Build Your Own: Single-Slot GeForce GTX 750 Ti

Wrap-Up: Single-Slot GeForce GTX 750 Ti

Yes, this was only an experiment. But we couldn't resist the urge to try something that Nvidia's board partners should have tried right out of the gate. It proves that you can use the heat sink from a 50 W card (source by AMD, no less) to cool Nvidia's GM107 GPU in a single-slot form factor. Now think about a solution designed for GeForce GTX 750 Ti, rather than tacked on crudely. A better-fitting implementation designed to fill the PCB space would almost certainly facilitate better thermal performance, likely eliminating the delta between our reference and single-slot GeForce GTX 750 Ti cards, which was a result of lower GPU Boost clock rates.

Truly, our solution isn't optimized. It was another proof-of-concept that involved some craftiness. But it works, despite the minor performance hit and the...shall we say mis-matched brand colors?

At this point, it's up to the board partners as to when we might see a single-slot, low-profile, or passively-cooled GeForce GTX 750 Ti. The HTPC community would undoubtedly cheer, though we're not sure the segment is large enough to compel fast action.

But there is a lot of interest coming from the small form factor space. Right now, we see most vendors tucking dual-slot cards into cases built to accommodate them, if only barely. A single-slot version is even more flexible. We've shown that passive and low-profile cooling are both possible with the 60 W GM107 processor. The GPU is capable of a solid experience at 1920x1080. Hopefully, it's only a matter of time before both derivatives emerge, empowering PC enthusiasts with new ways to build attractive console alternatives.

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  • silverblue
    And now... fitting a Titan/780 Ti cooler to a 290X. ;)
    18
  • Other Comments
  • de5_Roy
    i've been waiting to read it for a while. it was very good.
    one aspect of gcn based radeons is that despite their low power use in entry level cards, all of them use higher amount of pwoer during bluray playback. both kepler and maxwell (gm107) use quite less. a single slot, low profile operation, a card with gpu like gm107 will be very suitable for htpc. not to mention the sheer amount of gaming performance advantage over other gfx card around the same power use. hopefully, the future 20nm gpus will introduce even more performance under the same power use.
    4
  • brarboy
    Amd and Nvidia in same boat. You really got my attention here :D
    8
  • silverblue
    And now... fitting a Titan/780 Ti cooler to a 290X. ;)
    18
  • AMD Radeon
    Sorry i edit this
    0
  • dish_moose
    I get a little cautious about making holes in multi layer pcbs and using metal screws. Without knowing the power plane structure and clearances, you gamble shorting out internal layers if you are not lucky/careful.-Bruce
    9
  • jamesedgeuk2000
    I think I have noticed a flaw with what you guys did here. The card only supply's power to the fan it doesn't regulate PWM or sense RPM, so am I correct in assuming that it's using voltage regulation to control fan speed and therefore doing it blind based on it's temperature curve? If so then as you have replaced the standard fan with a much weaker one you should really consider raising the fan curve to compensate.
    4
  • CodeMatias
    Why not use a K2000 cooler? also nvidia small die so it might work better, and K2000 is ~80W so it should cool the 750ti just fine.
    1
  • CodeMatias
    Quote:
    And now... fitting a Titan/780 Ti cooler to a 290X. ;)
    Asus already did... It doesn't work, the 290X just draws too much power
    1
  • Captain75
    I need a low profile version of the card though -_-
    3
  • AndrewJacksonZA
    Anonymous said:
    And now... fitting a Titan/780 Ti cooler to a 290X. ;)
    Yes silverblue, yes! :-)
    3
  • Onus
    I'm sorry, but this is NOT a "low profile" card. It is single-slot, but not low-profile. It needs to be able to fit in an InWin BK655.300 (or similar mITX case) to be low-profile. For that, the circuit board itself must be short.
    2
  • FormatC
    Quote:
    Why not use a K2000 cooler? also nvidia small die so it might work better, and K2000 is ~80W so it should cool the 750ti just fine.

    The cooler doesn't fit. Some caps and coils are too high and the distance between the holes is not compatible. I've tried other FirePro cards but it was not possible too...

    Quote:
    The card only supply's power to the fan it doesn't regulate PWM or sense RPM, so am I correct in assuming that it's using voltage regulation to control fan speed

    This fan is voltage controlled, right. The goal was to use Boost to limit the temps and show you that you lost only a little bit performance. I had no non-Ti in my hands to ise it. This slower card is really perfect for this kind of cooling :(

    Quote:
    I get a little cautious about making holes in multi layer pcbs and using metal screws.

    It is one of the rules, that around this holes is nothing. You have always 1 mm reserve and more ;)
    3
  • Pedasc
    Just to echo Onus the AMD card they took the cooler off of is "low profile". This card still has a full size PCB, it is not "low profile".
    1
  • FormatC
    The goal was only to show, that a low-profile and single-slot card might work. It's clear that nobody can take a saw and modify the reference board... :D
    4
  • AndrewJacksonZA
    Anonymous said:
    It's clear that nobody can take a saw and modify the reference board... :D
    <obligatory>Chuck Norris can.</obligatory> ;-)
    6
  • de5_Roy
    Anonymous said:
    Anonymous said:
    It's clear that nobody can take a saw and modify the reference board... :D
    <obligatory>Chuck Norris can.</obligatory> ;-)


    chuck norris does not need a saw to modify the reference nvidia pcb down to low profile form factor. he simply throws the card in the air and roundhouse kicks it to cutoff the excess height and into to the motherboard's pcie x16 slot. the shock wave from the roundhouse kick then causes the case re-assemble itself and the pc to start.
    8
  • vertexx
    Now if only someone would come out with a single-slot low-profile version. That would really be something!
    5
  • renz496
    Anonymous said:
    I'm sorry, but this is NOT a "low profile" card. It is single-slot, but not low-profile. It needs to be able to fit in an InWin BK655.300 (or similar mITX case) to be low-profile. For that, the circuit board itself must be short.


    then get this card and replace the heatsink

    http://www.galaxytech.com/__EN_GB__/Product2/ProductDetail?proID=517&isStop=0&isPack=False&isPow=False
    0
  • Onus
    Yeah, it can't be double-slot. I couldn't tell if it has the half-height bracket though, and the spec sheet doesn't list it as an accessory.
    0
  • RedJaron
    Anonymous said:
    Quote:
    And now... fitting a Titan/780 Ti cooler to a 290X. ;)
    Asus already did... It doesn't work, the 290X just draws too much power

    The reason this didn't work is because the GK110 chip is quite a bit larger than Hawai'i. In Asus' case, two of the heat pipes don't even touch the chip and were useless.


    There's no reason a 780 type cooling solution can't be used, but you need to address the smaller surface area on the chip for optimal heat transference.
    3