NEC PA272W 27-Inch Monitor Review: Accuracy And Flexibility

NEC PA272W: Unparalleled Accuracy And Flexibility

We can't review a Quad HD display without talking about value. These are still high-end products, and not everyone has the budget to spend as much on a monitor as they dropped on the rest of their rig. Vendors know prices are high, and each one offers something different to set its products apart. We try to uncover whatever that is each time a new display lands in the lab. Yes, the PA272W costs more than most of the already-expensive QHD monitors out there. But it also comes armed with more features and abilities than any screen we've reviewed previously.

NEC has always included a fairly complete set of calibration adjustments in its products, but this panel sets a new standard in our experience. We’re impressed by the vast array of color gamut, white point, and gamma options available, and we love that every picture mode is fully adjustable.

After spending a long afternoon exploring and working with the OSD, I was able to create three highly accurate picture modes meeting the Adobe RGB, sRGB, and DCI specifications. Then I did the same thing again in about 60 minutes with NEC’s excellent SpectraView software. It's unfortunate that the company charges an extra $99 for something that'd make a great value-add. Once you use it, though, the cost becomes secondary. I've used a few other auto-calibration solutions, and SpectraView is by far the best one.

Performance-wise, the PA272W comes out on top or close in every metric. Color, grayscale, and gamma accuracy are beyond reproach. Contrast, while never stellar on any LCD monitor, is better than most of the screens we’ve tested. Response time and input lag are on par with other IPS monitors (even if that's obviously not the intent).

What really sets this display apart is its unparalleled flexibility and adjustability. We’ve never seen such a complete set of calibration controls outside of a commercial projector. The color management system allowed us to create custom gamuts that measured within a whisker of perfect. Grayscale controls did the same and offered presets we haven’t seen on other screens. And the gamma control easily has the largest range of any display we’ve worked with of any type.

The fact that the PA272W can duplicate and even exceed most of the abilities of a $40,000 Dolby reference monitor speaks volumes about the progress of LCD flat panel technology. Evolution may seem slow compared to the pace at which graphics processors and CPUs move, but strides are being taken.

For those still waiting for IPS screens with accurate color, high contrast, and a sub-$300 selling point, we advise patience. Prices seem pretty stable for the time being. It looks to us like manufacturers are placing a higher priority on features and better performance rather than moving quickly to cut costs.

We’ve said before that a truly professional-quality monitor needs to combine accuracy with full adjustability. No display we’ve tested, at any price, can do what this one does. The Tom's Hardware Elite award is typically recognition we reserve for the best of the best, regardless of price. We feel that it's appropriate to recognize this particular screen for its reference-level performance and superb flexibility. Although you'll pay a premium, there are tasks that require excellence, and the PA272W delivers.

Create a new thread in the US Reviews comments forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
8 comments
Comment from the forums
    Your comment
  • SuckRaven
    Every time Tom's Hardware reviews monitors, I keep posting in the comments that they should review NEC and EIZO for accuracy in comparison to the usual suspects. Finally my prayers have been answered. (Not that there are not other places that have not already done a good job of including reviews of high-end monitors with color accuracy, and uniformity as the main focus), but Tom's has always been a preferred resource. Anyways, you guys should do a shootout with the top flagships from HP, Dell, NEC and and EIZO, perhaps the CG277). Nice review.
    4
  • Pikker
    I've recently purchased this monitor with calibration tools and hood for a discounted price, needless to say it looks incredible, putting to shame an older 27" IPS display that I had.
    Regarding the NEC 272 vs. Eizo 277, I think they are more same than different... the Eizo has an integrated calibrator, 16-bit LUT, bigger color space, and a bunch of other tweaks that should objectively make it a better display, but not ~$1000 better IMO. If you have that kinda money to burn, get two PA272W's instead.
    1
  • ubercake
    Good review.

    I think everyone should notice the low-cost IPS monitors offer sub-par contrast. Who cares about color accuracy if you can't see the in-betweens? Aren't the shades/hues just as important? This is something people don't realize when they pick up that $400 IPS display. Heck, contrast is better on the BenQ TN display than on the less expensive IPS displays in the review. Color without good contrast is a waste. Contrast is what you compromise at the lower end of the IPS monitor scale.

    You have to spend money to get a quality IPS monitor. It's good to see that you can get this kind of performance at a lower price point now.

    This NEC monitor is definitely impressive. It has great color accuracy AND contrast. Great for photography and graphic arts/design applications. This is a pro monitor and why you spend money on an IPS monitor.
    0
  • RedJaron
    I have a dream that one day I will own such a display.
    0
  • ceberle
    Anonymous said:
    Every time Tom's Hardware reviews monitors, I keep posting in the comments that they should review NEC and EIZO for accuracy in comparison to the usual suspects. Finally my prayers have been answered. (Not that there are not other places that have not already done a good job of including reviews of high-end monitors with color accuracy, and uniformity as the main focus), but Tom's has always been a preferred resource. Anyways, you guys should do a shootout with the top flagships from HP, Dell, NEC and and EIZO, perhaps the CG277). Nice review.


    Look for a review of the HP Z27x in a few weeks. It's in our lab now.

    -Christian-
    0
  • PapaCrazy
    Bought one of these and ended up with a display that had several dead pixels and a couple hot pixels. Exchanged it, got a display with even more deal pixels, I stopped counting in the teens. For $1400, seems offensive. Dell was offering a zero dead pixel guarantee for half the price with the u2711. Calibrated, it seems to do quite well in color accuracy, I never get complaints after file deliveries, but the Dell is made like a piece of shit. Has a major heating problem which effects the top (where the heat collects) of the display's color output after intensive usage. I'm sick of this over-inflated display market. They are either under-engineered or overpriced.
    0
  • Pikker
    Quote:
    Bought one of these and ended up with a display that had several dead pixels and a couple hot pixels. Exchanged it, got a display with even more deal pixels, I stopped counting in the teens. For $1400, seems offensive.


    That's some bad luck... I got mine from B&H and the display was perfect out of the box. Otherwise, the thing is built like a tank with an all-metal frame under the plastic outer shell, and it doesn't flex no matter what, if anything, I'd say it's over-engineered.
    0
  • PapaCrazy
    Anonymous said:
    Quote:
    Bought one of these and ended up with a display that had several dead pixels and a couple hot pixels. Exchanged it, got a display with even more deal pixels, I stopped counting in the teens. For $1400, seems offensive.


    That's some bad luck... I got mine from B&H and the display was perfect out of the box. Otherwise, the thing is built like a tank with an all-metal frame under the plastic outer shell, and it doesn't flex no matter what, if anything, I'd say it's over-engineered.


    Got mine from B&H too. NEC released an upgraded model w/ improved colorimeter shortly after my purchase. It could very well have been an accumulation of old stock, the backwash of sorts, that I drank from. When studying up, I found the only way to get a guarantee of zero dead pixels on NEC displays, you need to pony up for the ultra-expensive medical grade displays. It is well made though, I thought the portrait mode was a great feature and the stand was far more solid than the Dell's. Ran cooler as well. (thermally I mean)
    0