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AMD Radeon HD 6670 And 6570: Turkeys Or Turkish Delights?

AMD Radeon HD 6670 And 6570: Turkeys Or Turkish Delights?
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Based on the new Turks GPU, AMD’s Radeon HD 6570 and 6670 graphics cards are poised to hit the $80-$100 market. Do these products have what it takes to compete in this fiercely competitive segment, or are AMD's subtle evolutionary changes too small?

For the third time this month, we’re reporting a graphics card launch from AMD. And this time it’s a double-header. Meet the Radeon HD 6570 and 6670:

These new products are a natural evolution of the Radeon HD 5570 and 5670, two very important cards in the sub-$100 graphics card market. For some time, we’ve recognized the Radeon HD 5570 as a realistic ~$65 starting point for budget buyers looking for respectable gaming hardware, and the ~$80 Radeon HD 5670 holds the distinction of being the most powerful reference design that doesn’t require a dedicated PCIe power cable.

To this point, most of the Radeon HD 6000-series cards employ a subtle (but notable) architectural tuning from the 5000-series days, so we expect these new models to be closely related to their predecessors. Let’s see how the Turks GPU stacks up:

This is another offspring of the Barts graphics processor introduced in the Radeon HD 6800 series, which itself was an evolution of Cypress. This one is scaled down to six SIMD engines, though. Each engine is associated with four texture units and is composed of 16 thread processors, with five stream processing units (ALUs) per thread processor. In the case of Turks, that makes for a grand total of 24 texture units and 480 ALUs. Two 64-bit memory controllers deliver an aggregate 128-bit memory interface, and both render back-ends host four color ROPs, totaling eight.

Turks sports the same features found across the entire Radeon 6000 line: improved tessellation performance, Eyefinity enhancements (these particular models support up to four displays), and Blu-ray 3D decode acceleration. At least for now, you'll find this GPU in two specific configurations: Radeon HD 6570 and 6670. Let’s consider where they sit in the grand scheme of things:


Radeon HD 5570
Radeon HD 6570Radeon HD 6670Radeon HD 5670GeForce GT 240GeForce GTS 450
Shader Cores:
400
480
480
40096
192
Texture Units:
20
24
24
203232
Color ROPs:
8
8
8
8816
Fabrication process:
40 nm
40 nm40 nm40 nm40 nm
40 nm
Core/Shader Clock:
650 MHz
650 MHz
800 MHz
775 MHz550/1360 MHz783/1566 MHz
Memory Clock:
900 MHz DDR3
900-1000 MHz GDDR5
900 MHz DDR3
900-1000 MHz GDDR5
1000 MHz GDDR5
1000 MHz GDDR5850 MHz GDDR5902 MHz GDDR5
Memory Bus:
128-bit
128-bit128-bit
128-bit128-bit128-bit
Memory Bandwidth:
28.8 GB/s DDR3
64 GB/s GDDR5
28.8 GB/s DDR3
64 GB/s GDDR5
64 GB/s64 GB/s
54.4 GB/s
57.7 GB/s
Thermal Design Power Idle/Maximum (W)
9.7/43 W
10/44 W DDR3
11/60 W GDDR5
12/66 W14/61 W
69 W Max.106 W Max.
Price
~$65
Online
$79
(MSRP)

$99
(MSRP)

~$80
Online
~$80
Online
~$115
Online


From this chart, it's particularly clear that Radeon HD 6570 and 6670 are simple evolutionary steps from Radeon HD 5570 and 5670. Though those cards share the same specifications per SIMD engine, the new models sports six (instead of five), resulting in 80 more ALUs and four more texture units. The Radeon HD 5570 and 6570 share the same clock rates; Radeon HD 6670 gets a 25 MHz core boost over the 5670. As a result, we expect the Turks-equipped cards to demonstrate a lead over their predecessors when it comes to performance, even if the advantage isn't particularly pronounced, given the identical ROP count and 128-bit memory interface.

While we don’t expect much from the similarly-priced GeForce GT 240 (a card with lower performance than the Radeon HD 5670), the GeForce GTS 450 can be found kissing the $100 mark, promising stiff competition for the new Radeon HD 6670 and its $99 MSRP. With double the CUDA cores and ROPs of the GT 240, Nvidia's GeForce GTS 450 is a serious player. But before we see how these entry-level cards fare in combat, let’s have a look at AMD's Radeon HD 6570 and 6670 reference hardware.

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Top Comments
  • 10 Hide
    jenkem , April 19, 2011 4:35 AM
    price aside, i'm rather impressed with the 6670. sure the 5750 and gts 450 are more powerful, but nvidia's card just looks ridiculous in the power draw graph. being the fastest card without a pci-e connector is more than just a title, the 6670 will become the new go-to card for people with dells, hps, and ect looking to upgrade to discrete graphics(like the 4670 and 5670 before it).
    also, a 5670 can be found on newegg for $73 before rebate.
Other Comments
  • 10 Hide
    jenkem , April 19, 2011 4:35 AM
    price aside, i'm rather impressed with the 6670. sure the 5750 and gts 450 are more powerful, but nvidia's card just looks ridiculous in the power draw graph. being the fastest card without a pci-e connector is more than just a title, the 6670 will become the new go-to card for people with dells, hps, and ect looking to upgrade to discrete graphics(like the 4670 and 5670 before it).
    also, a 5670 can be found on newegg for $73 before rebate.
  • 3 Hide
    4745454b , April 19, 2011 4:47 AM
    With $99 after MIR 5770s on newegg, the GTS450, 5750, and 6670 are all to expensive. I am most impressed that AMD has got this level of performance out of
  • 2 Hide
    Nintendork , April 19, 2011 4:54 AM
    The card has great overclock:

    960Mhz+ / 5000+Mhz for the memory. A 21% increase in games (tpu review).
  • 3 Hide
    fatkid35 , April 19, 2011 5:01 AM
    i used to play cod4 with a 3.0 ghz dual core and a radeon 4650 @ 1400x900 with good frame rates. and the whole pc only had a draw of 135 watts at the wall. this new 6670 is a kick @ss low power solution for most wanting to game on the semi cheap. kinda want one for my back up pc now.
  • 3 Hide
    enzo matrix , April 19, 2011 5:10 AM
    For $80, how can you beat a card that can overclock to 6670 speeds easily? And perform identically due to the same specs otherwise?
  • 3 Hide
    enzo matrix , April 19, 2011 5:11 AM
    ^The 6570, is this card I am referring to.
  • 2 Hide
    Pengle , April 19, 2011 5:18 AM
    How much better is the 6570 than the 4550
  • 6 Hide
    jestersage , April 19, 2011 5:32 AM
    great review!

    just wondering why we used a 1200w psu when most systems use only 10% of its capacity... i believe the power draw graphs are skewed due to lower efficiency at that load.
  • 1 Hide
    sudeshc , April 19, 2011 5:49 AM
    Another gr8 review just loved reading it.
  • 4 Hide
    mognet , April 19, 2011 6:06 AM
    jestersagegreat review!just wondering why we used a 1200w psu when most systems use only 10% of its capacity... i believe the power draw graphs are skewed due to lower efficiency at that load.


    Its just standard practise to overkill all other components to make sure they don't cause weird results. Besides the absolute draw isn't important its how the cards compare with each other.
  • 1 Hide
    rolli59 , April 19, 2011 6:35 AM
    Impressive improvement from the current cards.
  • 2 Hide
    weatherdude , April 19, 2011 6:45 AM
    Another great review from Tom's Hardware. This is the market segment that is most applicable to someone like me.

    I thought AMD shifted it's number branding forward for its 6000 series though. These cards should be compared to the 5770 and 5670...? Ahh forget it I'm still confused.
  • 4 Hide
    tpi2007 , April 19, 2011 7:09 AM
    PengleHow much better is the 6570 than the 4550



    A LOT better!

    The HD4550 has just 80 cores and 64-bit DDR3 memory, while the HD6570 has 480 cores and 128-bit GDDR5 memory!
  • 3 Hide
    gracefully , April 19, 2011 9:26 AM
    Wow, the 6670 performs like my 5750.
  • 3 Hide
    gracefully , April 19, 2011 9:27 AM
    gracefullyWow, the 6670 performs like my 5750.


    Oops, nevermind. I was looking at the wrong resolution.
  • 2 Hide
    ubercake , April 19, 2011 9:33 AM
    weatherdudeAnother great review from Tom's Hardware. This is the market segment that is most applicable to someone like me.I thought AMD shifted it's number branding forward for its 6000 series though. These cards should be compared to the 5770 and 5670...? Ahh forget it I'm still confused.

    They like you confused! This way you'll buy last year's performance in this year's packaging.

    If you're going to spend $100, there are a bunch of 5770s on Newegg that will do a better job.

    I was surprised not to see 5450s in the mix? They are decent cards for $40 on sale everywhere?
  • 0 Hide
    pelov , April 19, 2011 11:31 AM
    jestersagegreat review!just wondering why we used a 1200w psu when most systems use only 10% of its capacity... i believe the power draw graphs are skewed due to lower efficiency at that load.


    The power draw won't be 1200W or anywhere near it. The overkill with regards to the PSU is to make sure that it doesn't get limited by power and often these test machines are stacked to the max and only certain components are removed. The PSU may be 1200W, but depending on the efficiency (80+%, bronze, silver, gold and platinum) it'll draw exactly what the PC needs from the wall, therefore you can have a very high watt PSU that will actually save you $$ on your power bill compared to the cheapo PSU. Basically, have a 1200W PSU drawing 215W, or 90% accuracy (fill in your own numbers. that's an example).

    The videocards are very impressive. Cheap, sip power and perform very well.
  • 0 Hide
    jemm , April 19, 2011 11:42 AM
    Low power consumption on these cards.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , April 19, 2011 12:25 PM
    Could someone compare these cards to a 512MB 4670? How much better are they? This kind of GPU is perfect for people who don't want to buy new PSUs, don't care about playing the newest AAA commercial games, or run games at low resolutions (like 1366x768), and I'm all three. I would really like to know if it would be a good idea to say goodbye to my 4670 and get one of these.
  • 0 Hide
    Yuka , April 19, 2011 12:30 PM
    I have to disagree with the conclusion about the 6670. It's excellent value for a new HTPC that will push a 720p or 1080p TV with "decent" gaming capabilities. AFAIK there is no GTS450 low profile (though I think I saw a 5750 with a low profile PCB) that can match this card for the crowds it's aimed at.

    In fact, I was waiting for the 6k series to come in Low Profile PCBs and I'll build my HTPC with a 6670. Besides, my experiences with nVidia based cards and TVs have a long trail of frustration xD (even my current notebook with a GT425M gives me headaches when I try to plug it into the TV).

    Cheers!
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