Six Low-Voltage Dual-Channel 8 GB Memory Kits, Overclocked

Kingston HyperX Genesis DDR3L-1600

Kingston’s $70 KHX1600C9D3LK2/8GX dual-channel kit features both DDR3L detection and XMP, both providing DDR3-1600 values. Other features depend on the board into which they’re installed.

For example, motherboards that support DDR3L will automatically configure these to DDR3-1600 at 1.35 V, while those that don’t support the low-voltage standard will set the same frequency and timings using 1.50 V. XMP likewise provides a DDR3-1600 1.35 V profile, regardless of whether the board detects DDR3L capability. The big difference is that XMP is required to reach the memory’s CAS 9 rating without lengthy manual configuration, as other detection modes yield a much looser CAS 11 timing set.

Platforms that don’t support DDR3-1600 will default to DDR3-1333 CAS 9.

Kingston DRAM includes a limited lifetime warranty.

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  • Nice article.
    A bit surprised that Corsair Vengeance didn't make an appearance though.

    Been using G.Skill RAMs since I can remember, and they've never failed me!
    1
  • Very interesting read, thanks Tom's! Guess we've been bothering you enough about, erm, "half-height" overclocker's ram enough for you to want to do an article on it. Shame that the mystery modules chose not to participate... perhaps I'll send you my 8 gigs. Want to swap? Ship me some ram to use in the mean-time and I'll ship you my sticks.
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  • In other words, RAM speed is irrelevant if you are not using an APU.
    8
  • No power consumption numbers? :/
    -2
  • Good testing but at the start of the article, much emphasis was placed on the degradation of the cpu due to high memory voltage and then it just turns into a memory speed test. What about the cpu degradation?
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  • Good article. Still left wondering why anyone would choose low voltage RAM when costs do not outweigh the benefits.
    -2
  • It is only worthwhile to pickup low voltage ram if you can obtain it at the same price as 1.5v ram. Then again, the Ballistix is around the same price point as other similar timing ram.
    2
  • Pointless analysis for too little performance AND price difference...
    Would be a bit less irrelevant if more brands were tested.
    To be honest I was more interested on that "dirty little secret" details than the test itself.
    Also, an article named "who is who in the RAM marked" would be awesome, just like that one about Power Supplies...
    -1
  • excella1221Nice article.A bit surprised that Corsair Vengeance didn't make an appearance though.Been using G.Skill RAMs since I can remember, and they've never failed me!
    Here's from the article:
    Quote:
    We invited every major manufacturer (including a crowd-favorite ODM) to this round-up, and a few (including that ODM) chose not to participate.
    Corsair said they had some new modules coming out and didn't want to focus on older models.
    cobra5000Good testing but at the start of the article, much emphasis was placed on the degradation of the cpu due to high memory voltage and then it just turns into a memory speed test. What about the cpu degradation?
    What about it? It's never been seen at 1.50V.
    0
  • allan_hmPointless analysis for too little performance AND price difference...Would be a bit less irrelevant if more brands were tested.To be honest I was more interested on that "dirty little secret" details than the test itself.Also, an article named "who is who in the RAM marked" would be awesome, just like that one about Power Supplies...
    Article intent was to find modules within Intel's 1.55V limit that pulled top numbers in frequency and/or latency. Some were found, article is a success.
    0
  • Comparing data within each chart was not as interesting to me as comparing data between charts, which once again showed that although differences exist, they are tiny.
    Put a lot more thought into your platform, CPU and graphics card; for RAM, get the cheapest DDR3-1600 CAS9 and call it a day.
    1
  • Anybody read Intel's web pages in this regard ?

    1.5 volts is for the JDEC profiles .... but most RAM speeds are advertised and labeled based upon their XMP profiles......most XMP profiles for i5 and i7 RAM is 1.65. In fact, over 2/3 of the RAM on Intel's XMP compatible list are over 1.50 volts.

    I have seen many posts saying "Well that's a MoBo manufacturer thing". No....Intel sets the XMP profile. I agree, Intel's JDEC specifications stipulate 1.5 volts .... for JDEC profiles ..... but XMP "allows compatible DDR3 memory to perform beyond standard specifications" and is "predefined and tested" by Intel

    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/gaming-computers/intel-extreme-memory-profile-xmp.html

    Quote:
    Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (Intel® XMP) allows you to overclock compatible DDR3 memory to perform beyond standard specifications. It’s designed to enhance the gaming features built into Intel® technology–based PCs. If you like to overclock and squeeze as much performance from your PC as possible, then memory based on Intel XMP gives you that extra edge you need to dominate—without breaking a sweat. Predefined and tested Intel XMP profiles can be loaded via BIOS or a specific tuning application through a computer’s operating system. Often the easiest way to load Intel XMP profiles is using a tuning utility, which may be available depending on the particular board manufacturer. To learn whether a tuning utility is available on your system, you should contact the board manufacturer.


    Again, most listed compatible i5 / i7 RAM is 1.65 .... at least according to Intel's compatibility lists

    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/gaming-computers/core-i5-processor-memory-datasheet.html
    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/gaming-computers/core-i7-memory-suppliers-datasheet.html

    Intel's approved i7 Compatibilty List (April 2012) includes:

    34 1.65 volt modules
    07 1.60 volt modules
    19 1.50 volt modules
    01 1.25 volt modules
    0
  • Maybe I'm being anal but, Westmere (Nehalem) was the die shrink to 32 nm (tick). Sandy Bridge was the following change in microarchitecture (tock).
    1
  • ... i got me the crucial balistix 3~4 months ago... a 16Gb of them... and they OC good too... i have them running @ 1926Mhz 8-8-8-26
    -1
  • HaserathNo power consumption numbers?


    Perhaps because memory doesn't use that much power to begin with? Be a cold day in hell when you have to buy a 1kW PSU just because you add another stick of ram.
    0
  • Where are the cost for each kit? Did I miss it? Flipped through pages and could not find anything on the cost.
    0
  • JackNaylorPEAnybody read Intel's web pages in this regard ?1.5 volts is for the JDEC profiles ...


    It's "JEDEC", the first 'e' is not silent/missing.

    http://www.jedec.org
    -1
  • HaserathNo power consumption numbers?



    3-6 watts isn't going to kill anyone.
    2
  • Exactly the article i wanted to read, i was asking myself what clocks could the low voltage modules achieve at high voltage.

    God, i wanted to buy the ballistix tactical in february, i bought the ballistix sport instead because i found 32GB for 158$ but they are taller and 1.5v rated, glad to know it doesn't make much of a difference in games past 1600Mhz.

    Great work!
    0
  • happyballzWhere are the cost for each kit? Did I miss it? Flipped through pages and could not find anything on the cost.

    On the day they were tested, Adata was $72, Crucial $70, Geil $75, G.Skill $68, Kingston $70. That changes pretty quickly though.
    0