SilverStone SX800-LTI PSU Review

Load Regulation, Hold-Up Time & Inrush Current

To learn more about our PSU tests and methodology, please check out How We Test Power Supply Units. 

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Primary Rails And 5VSB Load Regulation

Load Regulation testing is detailed here.

Hold-Up Time

Our hold-up time tests are described in detail here.

The hold-up time we measure is too low. Adding insult to injury, the power-good signal is inaccurate. This is unacceptable from any PSU, but especially one billed as high-end.

Inrush Current

For details on our inrush current testing, please click here.

The inrush current is normal given this unit's capacity.

Load Regulation And Efficiency Measurements

The first set of tests reveals the stability of the voltage rails and the SX800-LTI's efficiency. The applied load equals (approximately) 10 to 110 percent of the PSU's maximum load in increments of 10 percentage points.

We conducted two additional tests. During the first, we stressed the two minor rails (5V and 3.3V) with a high load, while the load at +12V was only 0.1A. This test reveals whether a PSU is compatible with Intel's C6/C7 sleep states or not. In the second test, we determined the maximum load the +12V rail could handle with minimal load on the minor rails.

Test #12V5V3.3V5VSBDC/AC (Watts)EfficiencyFan Speed
PSU Noise
Temps (In/Out)PF/AC Volts
14.822A1.955A1.982A0.980A79.74190.530%0 RPM
<6.0 dB(A)
42.05°C0.959
12.068V5.106V3.321V5.087V88.08238.61°C115.19V
210.676A2.940A2.985A1.181A159.65593.304%0 RPM<6.0 dB(A)42.61°C0.980
12.062V5.099V3.315V5.076V171.11338.80°C115.19V
316.900A3.440A3.504A1.380A239.85093.231%0 RPM<6.0 dB(A)42.93°C0.987
12.058V5.087V3.306V5.062V257.26539.11°C115.19V
423.111A3.935A3.998A1.580A319.71593.023%955 RPM30.3 dB(A)40.08°C0.989
12.053V5.079V3.299V5.052V343.69345.07°C115.18V
528.980A4.932A5.006A1.784A399.66992.477%990 RPM30.6 dB(A)40.86°C0.991
12.049V5.071V3.293V5.041V432.18147.46°C115.19V
634.851A5.925A6.023A1.985A479.60190.676%1780 RPM42.0 dB(A)41.63°C0.992
12.046V5.064V3.287V5.030V528.92050.94°C115.19V
740.731A6.928A7.045A2.190A559.59689.835%2080 RPM46.2 dB(A)42.68°C0.994
12.042V5.056V3.278V5.019V622.91753.02°C115.19V
846.625A7.925A8.069A2.395A639.52989.093%2170 RPM47.5 dB(A)43.19°C0.995
12.035V5.049V3.271V5.006V717.81954.39°C115.20V
952.954A8.439A8.603A2.399A719.61788.286%2220 RPM47.6 dB(A)43.85°C0.996
12.029V5.042V3.265V5.000V815.09656.93°C115.21V
1059.222A8.941A9.112A2.500A799.40987.563%2230 RPM47.6 dB(A)45.60°C0.996
12.026V5.036V3.259V4.993V912.95361.71°C115.21V
1165.896A8.952A9.127A2.505A879.34486.806%2230 RPM47.6 dB(A)46.16°C0.997
12.021V5.030V3.253V4.986V1013.00362.98°C115.22V
CL10.098A10.013A10.005A0.004A85.31688.365%0 RPM0 dB(A)51.19°C0.960
12.078V5.091V3.312V5.107V96.54944.86°C115.21V
CL265.774A1.003A1.002A1.002A804.71088.052%2220 RPM47.6 dB(A)44.67°C0.996
12.031V5.051V3.269V5.031V913.90758.29°C115.22V

Load regulation is tight on all rails (easily within the 3% region that SilverStone promises). The efficiency levels we observe are amazing under light and mid-range loads. However, under full load, the SX800-LTI lands well short of the 90% demanded by 80 PLUS' Titanium specification. Then again, we run our tests at temperatures much higher than the 23°C 80 PLUS uses for characterization.

The PSU's noise at up to typical loads is low enough. However, under 60% load (of its max-rated capacity), the fan is loud at 42 dB(A). Typically, larger fans spin at fewer rotations per minute to achieve the same airflow as smaller fans. Unfortunately, though, dense high-capacity PSUs generate heat that's difficult to exhaust. At a maximum speed of 2230 RPM, our equipment registers 47.6 dB(A).

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  • shrapnel_indie
    I know a guy that used to work for SLM at one time in his life. On one of the products for the company brands owned, he could mod it (it was a musical instrument amplifier) for just a couple of pennies and could have saved the company large sums of money on warranty work and improve reliability. He proposed the change, and it was denied because it broke the price-point, and warranties would cover any issues anyway.

    When bean-counters run the show, products will suffer, just so the price-point isn't exceeded and (now days particularly, immediate) profits are maximized. Makes me wonder if Silverstone listened to their bean-counters a little too much.
    0
  • Aris_Mp
    The thing I appreciate in SilverStone is that they didn't follow the marketing war in the warranty periods. For me it is really weird to see 10-12 years warranty in PSUs. Now with the mining craziness many companies are trying to find ways to get out of this.
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  • seanwilson5274
    why did an ad leading to this article popped up automatically on my windows 10 screen? I don't like being spammed, and even less so, when it comes in as sneaky as this.
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  • derekullo
    It is Tom's way of encouraging you to block ads.

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    Any of those 3 can make Toms ad free.
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  • SilverStone Guy
    Anonymous said:
    When bean-counters run the show, products will suffer, just so the price-point isn't exceeded and (now days particularly, immediate) profits are maximized. Makes me wonder if Silverstone listened to their bean-counters a little too much.


    If bean-counters had their way, a PSU like this would have never been released in the first place! It's a very niche product that will not sell in significant quantities. Implementing sleeve bearing fan was not a cost-cutting move, it was out of necessity to keep the PSU noise low for the intended applications. At the time of development, FDB version of this fan was not yet available to us.
    0