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Adata DashDrive Durable HD710 (750 GB)

USB 3.0-Based 2.5" Hard Disks From Adata, Hitachi, And WD
By , Achim Roos

Adata's USB 3.0-based DashDrive Durable HD710 is available in capacities of 500 GB, 750 GB, and 1 TB. You can find the external case highlighted by yellow, blue, or black, and there's no price difference between the colors. We just so happened to test a blue 750 GB model, which sells for just over $100 on Amazon. We liked that the drive's USB 3.0 cable is integrated, and thus cannot be forgotten or, worse, lost.

The DashDrive Durable HD710 is ruggedized, and Adata isn’t shy about advertising that fact. Its massive case sports diagonally-printed stripes that make us think of highway warning signs. According to its manufacturer, the HD710 conforms to the international standard IEC 529 IPX7, surviving a 30-minute immersion in 1 m (3 ft) of water. It can also survive a drop test, according to MIL-STD-810G 516.5, which is equivalent to a fall from a table to the floor.

Somewhat disappointingly for such a purportedly tough drive, its warranty runs out after a mere three years.

Robustness is what sets the Adata drive apart from the other two products in our story. It's suitable for taxing operating conditions that might render other mechanical devices unusable. Inside, Adata employs a 5400 RPM hard drive, which assures modest (but not particularly noteworthy) performance. Its sequential read and write rates of 77.8 MB/s earn the DashDrive a last-place finish amongst our three test candidates. Then again, that's not too far down the ladder. Western Digital's My Passport achieves a slightly higher result that hovers around 83 MB/s.

In contrast to its competitors, Adata's DashDrive Durable HD710 does not come with software. Its bundle is limited to a quick-start guide and the USB 3.0 cable built right into the external enclosure. Two tools, OStoGo and UFDtoGo, can be downloaded from the Adata website. But they're relatively mundane offerings: OStoGo copies the files off of a Windows 7 DVD on the external drive, and then modifies them in such a way that you can install Windows from the HD710. UFDtoGo synchronizes personal data (like email and browser favorites) between a PC and Adata's product.

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Top Comments
  • 16 Hide
    thezooloomaster , August 31, 2012 6:45 AM
    alidanhow fast is usb3? i mean real world, say you put a ssd in the best enclosure, what would it do?


    The theoretical bandwidth of USB 3.0 is roughly 625 MB/s, but this speed is rarely achieved -- even with the fastest hardware -- because the bus relies on a protocol for transferring data which is poorly optimized and eats up a chunk of the bandwidth.
Other Comments
  • 0 Hide
    alidan , August 31, 2012 5:48 AM
    how fast is usb3? i mean real world, say you put a ssd in the best enclosure, what would it do?
  • 16 Hide
    thezooloomaster , August 31, 2012 6:45 AM
    alidanhow fast is usb3? i mean real world, say you put a ssd in the best enclosure, what would it do?


    The theoretical bandwidth of USB 3.0 is roughly 625 MB/s, but this speed is rarely achieved -- even with the fastest hardware -- because the bus relies on a protocol for transferring data which is poorly optimized and eats up a chunk of the bandwidth.
  • 7 Hide
    shahrooz , August 31, 2012 8:00 AM
    alidanhow fast is usb3? i mean real world, say you put a ssd in the best enclosure, what would it do?

    I get like 70~140 MB/s (copying from WD my passport 1TB to my WD HDD (7200rpm black))
    and I get 30~40 MB/s copying from USB 2 WD my book 2TB to ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
  • -6 Hide
    willyroc , August 31, 2012 8:58 AM
    shahroozI get like 70~140 MB/s (copying from WD my passport 1TB to my WD HDD (7200rpm black))and I get 30~40 MB/s copying from USB 2 WD my book 2TB to ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    USB 3 is more than twice as fast as USB 2.
  • 0 Hide
    tridon , August 31, 2012 12:01 PM
    I'm sitting here, daydreaming about a Velociraptor external drive. Maybe that would be able to use the USB 3's capacity better, or maybe something's slightly wrong in my head for wishing for such a thing.
  • 9 Hide
    ojas , August 31, 2012 12:21 PM
    willyrocUSB 3 is more than twice as fast as USB 2.

    Yeah but you're still limited to both the source and destination drive's read/write speed. So when copying from a HDD to an HDD, you're unlikely to exceed 140 MBps.

    If you're copying from a SATA 3 SSD to a USB 3.0 SSD, then yes, you could see much faster speeds.
  • 2 Hide
    jaquith , August 31, 2012 1:03 PM
    USB 3.0 + UASP (or) eSATA (or) Internal (SATA 2 or 3) HDD.

    USB 3.0 in most instances isn't ready for prime time for external HDD's, and without UASP the queuing is too slow; UASP solves this problem. Otherwise without UASP IMO use eSATA or a backup internal SATA HDD.

    More info see TH article June 20th, 2012 - http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/usb-3-uas-turbo,3215.html

    Note: The Hitachi Touro fails (BSOD) in Windows 8.
  • 8 Hide
    ubercake , August 31, 2012 2:29 PM
    So... Theoretically USB 3.0 is faster than eSata, but in practice eSata is still the way to go?
  • 7 Hide
    LukeCWM , August 31, 2012 3:18 PM
    ubercakeSo... Theoretically USB 3.0 is faster than eSata, but in practice eSata is still the way to go?

    Yes.
  • -2 Hide
    alidan , August 31, 2012 3:35 PM
    shahroozI get like 70~140 MB/s (copying from WD my passport 1TB to my WD HDD (7200rpm black))and I get 30~40 MB/s copying from USB 2 WD my book 2TB to ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


    that 1tb is in a better case than the 2tb
    what i have noticed with usb 3 is that, yes while its theoretical max is higher than current hdd and ssds should achieve, the fact of the matter is they never hit that peak.

    thats why im wondering, with an ssd, what is the best we can get usb3 to.
    you proved that current normal hdds in a good case do not have a problem in usb 3, and for that i thank you.
  • 3 Hide
    invlem , August 31, 2012 5:00 PM
    ubercakeSo... Theoretically USB 3.0 is faster than eSata, but in practice eSata is still the way to go?


    Well Yes and No... It really depends on your application, eSata may be faster, but USB is still more usable/universal.

    If you're planning on using the drive for back up purposes eSata and know all the devices you are going to use it with support eSata, then it is probably the better solution.

    If you want it for mobility purposes, transferring files to various destinations, USB is more reliable. First these usb3 drives are self powered, meaning no AC adapters to worry about, the PC provides the power, also since its backwards compatible with usb2.0 100% of the devices you want to plug into will work, eSata is great but its not nearly as widely adopted as usb... I'd rather transfer my files slowly at usb2.0 speeds to my destination system, than not at all due to a lack of eSata ports.
  • 0 Hide
    alidan , September 1, 2012 3:13 AM
    invlemWell Yes and No... It really depends on your application, eSata may be faster, but USB is still more usable/universal. If you're planning on using the drive for back up purposes eSata and know all the devices you are going to use it with support eSata, then it is probably the better solution. If you want it for mobility purposes, transferring files to various destinations, USB is more reliable. First these usb3 drives are self powered, meaning no AC adapters to worry about, the PC provides the power, also since its backwards compatible with usb2.0 100% of the devices you want to plug into will work, eSata is great but its not nearly as widely adopted as usb... I'd rather transfer my files slowly at usb2.0 speeds to my destination system, than not at all due to a lack of eSata ports.


    from what i understand.
    a usb3 case that takes full advantage of the harddive is hard to find, much less cheap
    how ever a esata case can be found for under 30$

    so really it comes to how you are going to use the hdd...

    personally i want to take all moving parts out of my computer besides fans, so i could go with esata and be happy, but if you want more or less a guarentee that you will be able to hood that drive up to almost anything you can think of, even a bad usb3 case would be better.
  • 0 Hide
    Fennec , September 2, 2012 6:52 AM
    I have a few USB 2,5 drives and the best transfer rate I ever had was 20 mo/s
  • 0 Hide
    Fennec , September 2, 2012 7:01 AM
    I have a few USB 2,5 drives and the best transfer rate I ever had was 20 mo/s
  • 0 Hide
    azraa , September 2, 2012 10:44 PM
    @Fennec
    You probably have USB 2.0 devices, paired with a motherboard with a not really good (or without proper drivers) Chipset. Most USB 2 can reach up to 30 to 40, as stated earlier, but this is with higher tier chipsets.
  • 0 Hide
    palladin9479 , September 4, 2012 12:50 AM
    A note to some people about eSATA, as of SATA 2.0 it's no different from regular SATA. It has a different connector as it supports a shielded cable that allows for longer connections, it also allows for a slightly higher signaling voltage. In all other aspects it's identical to using a SATA connector on the inside of your PC. You can find eSATA brackets for $15 USD which allow you to turn any SATA port into an eSATA port, most BIOS's even support the disconnect command for it (set port to removable). For that reason alone eSATA will be the better bus for bulk data transfer, it having proper DMA support (vs the hacked method of USB) is icing on the cake.
  • 0 Hide
    vkg1 , September 16, 2012 2:47 PM
    Looks like if you already have a Firewire 800 drive and card then there isn't much reason to drop coin for a USB 3.0 drive.
  • 0 Hide
    thezefen , February 22, 2013 2:13 PM
    i have a question, why my adata hd710 only can transfer at max speed 24mbps.
    even when i plug the hdd into my usb3 slot
    anyone can help me?