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Technical Specifications, Materials, And Ergonomics

Tt eSports Level 10 M Mouse Review: A BMW For Your Hands
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Technical Specifications

The Thermaltake Tt eSports Level 10 M is almost exclusively made out of aluminum. It does set new standards for material durability and build quality, even though, again, there are a few nitpicks we'll go over. For now, here are the technical specifications:

Available Colors
Diamond Black
Iron White
Military Green
Blazing Red
Sensor Sensitivity
8200 DPI Maximum
Set via Software, Four Settings via Mouse
Defaults: 800, 1600, 3200, and 5000 DPI
Sensor Type
Laser
Avago ADNS-9800
Number of Buttons
Seven Total
- Two Mouse Buttons
- Two Side Buttons on Each Side
- Four-Way Button on Left Side
Button Deactivation
Side Buttons Can Be Deactivated
Button Manufacturer
Omron
Internal Memory
128 KB
Macro Keys
11
Number of Profiles
Five
Lighting Effects
Left Mouse Button, Mouse Wheel, Thermaltake Logo
Seven Color Options
Mouse CableUSB 2.0
1.8-Meter
Braided
Weights (for Weight Adjustment)
None
Weight (without Cable)
185 gram
Dimensions 147 x 67.5 x 38.8 mm


Materials and Coating

The retail version of the Tt eSports Level 10 M looks more mature than the first engineering samples we saw. Its aluminum components are very robust, leaving an impression of high-quality manufacturing. We had to use a magnifying glass to find any ridges and tear-off edges.

The coating on top of the mouse is a different story. It should hold up well enough under normal use, but we strongly recommend against wearing any rings on the hand with which you mouse, especially if they have sharp edges. Bare metal could scratch the nonslip coating or the clear coating on the metal strip in the middle.

Ergonomics

We had four people with different hand sizes and shapes use the Tt eSports Level 10 M. We wanted to know about its general handling, long-term comfort, and best-fit gaming applications. Despite initial skepticism about the very open design, it didn't take long for our quartet to acknowledge the mouse's comfort.

In spite of the Level 10 M’s size, it’s designed to be used with a combination of a claw and a fingertip grip. Only parts of the hand touch the peripheral as it's moved around with your fingers. The symmetrical shape, which can be changed via tilt adjustment, supports similar hand-feel for righties and lefties. This makes the mouse ideal for mid- to high-sensitivity gamers.

The only attribute you'll need to adapt to is a heavy 185-gram weight that'll tire out enthusiasts with smaller hands and anyone not used to gaming for long periods of time. If you're a more seasoned power user, though, the weight should be fine, particularly since Teflon feet make the Level 10 M easier to move.

Large, well-separated mouse buttons have nice switch activation, with a very exact and well-placed pressure point. This conveys predictable feedback.

The strain relief up front is more for good looks than functionality. The mouse cable is a little inflexible at first, but it gets better as you use it. Eventually, the cable reaches a point where it doesn’t negatively impact the mouse’s movement.

We’re not going to spend any time on the gold-plated USB plug that companies feel the need to include for marketing reasons. The attached cap is useful for protecting the connector during transport, though.

A polling rate of up to 1000 Hz comes in handy for high-DPI settings. Then again, we don't see anyone really using the 8200 DPI maximum resolution.

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Top Comments
  • 10 Hide
    amuffin , October 1, 2012 4:27 AM
    Quote:
    At about $100

    Thanks, but it's kinda expensive...
Other Comments
  • 8 Hide
    lahawzel , October 1, 2012 4:26 AM
    "The Tt eSports Level 10 M feels cooler to the touch than a well-known competitor's flagship".

    Dangit, which mouse is this? The picture shows too little of it for me to tell!
  • 10 Hide
    amuffin , October 1, 2012 4:27 AM
    Quote:
    At about $100

    Thanks, but it's kinda expensive...
  • -1 Hide
    ricardok , October 1, 2012 4:45 AM
    lahawzel"The picture shows too little of it for me to tell!
    Razer??
  • 0 Hide
    olaf , October 1, 2012 4:53 AM
    i guess someoen got a good deal on his new BMW after this article....
  • 9 Hide
    FormatC , October 1, 2012 4:59 AM
    Quote:
    i guess someoen got a good deal on his new BMW after this article....
    Wrong, I'm an Audi-Driver :D 
  • 5 Hide
    olaf , October 1, 2012 5:32 AM
    Quote:
    Wrong, I'm an Audi-Driver :D 


    Hah there may be hope for you yet :) 
  • 0 Hide
    FormatC , October 1, 2012 5:47 AM
    No chance. I had 2 BMWs, never again ;) 
  • -1 Hide
    designasaurus , October 1, 2012 5:53 AM
    For the hand-temperature test, was the competitor's mouse also used with fingertip/claw grip?

    I ask because I use fingertip grip myself, and I am inclined to think that simply keeping the bulk of your hand off the mouse does a lot to reduce sweating. In fact, the only places that get sweaty are where the fingertips go, just like in the picture of the Level 10 M!
  • 0 Hide
    FormatC , October 1, 2012 6:05 AM
    Quote:
    it’s designed to be used with a combination of a claw and a fingertip grip.

    It was measured the same place (on both mices) where the palm rested really. Take a look at the first and second photo (sweat traces). The second mouse was touched in the same way (I hate the complete palm-grip) :) 
  • 0 Hide
    boletus , October 1, 2012 6:29 AM
    Way too many gizmos for me; how do you hold onto it without pressing a button? Does anyone make an ergonomic, durable mouse with adjustable DPI and less than 6 buttons? I have a Logitech G500 with a primary button that wore out after one year, and I had to disable the thumb buttons because they just get in the way. Spent $60, and feel like a fool, since the cheapo OEM Logitech mice last longer. But I need high DPI for my wrist.
  • 0 Hide
    echondo , October 1, 2012 6:34 AM
    So, now we need to worry about our mice overheating?

    /sarcasm
  • -1 Hide
    sixdegree , October 1, 2012 6:47 AM
    I'd like to see some comparison on thermal performance between this Level 10M mouse and TT Black Element Cyclone. One of them use passive thermal solution in form of holes while the other use active spinning fan. Also, operating noise benchmark would be nice.
  • -1 Hide
    ryedizzel , October 1, 2012 8:07 AM
    not enough side buttons to replace my razer for MMOs (or most other games i play). but i can attest to Thermaltake's build quality. currently using their Meka G1 mechanical keyboard after trying the razer and corsair and sending them back.
  • -1 Hide
    ryedizzel , October 1, 2012 8:09 AM
    and for the record corsair's K60 keyboard also had great build quality. but i felt the cherry black switches on the Meka G1 were better for gaming.
  • 1 Hide
    FormatC , October 1, 2012 9:19 AM
    @boletus:
    You can disable every button separately if you dislike the switch :) 
  • -1 Hide
    Jax69 , October 1, 2012 9:27 AM
    is it ambidextrous or not?
  • 0 Hide
    FormatC , October 1, 2012 9:34 AM
    Yes, it is.
  • -2 Hide
    tului , October 1, 2012 9:35 AM
    You could have called a 6 pointed screwdriver what it is...A Torx.
  • 0 Hide
    tului , October 1, 2012 9:40 AM
    tuluiYou could have called a 6 pointed screwdriver what it is...A Torx.


    Or actually a hex driver, which it appears to be.
  • 7 Hide
    FormatC , October 1, 2012 9:51 AM
    Quote:
    You could have called a 6 pointed screwdriver what it is...A Torx.


    Typical translation error - but it insn't a Torx :D 


    This is a so-called Inbus design, not Torx (left: Inbus, right: Torx)
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