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Results: Sandra And TouchXPRT

Lenovo IdeaCentre Horizon 27 Review: Our First Table PC
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Naturally, a low-voltage dual-core chip isn't going to stand a chance against a faster quad-core processor in a synthetic measure of CPU performance like SiSoftware’s Sandra Arithmetic module. Lenovo isn’t just shooting for a lower price on this one, though. It's also trying to equip you with usable battery life for those times when you want to pick the IdeaCentre Horizon up and lay it down on the coffee table in your living room. The Dell system doesn’t even have a battery.

The IdeaCentre Horizon enjoys a win in Sandra's Memory Bandwidth sub-test thanks to its use of DDR3-1600. Curiously, although we found DDR3-1600 in Dell's XPS 2710 as well, the company had it configured to run at 1333 MT/s.

This is the first review where we've used TouchXPRT, a home media benchmark that synthesizes a touch-oriented workload. It doesn’t actually require that you have fingers in order to run.

Of course, Dell's XPS 2710 wasn’t around by the time we rolled this metric into our all-in-one test suite. You'll see it applied to other systems moving forward though, giving us a larger library of comparison data.

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  • 1 Hide
    Pyree , July 29, 2013 12:30 AM
    Would be nice if they have truth or dare.
  • 0 Hide
    majudhu , July 29, 2013 2:06 AM
    This explains the "for those who do" part
  • 1 Hide
    sgadadish , July 29, 2013 4:18 AM
    My only question is why not Haswell?? with all it's benefits for mobility where are the portable with the processor...
  • 1 Hide
    stupiduser , July 29, 2013 6:42 AM
    As reported on Slashdot IT - "defence agencies of key Western governments such as Australia, the US, Britain, Canada and New Zealand have banned Lenovo gear from being used in sensitive areas, because of concerns that the Chinese vendor has been leaving back doors in its devices for the Chinese Government."

    I wish Tom's would aim their incredible testing abilities at these types of claims. I would like to know if MY Lenova is making me vulnerable.
  • 0 Hide
    iknowhowtofixit , July 29, 2013 6:49 AM
    Thanks to Lenovo's horrific customer support, I won't ever have to consider purchasing a product of theirs. No, I'm not just saying this out of spite. I've had the misfortune of dealing with Lenovo dozens of times over the past few years. I can't say that I've had one pleasant experience. Now, if I have to deal with Lenovo for any reason, I'm forced to record the phone call due to the crazy amount of lying their reps are trained to do.
  • 0 Hide
    az0937 , July 29, 2013 8:00 AM
    http://forums.overclockersclub.com/
  • 0 Hide
    az0937 , July 29, 2013 8:00 AM
    http://technologygian.blogspot.com/
  • 0 Hide
    tourist , July 29, 2013 2:53 PM
    Try using this for any length of time as a table pc and your neck and back will be in knots. Not enough gpu power to really make it interesting for gamers but i can see this in industrial, medical applications, schools etc. I can see apu's being used in this application at a much lower price point.
  • 0 Hide
    Crashman , July 30, 2013 2:23 AM
    Quote:
    Try using this for any length of time as a table pc and your neck and back will be in knots. Not enough gpu power to really make it interesting for gamers but i can see this in industrial, medical applications, schools etc. I can see apu's being used in this application at a much lower price point.
    You're right, if we treat this as a huge tablet or an IPC, it looks pretty good. Thanks!

  • -1 Hide
    rcald2000 , July 30, 2013 6:54 PM
    I'm a help desk technician and I'll tell you one thing that I've learned about mobile graphics cards in all-in-one PCs; they are a very bad idea. Just yesterday I had the pleasure of troubleshooting a 4-5 year old Dell all-in-one, which had a problem with the video going black for thirty seconds at a time. I of course attempted to upgrade the video drivers, and found out that neither Dell nor nVidia had ever updated the drivers. I believe the computer originally shipped with Vista 32 bit but was advertised as being Windows 7 upgradeable. I base this opinion on the reviews that I read about the machine, and also on the fact that it had both a Windows Vista and Windows 7 logo sticker on it. Dell's site didn't have any drivers newer than 2009 and nVidia's own auto video driver detection application couldn't identify the video card. In conclusion, I think using a mobile video card in a like this size is lame. But I do applaud Lenovo for trying out new ideas. I would have more faith in the form factor if a company like Samsung was behind it. Also, I should mention that I'm typing this very review on my Lenovo X230.

    Lenovo X230
    i7 ivy bridge processor
    16 GB RAM
    500 GB 7200 rpm drive
    HD4000 integrated graphics
    * connected to one external Dell UltraSharp U2412M 24" monitor.
  • 0 Hide
    Ed Chombeau , August 3, 2013 10:38 PM
    Retired; and need big screen to see ; would take it on car travel but airline travel?
  • 0 Hide
    Crashman , August 5, 2013 2:45 PM
    Quote:
    Try using this for any length of time as a table pc and your neck and back will be in knots. Not enough gpu power to really make it interesting for gamers but i can see this in industrial, medical applications, schools etc. I can see apu's being used in this application at a much lower price point.


    Quote:
    Retired; and need big screen to see ; would take it on car travel but airline travel?
    It's about as long and wide as an oversized carry-on bag. Which means you may get it past the gate, or not, depending on how strict the airline staff is being at that gate. And you'd want something to protect the screen.

  • 0 Hide
    Marlin Schwanke , August 5, 2013 4:05 PM
    Buying budget priced gear from any Asian company is a crap shoot. I don't think Samsung, Acer, Asus or Lenovo have very good customer service. They all just shift product out the door and start working on the next one.
  • 0 Hide
    magic couch , August 7, 2013 12:43 PM
    Anyone else find it strange how in the photoshop CS6 test enabling OpenCL actually slowed down the rendering for the Dell tablepc? What's up with that?
  • 0 Hide
    Crashman , August 7, 2013 3:05 PM
    Quote:
    Anyone else find it strange how in the photoshop CS6 test enabling OpenCL actually slowed down the rendering for the Dell tablepc? What's up with that?
    Certain filters are threaded, and others are OpenCL-enabled. So OpenCL and CPU-only tests are different.
  • 0 Hide
    JPNpower , August 7, 2013 6:24 PM
    These monster screen thingies are awesome. Most likely the future (for airplane entertainment awesomeness). Reminds me of the (fake) old Microsoft Surface commercial.

    Why have a PC? Just buy a big a## table.
  • 0 Hide
    Crashman , August 7, 2013 6:45 PM
    Quote:
    These monster screen thingies are awesome. Most likely the future (for airplane entertainment awesomeness). Reminds me of the (fake) old Microsoft Surface commercial.

    Why have a PC? Just buy a big a## table.
    Maybe, but they'd need CPU and SSD upgrades to appeal to a wider market.

  • 0 Hide
    magic couch , August 10, 2013 7:27 PM
    Quote:
    Certain filters are threaded, and others are OpenCL-enabled. So OpenCL and CPU-only tests are different.

    Ahh, I thought it used both as I've seen some reviews on this website where software uses the cpu and gpu accelerated openCL together.

    Also a weird thing I've noticed is that in this article 7zip hands down beats every other program in both file compression time and size, yet in articles such as this one winrar is faster by a factor of over 2. Why is there such a discrepency? The articles are even using the same versions of the program.


  • 0 Hide
    Crashman , August 10, 2013 8:21 PM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Certain filters are threaded, and others are OpenCL-enabled. So OpenCL and CPU-only tests are different.

    Ahh, I thought it used both as I've seen some reviews on this website where software uses the cpu and gpu accelerated openCL together.

    Also a weird thing I've noticed is that in this article 7zip hands down beats every other program in both file compression time and size, yet in articles such as this one winrar is faster by a factor of over 2. Why is there such a discrepency? The articles are even using the same versions of the program.
    The would be a great question for our developer. I think the command line switches outlined in the "test setup" page might provide the answer, but only if I knew what those switches meant :p 

  • 0 Hide
    JPNpower , August 10, 2013 8:50 PM
    Crashman, thank you for your reply in the comments for all your articles.
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