SanDisk X210 256 And 512 GB: Enthusiast Speed; OEM Reliability

Results: 128 KB Sequential Performance

Fantastic sequential read and write performance is a trademark of modern SSDs. To measure it, we use incompressible data over a 16 GB LBA space and then test at queue depths from one to 16. We're reporting these numbers in binary (where 1 KB equals 1024) instead of decimal (where 1 KB is 1000 bytes). When necessary, we're also limiting the scale of the chart to enhance readability.

128 KB Sequential Read

Sporting the same controller and flash complement as SanDisk's Extreme II, you'd think that the OEM X210 would post identical numbers. That's not the case, as it turns out. There is a significant difference in our sequential read workload; the consumer-oriented Extreme outpaces the more conservative X210.

Then again, the delta isn't really worth fretting over; anything over 500 MB/s is just gravy.

128 KB Sequential Write

The same goes for writes. The Extreme II's exceptional write performance eclipses the X210. Again, though, we're not worried. If the OEM-oriented drive is slightly slower, we know there's probably a good reason.

Here's a break-down of the maximum observed 128 KB sequential read and write performance with Iometer:

The 256 and 512 GB X210s shuffle into the middle of the pack with respectable results, though they still take a back seat to SanDisk's more enthusiast-oriented Extreme II. The company's other OEM-styled offering, the A110, leverages a more modern PCIe interface to secure its first-place finish. Throwing off the shackles of 6 Gb/s SATA is certainly beneficial.

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  • I logged onto Tom's this morning totally expecting a Kaveri review. What's up?
    1
  • Is the warranty 5 years or 3? Last page says one thing, an early page says another.Decent review, decent drives. Has THG considered doing something similar to what the car mags do, where they take certain products and use them for a year? It would be great to capture that kind of longer-term info on certain types of products, especially the kind that wear out (ODDs, fans, cases, HDDs, SSDs, etc.).
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  • What about Samsung SSD pro 512GB? I bought 2 of these and on that chart is only 128 and 256GB
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  • @vertexxthere isn't anything particularly exciting about Kaveri going by Anand's review. I shall want for the A10 version with higher clocks
    -1
  • MLC with 5k write endurance!And affordable and fast?We may very well have a new solid contender in the SSD world
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  • anandtech has one? sweeeet, later tom's!
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  • I agree with Chris. I don't need the fastest bench speeds in a SSD. Most models now are very fast and the user won't see the performance difference. I want reliability and longevity. Looks like this is a smart choice for any new builder.
    3
  • sweet finally another company that can compete with intel's 5 year warrenty!
    2
  • Can we PLEASE have some normal graphs for once? The graph on page 5 in stupid 3D is so bad it's comical. The "perspective" effect completely screws with the data. This has zero added value and is almost as bad as still using clipart.
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  • I find it hard to believe that the author has had "literally dozens of SSd's die" on him over the years. This would suggest that many systems have contributed to the demise of many of the SSD's being used, which seems somewhat outlandish. Just the cost factor involved in the purchase of so many SSD's and then having over a dozen of them fail, supposedly also from various companies, since if they were all from the same company it would not really be conducive to good sales. One, or maybe two I could live with, but dozens? No.
    -1
  • @Duff165 I would respond to your ignorance, but I really, really dislike this "new" comment system that Tom's has foisted on us.
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  • 56281 said:
    @Duff165 I would respond to your ignorance, but I really, really dislike this "new" comment system that Tom's has foisted on us.


    Agreed. Now it is truly screwed more than ever.
    WTH is will the continuously scrolled unrelated articles, dropped newlines and just plain broken comments.
    0
  • 1551849 said:
    I find it hard to believe that the author has had "literally dozens of SSd's die" on him over the years. ... One, or maybe two I could live with, but dozens? No.

    For the typical user that only has a few systems at the same time, yes. For someone who works with dozens of systems, the chance for one of them to fail goes up. Constantly building, testing, and reconfiguring machines means you're constantly imaging and re-imaging drives, which wears them out much faster than normal. Perhaps it was a little exaggerated, but it's definitely possible
    2
  • Lol. All of the work that went into making page 5 seem like some super-complicated test. That is just HDTune, which can be ran with the click of a button and hardly requires and entire page and horrible graph for explanation.
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  • Question: Can this drive be used on a personal laptop??
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  • 1553256 said:
    Question: Can this drive be used on a personal laptop??


    I don't see why not
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  • There's actually a pretty huge difference between MLC-SLC translator based emulation and the way that tlc can behave electronically(physically) as SLC independently at the bottom of the translation layer. MLC-emulation has a partially positive and partially negative effect on translator stability, but with a robust controller(Marvell), the net effect on reliability is positive.With TLC as SLC, the effect is nearly perfectly proportionate to having SLC physically present.In fact, it is possible(with manufacturer tools) to take just about any TLC device like a 64GB usb flash drive and make it electronically indistinguishable(nearly) to a ~22Gb TLC flash drive in respect to performance, endurance, etc...MLC emulation is much more nuanced.
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  • @Duff165. It's very believable that the author could have had dozens of SSD failures, especially if he used some brands like Mushkin. We were building systems using their 120GB SSDs and had nearly 75% failure rate within the first 6 months. Since then, we have used primarily Kingston with a few Intel and Crucial SSDs and haven't had a single failure since.
    -1
  • @Duff165. It's very believable that the author could have had dozens of SSD failures, especially if he used some brands like Mushkin. We were building systems using their 120GB SSDs and had nearly 75% failure rate within the first 6 months. Since then, we have used primarily Kingston with a few Intel and Crucial SSDs and haven't had a single failure since.
    -1
  • Since the major difference between the X210 and the Extreme II is the firmware, can you please test the Extreme II on the new DriveMaster TRIM test and see if they behave the same? SanDisk just turned into a new favorable option for me for my next drive.
    2