not as bad as they say. A dude in a Genesis kept up with my STi and my friends' M3 and Evo X on the track. Then again he could have been a better driver and made up the difference in performance.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , September 19, 2012 9:19 PM
    Hmm, Tom's Hardware doing a review on automobile technology...interesting
  • -2 Hide
    ahnilated , September 19, 2012 9:31 PM
    Hmm... now we are reviewing cars? The computer environment must really be slowing down.
  • 1 Hide
    XZaapryca , September 19, 2012 11:53 PM
    assasin32My stereo which is primitive by comparison has a far faster "boot up" time than any of these "infotainment" systems these cars have. It starts when I turn on the car there is mabey a 1sec delay and another 1sec if I decide to put in a cd as it has to start spinning it.And if you want the fancy features I still think an AUX connection from the stereo to the phone is the best bet. If its a smartphone you have the internet/mp3/pandora/gps and if you want an OBD2 scanner like Torque in case your car breaks down. And people usually upgrade these things once every few years and there will be no compatability issues using an AUX connection.
    Makes it hard to use steering wheel controls. Fiddling with your phone while driving is pretty bad. I know a guy who thinks he good at it. He's not.
  • 0 Hide
    danwat1234 , September 20, 2012 3:32 AM
    It's kind of funny how it takes a while to boot up the infotainment system. Looking at the benchmarks it seems slow and I can't help but point out that the processors used are probably $30 or less in cost (Smart phone/Tablet ARM chips) and so they could jump to a better processor for more performance without too much of a price hike. That or make the software better take advantage of all cores while booting up and ensure that the onboard SSD isn't a big bottleneck.

    OR, I don't know, suspend to flash or sleep (keep LPDDR active)? Why does the infotainment system have to boot up every time the car is on?
  • 0 Hide
    tuanies , September 20, 2012 1:53 PM
    Quote:
    It's kind of funny how it takes a while to boot up the infotainment system. Looking at the benchmarks it seems slow and I can't help but point out that the processors used are probably $30 or less in cost (Smart phone/Tablet ARM chips) and so they could jump to a better processor for more performance without too much of a price hike. That or make the software better take advantage of all cores while booting up and ensure that the onboard SSD isn't a big bottleneck.

    OR, I don't know, suspend to flash or sleep (keep LPDDR active)? Why does the infotainment system have to boot up every time the car is on?


    Most of the cars have a preboot procedure they go through when the proximity key is detection / the driver opens the door, which doesn't make the boot-up time too noticeable. They can't go to sleep due to battery life concerns. Even at the minimal amounts of power, the system would still drain power from the battery and the car companies have to think about long-time parking.

    As for the hardware equation, automotive technology is about 5-years behind. The companies have to plan and source all the components during the development cycle, which is typically 5 years prior to the vehicle release, hence why it can't always have the latest and greatest.
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