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Results: Grayscale Tracking

VP2770-LED Vs. S27B970D: 27" Monitors At 2560x1440
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All of the IPS panels we’ve tested recently display excellent grayscale tracking, even at stock settings. It’s important that the color of white be consistently neutral at all light levels from darkest to brightest. Grayscale performance impacts color accuracy with regard to the secondary colors; cyan, magenta, and yellow. Since computer monitors typically have no color or tint adjustment, accurate grayscale is key.

ViewSonic VP2770-LED

To perform a manual calibration of the VP2770-LED, we employed the User color mode. The other modes lock out the RGB adjustments. Selecting the sRGB preset also prevents use of the Contrast and Brightness sliders. The pre-calibration chart below reflects the User mode with the RGB controls set to their default positions.

The color of white tends a bit towards blue as the signal level rises. The error becomes visible at 40 percent, and hits a max of just over six Delta E at 100 percent. This is a slightly cool tone and an average out-of-box result.

After calibrating the VP2770-LED, the grayscale tracking is quite excellent. Only small adjustments need to be made to bring everything in line.

Our final settings are Red 98, Green 100, and Blue 94, with contrast set to 70 and Brightness to 42. This is perfect tracking with an average Delta E error of only 0.8604. It doesn’t really get much better than this.

Samsung S27B970D

As mentioned earlier, the S27B970D offers several unique options with its color modes. The first chart is the factory-calibrated mode. As previously stated, the only way to adjust this is to use the Natural Color Expert software with a supported color probe. The chart below represents the monitor in its default state.

The result is somewhat green in hue, with the error increasing as the light level goes up. The error becomes visible at 50 percent and it hits a max Delta E of just under six. Given a choice, we’d rather see blue errors than green because the human eye is most sensitive to green, and therefore better able to detect that error.

This is the Standard mode measurement. The green error is still present, but slightly lower. Visibility doesn’t occur until 80 percent, and the max Delta E is now under four.

If you don’t plan to calibrate the S27B970D, we recommend Standard mode. The color is pretty accurate without adjustment, and you’ll be able to control brightness and contrast.

After a manual calibration, the results are just a hair short of perfect.

Calibrating the Standard mode produces one of the best charts we’ve ever seen. Only zero and 10 percent are over one Delta E, and that can even be attributed to instrument error. While the human eye cannot distinguish between the Samsung and ViewSonic monitors we're measuring, we remain very impressed by this level of accuracy.

All of the monitors we’ve tested recently show an extremely low grayscale error right out of the box. While we recommend calibration of any panel, you can still enjoy an accurate image from any of these screens at their stock settings.

The Samsung S27B970D is the only panel to measure under three (average Delta E). This result is for the monitor’s Standard mode; the factory-calibrated mode measured higher, with an average Delta E of 3.76.

After calibration, both the Samsung and ViewSonic panels had essentially no grayscale error. This is near-perfect performance.

In most cases, calibration will yield a reasonable improvement over the stock image. With the monitors reviewed here, the improvement is more significant. It should be noted that Samsung’s Natural Color Expert software was not able to achieve a grayscale error this low. The best we could do was 2.14 Delta E average. The obvious conclusion is that a manual calibration is preferable for the S27B970D.

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  • 32 Hide
    jupiter optimus maximus , February 14, 2013 3:47 AM
    Why not do a review on those $330 Korean 1440P monitors that enthusiasts talk about? I like to see what i am missing with the extra $900. Really i'm serious i really want to know what justifies the 1 grand price tag.
  • 21 Hide
    cangelini , February 14, 2013 4:04 AM
    jupiter optimus maximusWhy not do a review on those $330 Korean 1440P monitors that enthusiasts talk about? I like to see what i am missing with the extra $900. Really i'm serious i really want to know what justifies the 1 grand price tag.

    It's coming. We're ramping up our display coverage, so we took note of the requests after the last display piece and put in the requests. You'll see this soon. Of course, if there are any other requests from you guys, do let us know. Christian is doing a phenomenal job of applying his extensive experience on Tom's Hardware.
  • 11 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 14, 2013 3:25 AM
    Quote:
    Why wouldn't you want a QHD screen like one of these two?
    Everything gets smaller.


    So increase the DPI scaling ?
Other Comments
  • 11 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 14, 2013 3:25 AM
    Quote:
    Why wouldn't you want a QHD screen like one of these two?
    Everything gets smaller.


    So increase the DPI scaling ?
  • 3 Hide
    MauveCloud , February 14, 2013 3:41 AM
    BigMack70I'm glad to see 1440p monitors getting some attention, but I just don't see the prices of these being justifiable to most users over the USA-based Korean 1440p IPS panels that are starting to become more numerous.$800-1200 is just nuts for anyone using these for home use or gaming, IMO.


    Agreed. I bought a Dell U2711 a few months ago, but if something forced me to replace it, I'd probably go with one of those cheap Korean panels -- or a TN panel 2560x1440 monitor if somebody would actually make one - I doubt I'm the only one who likes the resolution but isn't so picky about color quality. I had no objection to the color quality on my Samsung P2770HD, and the color shifts of a TN panel are affected by the physical size of the monitor, not the resolution, right?
  • 32 Hide
    jupiter optimus maximus , February 14, 2013 3:47 AM
    Why not do a review on those $330 Korean 1440P monitors that enthusiasts talk about? I like to see what i am missing with the extra $900. Really i'm serious i really want to know what justifies the 1 grand price tag.
  • 21 Hide
    cangelini , February 14, 2013 4:04 AM
    jupiter optimus maximusWhy not do a review on those $330 Korean 1440P monitors that enthusiasts talk about? I like to see what i am missing with the extra $900. Really i'm serious i really want to know what justifies the 1 grand price tag.

    It's coming. We're ramping up our display coverage, so we took note of the requests after the last display piece and put in the requests. You'll see this soon. Of course, if there are any other requests from you guys, do let us know. Christian is doing a phenomenal job of applying his extensive experience on Tom's Hardware.
  • 2 Hide
    EzioAs , February 14, 2013 5:01 AM
    Dell's UltraSharp U2713HM is less than $600 in my country if we go by standard conversion. Would you guys say that's a good price?
  • 3 Hide
    festerovic , February 14, 2013 5:56 AM
    cangeliniIt's coming. We're ramping up our display coverage, so we took note of the requests after the last display piece and put in the requests. You'll see this soon. Of course, if there are any other requests from you guys, do let us know. Christian is doing a phenomenal job of applying his extensive experience on Tom's Hardware.

    That's great to hear, I agree with the others that the price of these models is too much to consider unless they were generating $$$s for me. $3-400 seems like the range I would be willing to spend on these. And as for the USA based korean cheap models, are there any legit retailers of these? Please point me at them.
  • 1 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , February 14, 2013 7:10 AM
    Just bought a ASUS VS278Q-P for $310. It's a 60Mz monitor and I do game, but I'm happy. My previous monitor lasted 8 years (Samsung SyncMaster 213T, bought it for $1k). I'll upgrade when this one dies, hopefully 4k/UHD will be affordable. Supposedly, only serious gamers can tell the difference between 60Hz and 120Hz. I'm not a serious gamer, so it works just fine for me. 120Hz monitors of that size are nearly twice the price.
  • 1 Hide
    mannam , February 14, 2013 7:26 AM
    Quote:
    It's coming. We're ramping up our display coverage, so we took note of the requests after the last display piece and put in the requests. You'll see this soon. Of course, if there are any other requests from you guys, do let us know. Christian is doing a phenomenal job of applying his extensive experience on Tom's Hardware.


    Here are the inexpensive $300-$400 27" korean monitor brands: Yamakasi Catleap, Achieva Shimian, Crossover, PCBank, Potalion, Auria

    "The reason these monitors are cheap - LG makes IPS panels for apple cinema displays. Apple only accepts grade A+ panels. That means the all the grade A,A-,B+, etc are not accepted and returned to LG. LG resells those IPS panels to other manufacturers. You can get the whole story on google if you're interested. In addition, you're getting no support and no manufacturers warranty."

    Source: http://www.mmorpg.com/gamelist.cfm?game=239&view=forums&post=5192222#5192222

    It would be really interesting to get a review of these monitors that go for 50% or less of the price of the Big Brand stuff. If it's even 85-90% quality compared to the big brands, then they are worth the plunge. :D 
  • 1 Hide
    ubercake , February 14, 2013 7:52 AM
    Personally, I was not impressed with the Auria monitor. My Acer HN274H TN monitor has better contrast. Viewing angles are far better on the Auria, but that's to be expected on an IPS. At any rate, I returned the Auria after a day of use because after many attempts to adjust the contrast/color, it didn't hold a candle to the colors or contrast on my TN. The Auria definitely had deeper black, but the in-betweens seemed to be missing no matter how I set the contrast and color. I honestly couldn't justify the tradeoff of higher resolution to lack of contrast. Maybe I got one of the LG B+ throw-away panels?
  • 1 Hide
    sanilmahambre , February 14, 2013 9:13 AM
    Don't want too much ? Think again!
  • 1 Hide
    wanderer11 , February 14, 2013 9:33 AM
    cangeliniIt's coming. We're ramping up our display coverage, so we took note of the requests after the last display piece and put in the requests. You'll see this soon. Of course, if there are any other requests from you guys, do let us know. Christian is doing a phenomenal job of applying his extensive experience on Tom's Hardware.

    Don't forget the Auria at Microcenter. Many Toms users, myself included, have them.
  • 1 Hide
    ZippyPeanut , February 14, 2013 10:33 AM
    $856.00 and $1,200

    Both 60 HZ

    No need to read any further.
  • 4 Hide
    warezme , February 14, 2013 1:08 PM
    I'm waiting for this or higher resolution in a 24" size monitor that has very, very narrow or no bezel, true 5ms response time and refresh rate of 120hz. Perhaps I'll live long enough to see one but I'm starting to doubt.
  • 2 Hide
    cknobman , February 14, 2013 1:10 PM
    I refuse to spend more than $400 on a computer monitor no matter what resolution it is running at.

    I just dont see QHD picking up any traction in the main consumer market until they get prices down to reasonable levels.

    Heck I can pick up two 1080p 23/24 inch panels for
  • 4 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , February 14, 2013 1:39 PM
    Hey Toms, you interested in an experiment where you cut off the bezels on 3 1080p monitors, and stick them together for a seamless experience ?
  • 2 Hide
    rush21hit , February 14, 2013 1:48 PM
    I understand the reason why Windows 7 had Magnifier Tools just recently as I move on from 1366x768 to 1980x1200. And these things at even higher res, I don't think my focus is that good even with Magnifier Tool...

    Even with my recent resolution, I experienced some hard time to adjust myself when gaming is involved. The HUGE screen about 60 inch from my eyes still hurts my respond. I'm too focused on what happen on the middle of the screen and never had a chance to look at details on corners, when I do, it's already too late...

    I don't think I'm ready for such resolutions, even if someday my rig is.
  • 1 Hide
    guzami77 , February 14, 2013 2:34 PM
    MauveCloudAgreed. I bought a Dell U2711 a few months ago, but if something forced me to replace it, I'd probably go with one of those cheap Korean panels -- or a TN panel 2560x1440 monitor if somebody would actually make one - I doubt I'm the only one who likes the resolution but isn't so picky about color quality. I had no objection to the color quality on my Samsung P2770HD, and the color shifts of a TN panel are affected by the physical size of the monitor, not the resolution, right?



    I have the Dell U2711 also. Im a very visually detailed person. Audio I cant tell the difference between low to mid, or mid to high end systems... but visually I notice. My friends and family dont notice visual details or color accuracy. They think my monitor was a waste of money, but I dont. You need to know yourself before making a purchase on these. Also, if your gaming, you'll need a beefy system.. the jump from 1080p requires more hardware than youd expect.
  • 4 Hide
    biggestinsect , February 14, 2013 2:55 PM
    I run a 3 monitor set-up; use it mostly for 3d modeling and CAD, and occasional gaming. 2048 by 1152 23" Samsung on the left; 32" Samsung TV in the middle and LG 23" IPS on the right.

    Want to replace this mess with 3 27" QHD IPS panels. VESA mounts are mandatory; minimal/no-bezel cases would be preferred. I don't see that combination of features available anywhere.

    Also at $700 - $1000 dollars apiece it would be impossible for me to get all three at the same time. I could swing the cash for three of the Korean panels but spending that kind of money on a scary warranty, quality gamble is a bit un-nerving.

    So I guess some comprehensive reviews of the lesser panels and comparisons to the name brand monitors would be extremely helpful for me at this point. I could have worse problems!
  • 3 Hide
    Onus , February 14, 2013 3:14 PM
    rush21hit...I don't think my focus is that good even with Magnifier Tool...Even with my recent resolution, I experienced some hard time to adjust myself when gaming is involved. The HUGE screen about 60 inch from my eyes still hurts my respond. I'm too focused on what happen on the middle of the screen and never had a chance to look at details on corners, when I do, it's already too late...

    This certainly applies to my 53-yr old eyes. I have two 1920x1080 monitors now, and I use the smaller one (21.5") on my primary PC because I am a little less likely to miss things than on the 23" one. Also, it isn't just the cost of the monitor; for games you're looking at $400-$600 price of graphics card(s) to go with it, plus a beefier PSU... I just can't justify it. I'm not knocking those who can, but I can't.
    I am happy with 1920x1080; I suspect my next monitor upgrade (unlikely to be soon) will be to get a 120Hz monitor for 3D, but not to get more real estate.
  • -1 Hide
    xPandaPanda , February 14, 2013 3:53 PM
    More correctly, it's WQHD (2560 x 1440)
    QHD is more generally 3840 x 2160, but in regards to being 4x 720p, it's acceptable. Just not too... correct.

    For example, 720p shouldn't be HD if 1080p is HD. Like... 720 should have been 720miniHD but for marketing use, it's HD because HD is always good. So QHD is more reasonably 4x 1080p.
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