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Comparison Table And Test Setup

New Enterprise Hard Drives: 6 Gb/s SAS And 200 MB/s
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Comparison Table

Manufacturer
Fujitsu
Fujitsu
Hitachi
Model
MBD2 RC seriesMBE2 RC seriesUltrastar C10K300
Model Number
MBD2300RCMBE2147RCHUC103030CSS600
Form Factor
2.5"2.5"2.5"
Capacity
300GB147GB300GB
Spindle Speed
10,000 RPM15,000 RPM10,000 RPM
Other Capacities
147GB 73.5GB147GB
Platters
2
2
2
Cache
16MB16MB64MB
TCQ/NCQ
YesYesYes
Interface
SAS/600SAS/600SAS/600
Surface Temperature
57°C58°C56°C
Specified Operating Temperature
0-55°C0-55°C5-55°C
Specified idle Power
3.4W4.1W3.4W
Measured idle Power
3.5W4.2W13.4W
Operating Shock (2 ms, read)
100 G (100 ms)100 G (100 ms)60 G
Warranty
5 years5 years5 years

               

Manufacturer
Seagate
Seagate
Seagate
Model
ConstellationConstellationSavvio 10K.3
Model number
ST9500530NSST9500430SS ST9300603SS
Form Factor
2.5"2.5"2.5"
Capacity
500GB500GB300GB
Spindle Speed
7,200 RPM7,200 RPM10,000 RPM
Other Capacities
160GB160GB146GB
Platters
3
3
2
Cache
32MB16MB16MB
TCQ/NCQ
YesYesYes
Interface
SAS/600SAS/600SAS/600
Surface Temperature
47°C49°C58°C
Specified Operating Temperature
5-55°C5-55°C5-55°C
Specified Idle Power
2.6W2.9W3.5W
Measured Idle Power
3.0W5.1W5.9W
Operating Shock (2 ms, read)
70 G 
70 G 
70G
Warranty
5 years5 years5 years

                  

Manufacturer
Seagate
Seagate
Seagate
Model
Savvio 15K.2Cheetah NS.2Cheetah 15K.7
Model Number
ST9146852SSST3600002SSST3600057SS
Form Factor
2.5"3.5"3.5"
Capacity
146GB600GB600GB
Spindle Speed
15,000 RPM10,000 RPM15,000 RPM
Other Capacities
73GB300GB, 450GB300GB, 450GB
Platters
2
4
4
Cache
16MB16MB16MB
TCQ/NCQ
YesYesYes
Interface
SAS/600SAS/600SAS/600
Surface Temperature
59°C48°C60°C
Specified Operating temperature
5-55°C5-55°C5-55°C
Specified Idle Power
4.1W6.2W11.7W
Measured idle Power
6.0W7.5W13.2W
Operating Shock (2 ms read)
60 G60 G60 G
Warranty
5 years5 years5 years

 
Test Setup

System Hardware
Hardware
Details
CPU
Intel Core i7-920 (45nm, 2.66 GHz, 8MB L2 Cache)
Motherboard (Socket 1366)
Supermicro X8SAX
Revision: 1.1, Chipset: Intel X58 + ICH10R, BIOS: 1.0B
RAM
3GB DDR3-1333 Corsair CM3X1024-1333C9DHX
HDD
Seagate NL35 400GB
ST3400832NS, 7,200 RPM, SATA/150, 8MB Cache
Power Supply
OCZ EliteXstream 800W
OCZ800EXS-EU
Benchmarks
Performance Measurements
h2benchw 3.12
PCMark Vantage 1.0
I/O Performance
IOMeter 2006.07.27
Fileserver-Benchmark
Webserver-Benchmark
Database-Benchmark
Workstation-Benchmark
Streaming Reads
Streaming Writes
System Software and Drivers
Driver
Details
Operating System
Windows Vista Ultimate SP1
Intel Chipset
Chipset Installation Utility 9.1.0.1007
AMD Graphics
Radeon 8.12
Intel Matrix Storage
8.7.0.1007
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  • -2 Hide
    falchard , September 18, 2009 8:19 AM
    The thing I really like about the Fujitsu and Hitachi models is they are freaking cheap.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , September 18, 2009 10:30 AM
    "Compared to the 2,000GB units available in the desktop
    space, this appears almost pathetic."

    Seagate Constellation ES is 2TB ...

    Also, we working to design a 1.5 Petabyte storage system at work ... either drive form factor provides plenty of bandwidth when you use hundreds of drives. But the 3.5" drives offer much greater rack density ... nearly 100TB per 4U.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , September 18, 2009 10:50 AM
    These are SAS drives but they test it on a motherboard with only SATA controller and I can't see any expansion cards in the hardware setup, what am I missing?
  • -5 Hide
    amnotanoobie , September 18, 2009 1:22 PM
    robsyThese are SAS drives but they test it on a motherboard with only SATA controller and I can't see any expansion cards in the hardware setup, what am I missing?


    Me thinks they were trying to fulfill the dreams of some people using it in a desktop. They should have added Crysis load times since it is already in a desktop setup.
  • -5 Hide
    Anonymous , September 18, 2009 1:51 PM
    My goodness! Those drives need some cooling, or you could burn yourself on them!
    Besides, high temperatures are not good for drives!
  • -5 Hide
    xeensd , September 18, 2009 2:24 PM
    147 degrees! Wow And I thought my 1.5tb Seagates were hot at 105!
  • 1 Hide
    MU_Engineer , September 18, 2009 2:46 PM
    robsyThese are SAS drives but they test it on a motherboard with only SATA controller and I can't see any expansion cards in the hardware setup, what am I missing?


    The SuperMicro motherboard has a built-in SAS controller. It has to, as SAS hard drives do not work with an SATA controller.
  • 1 Hide
    K2N hater , September 18, 2009 2:46 PM
    robsyThese are SAS drives but they test it on a motherboard with only SATA controller and I can't see any expansion cards in the hardware setup, what am I missing?

    I doubt these tests used a SATA controller simply because the it would rather refuse to detect the drives.

    No I/O charts? Charts for price per GB and per I/O would be nice.
  • 1 Hide
    MU_Engineer , September 18, 2009 2:51 PM
    MU_EngineerThe SuperMicro motherboard has a built-in SAS controller. It has to, as SAS hard drives do not work with an SATA controller.


    I screwed up, the X8SAX does not have an onboard SAS controller- some other UP Xeon 35xx boards from SuperMicro do. Tom's had to use an add-in card somewhere as the ICH10R SATA controller in the X8SAX does not support SAS drives. I bet they used one of the SAS/600 cards they wrote a little article about earlier.
  • 0 Hide
    Area51 , September 18, 2009 3:48 PM
    I would have loved to have the Intel x-25E 64GB drive to included as a reference to this benchmark. I know its not SAS, but the SAS controllers do support it so if the proper decision is based on performance it should not matter if its SATA os SAS.
  • -2 Hide
    mrubermonkey , September 19, 2009 1:54 AM
    Your test setup is missing the hardware you used to connect those drives to the rest of the test system as in a controller card or on board controller.
  • -1 Hide
    Andraxxus , September 19, 2009 10:47 AM
    Good info.
  • -1 Hide
    JohnnyLucky , September 19, 2009 11:28 PM
    Hmmm....For the IT environment it sounds very interesting. What about gamers and home users? What's in their future?
  • 0 Hide
    Area51 , September 21, 2009 5:04 AM
    JohnnyLuckyHmmm....For the IT environment it sounds very interesting. What about gamers and home users? What's in their future?

    SSD's!
  • 0 Hide
    wuzy , September 22, 2009 12:24 AM
    For those asking about their relativity to MLC & SLC based SSD.
    Note, difference between different platforms & controller should be minimal when testing for pure disk performance.

    Here are the typical numbers for Intel X25-E:
    IOMeter 2003.05.10 Database - >4800 IOps avg. (drops to ~3200 @Q64)
    IOMeter 2003.05.10 File Server - >3600 IOps avg.
    IOMeter 2003.05.10 Web Server - >5800 IOps avg.
    Source: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-x25-e-ssd,2158-5.html

    For Intel X25-M:
    IOMeter 2003.05.10 Database - >3000 IOPs (Q1-Q16)then ~1000 IOps @Q64
    IOMeter 2003.05.10 File Server - >1000 IOps avg.
    Source: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-x25-e-ssd,2158-5.html
    PCMark Vantage HDD Suite - >28000 (applies to all Indilinx & Intel)
    Source: http://www.anandtech.com/storage/showdoc.aspx?i=3631&p=24

    For VelociRaptor:
    PCMark Vantage HDD Suite - 6600
    Source: http://www.anandtech.com/storage/showdoc.aspx?i=3631&p=24

    Weight those numbers against numbers found in this review.

    Basically the conclusion from the numbers I've gathered indicates the performance difference between 2.5" 15k vs. SLC-based SSD for database, file server and web server is day and night.
    I find the continued offering of 15k RPM HDDs for enterprise usage is APPALLING even when $/GB has been factored in. The reason for slow uptake of SSD in those market is due to companies like EMC overcharging for SSD solutions.

    And for those interested in desktop usage performance the difference between VelociRaptor and MLC-based SSD is selective in advantages. Look through individual HDD tests under PCMark Vantage to find out the difference in different usage areas.
  • 0 Hide
    Major7up , September 22, 2009 3:56 AM
    I still have several raptors that have performed admirably but I think I will start to phase them out soon, I like the smaller form factor.
  • 0 Hide
    pszilard , September 23, 2009 11:00 PM
    Well, with Corsair spec for its latest SSD being 100+ years of life, I just don't see the point in going via SAS vs SSD. Spinning platters at 15,000 rpm is going to wear bearings, something rotten, plus there is heat and power usage, whereas SSDs are low power and (almost) zero latency AND we don't have to purchase SAS controllers. They are also totally silent and there is no vibration. Plus SSDs are coming down in price. QED.
  • 1 Hide
    jowunger , September 24, 2009 4:50 AM
    I think it would have been a good idea to start this article about 'what' SAS means or is. Its not mentioned anywhere in this article.
  • 0 Hide
    platemoon , October 4, 2009 10:52 PM
    I love my two Fujitsu 300GB SAS 3Gb/s 15k rpm in RAID 0, but when I bought them I didn't realized that the connector is not like the SATA drivers. My motherboard is a MSI K9A2 Platinum and it includes 2 SAS ports and if you disable the Promise SAS controller in the BIOS you also disable the eSATA ports, which makes me wonder if they are eSATA or eSAS? Any way the thing is that the connection on this board is the same as SATA ports. I do have LSI MegaRAID SAS/SATA PCIe 4X Card and the cable that it came with it is a mini SAS connector with four SATA types connectors on the other side.
    Does anyone know why almost all SAS Card come with this type of cables instead of SAS 29 pins cables?
    Also I noticed that SAS drives have more data pins that SATA drives, actually twice data pins. And with the power pins added to the plug you can count 29 pins.
    Here is my concern, does that mean that I can connect one of this cables with 29 pins to the SAS hard drive and 2 SATA like connectors on the other side of the cable to a motherboard, and I can boost the performance of the hard drive up to 6 Gb/s because of the dual connection? Does that mean that 6Gb/s SAS drives could perform up to 12Gb/s because of the same configuration with that type of cable?
  • 0 Hide
    k12 , October 5, 2009 7:44 AM
    what is SAS??
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