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OCZ’s High-Speed Data Link

OCZ's HSDL: A New Storage Link For Super-Fast SSDs
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OCZ isn’t doing anything particularly tricky with its HSDL interface. Everything happening under the hood is very standardized—and OCZ is very forthcoming in describing the foundation on which HSDL is based. HSDL employs the same 8b/10b encoding scheme as PCI Express, SATA, HyperTransport, and USB 3.0. And once PCI Express 3.0 catches on, HSDL will even accommodate the 128b/130b encoding that interface specifies.

For the most part, PCI Express is the center of HSDL’s world.

A single HSDL channel consists of four PCIe lanes bonded together, yielding predictable scaling. Right now, the company is offering its IBIS SSDs with single-channel adapter cards that (obviously) drop into a x4 motherboard slot. In the future, it plans to scale up to dual-channel cards that’ll drop into a PCIe x8 slot.

The math is easy. In a second-gen PCI Express x4 slot, HSDL serves up 2000 MB/s of throughput. In a x8 slot, a dual-channel card would push up to 4000 MB/s. Of course, the dual-channel card OCZ plans will also sport four ports, limiting cumulative throughput to roughly 1 GB/s per drive (still more bandwidth than a single first-gen drive can saturate).

In between the controller and the drive, OCZ is using 4x SFF-8087 connectors. While it might seem a bit ironic to use SAS connectivity to outperform the SAS interface, OCZ says the four-channel connector gives it the number of LVDS pairs needed for HSDL. Each channel consists of four bi-directional pairs, correlating to the four bonded PCIe lanes.

The magic happens at each end of the cabled connection, where a logic chip serves as a signal driver and buffer. In the case of a dual-channel controller attached to a single drive, that piece of logic also multiplexes to create a single ultra-wide “PCIe x8” link. If you want to get a little more technical, OCZ is using the logical PCIe layer over the company’s own embedded physical layer. On the drive itself, you have a conversation chip that turns the SATA into a PCIe-type signal (Petersen specifies that it isn’t actually PCIe), which is serialized and re-buffered before getting sent out.

On the controller side, another chip serves as the basic physical protocol conversion to turn the physical layer into PCIe. Should a motherboard vendor wish to integrate HSDL support, it’d need the SAS connector and the conversion chip found on OCZ’s controller card—everything else is drive-focused. “The goal,” according to Petersen, “is to let motherboard vendors be able to implement HSDL at a five-dollar cost. If they can’t do it for less than $5, it’s a bad move for us to have the product.

Using this architecture, OCZ expects to see 500 MB/s per LVDS pair ramping up in the future. Of course, even with this first-generation implementation of the technology, HSDL is pretty much overkill—the performance of today’s controllers and NAND flash isn’t high enough to saturate a four-pair, 2 GB/s single-channel HSDL interface. OCZ’s Petersen teases that this will be addressed soon. With that said, the company expects today’s single-channel controller to handle the performance of first- and second-gen IBIS-style SSDs.

Three generations down the road, more throughput should start to become necessary (at least, that’s the game plan). When that happens, the company can start using standalone PCIe 3.0 transceivers and encoding chips (which are actually available right now) to adopt 128b/130b encoding, increasing throughput even more. There’s simply no need for that extra headroom today, given the available drive technology.

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Top Comments
  • 23 Hide
    randomizer , September 29, 2010 4:29 AM
    Chris I think I'll need to double-check your results. Better send the drive my way.
Other Comments
  • 5 Hide
    kelfen , September 29, 2010 4:15 AM
    I like where they are headed but price still high mates
  • 9 Hide
    Randomacts , September 29, 2010 4:18 AM
    *faints* I will never be able to afford these.


    Those HDDs cost more then my entire comptuer
  • 8 Hide
    jaghpanther , September 29, 2010 4:25 AM
    I do want to try out one of these, maybe sell my car?
  • 23 Hide
    randomizer , September 29, 2010 4:29 AM
    Chris I think I'll need to double-check your results. Better send the drive my way.
  • -3 Hide
    mianmian , September 29, 2010 4:49 AM
    Optic link technology may be more exciting. Can't wait to see lightpeak or similar stuffs to become real.
  • 0 Hide
    jupiter optimus maximus , September 29, 2010 5:31 AM
    First time saw those numbers, i gasped for air... OCZ, can you try to saturated with PCIe 2.0 x16 bandwidth? And can anyone tell me how much is it in Write and Read speeds at that bandwith?
  • 2 Hide
    wribbs , September 29, 2010 5:45 AM
    Very nice to see secondary storage tech at orders of magnitude beyond what we're used to. Can't wait for this type of tech to become mainstream.
  • 0 Hide
    compton , September 29, 2010 6:31 AM
    Stuff like this makes me wish I was involved in an enterprise-class technology environment that could actually benefit from 130,000 IOPS in a package like this. I guess I don't need to ditch my Agility 60, but I like where OCZ is headed.
  • 0 Hide
    h8signingin , September 29, 2010 7:00 AM
    Yet there are already drives that outperform these by a large margin available for a while now, like this:
    http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=RGS0256M&title=Super-Talent-RAIDDrive-GS-256GB-RAID0-PCI-Express-x8-Solid-State-Drive

    Read 1.4GB/s, Write 1.2GB/s

    At those speeds, it's like writing to RAM, only it's your hard drive.
    There were also capacities up to 1TB that cost about $4,000. There were even SLC models (which cost 4x more, approx. $15,000) which are slightly faster still.

    Personally, I wouldn't mind having 1TB of "slow" RAM as my hard drive, but it's just beyond my budget.
  • 0 Hide
    cangelini , September 29, 2010 7:07 AM
    h8signinginYet there are already drives that outperform these by a large margin available for a while now, like this:http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.ph [...] tate-DriveRead 1.4GB/s, Write 1.2GB/sAt those speeds, it's like writing to RAM, only it's your hard drive.There were also capacities up to 1TB that cost about $4,000. There were even SLC models (which cost 4x more, approx. $15,000) which are slightly faster still.Personally, I wouldn't mind having 1TB of "slow" RAM as my hard drive, but it's just beyond my budget.


    Yup, check it out! =)
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/super-talent-raiddrive,2513.html
  • 0 Hide
    Khimera2000 , September 29, 2010 9:25 AM
    OK sorry to say i that i do not see how you can compare Super Talent to this one. first its based on an X8 slot as opposed to an x4, but if you want to im sure someone out there will compare the x8 releas of this technolagy to the super talent, second if you read not so closely the super talent uses 4 raided SSD drives whitch means your 3 drives over for comparison, this is after all the performance from a single drive and a single controller and its already half way to the bandwith of the super talent, drop in a second card and you still have room to spare for bandwith, drop in there announced x8 card and you have 4x 740mb read 690mb write VS the 4x 355mb read 215mb write that might be used in the super talent last time i checked 2760mb read was much more then a 1420mb read not to mention that even at those speeds the OCZ flaver still has 1.25 gigs of bandwith open on there x8 card... then again i can be wrong about this entire shpeal...
  • 1 Hide
    dredj , September 29, 2010 12:25 PM
    WOW! I kinda want show this to my boss to see if we can upgrade our servers. *sigh* Wish we were one of those give-me-more-performance-at-any-cost kind of companies. Oh well, can't wait for the trickle down to enthusiast level, I'm itching for a new build. :) 
  • 0 Hide
    nforce4max , September 29, 2010 12:34 PM
    If money buys happiness then I can't afford it, OCZ is Expensive!
  • 0 Hide
    blackened144 , September 29, 2010 1:26 PM
    comptonStuff like this makes me wish I was involved in an enterprise-class technology environment that could actually benefit from 130,000 IOPS in a package like this. I guess I don't need to ditch my Agility 60, but I like where OCZ is headed.

    I just showed this and the Revo drive to my boss and he is going to get the funds to do some testing.. In our clusters we are mainly limited by drive speed and we have previously tested the Fusion IO Drive Duo but they are just too expensive..
  • 0 Hide
    lp231 , September 29, 2010 2:00 PM
    eh heh, my predictions were right.
    On this "AsRock Wants the Best Mobo ideas"

    I've posted give an idea of this

    "4. Add SAS ports as they can also run regular SATA as well as them 15K drives. But most might say SSD is faster. If that is why not a SAS SSD?"


    And here it is!

    SAS SSD!
    W00T!

    http://www.tomshardware.com/news/mobo-design-contest-x58-p67,11308.html
  • -2 Hide
    lp231 , September 29, 2010 2:00 PM
    lp231eh heh, my predictions were right.On this "AsRock Wants the Best Mobo ideas"I've posted an idea of this "4. Add SAS ports as they can also run regular SATA as well as them 15K drives. But most might say SSD is faster. If that is why not a SAS SSD?"And here it is! SAS SSD!W00T!http://www.tomshardware.com/news/m [...] 11308.html

  • 0 Hide
    wolfram23 , September 29, 2010 2:22 PM
    Wow... that is FAST!
  • 2 Hide
    rwmunchkin12788 , September 29, 2010 2:27 PM
    Warning... completely useless post incoming:

    o.O

    Woooooow....Maybe in 4 years the prices will drop enough to make this sort of thing mainstream?
  • 0 Hide
    rwpritchett , September 29, 2010 3:49 PM
    Impressive.

    Tom's: any chance of a giveaway contest with these drives? /wishful thinking
  • -1 Hide
    Supertrek32 , September 29, 2010 4:20 PM
    I would have loved to see Windows boot time numbers with this thing. I'd imagine pairing this thing with a super-fast posting board would make you computer turn on almost instantaneously.
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