Skip to main content

2TB for $250: Intel’s 660p NVMe SSD Drops to Cheap SATA Pricing (Updated)

UPDATE:Newegg has run out of stock for this item, so the sale has come to an end. However, you can still get the 512GB model for $74.

Intel’s 660p M.2 SSD was impressively affordable when it debuted earlier this year, selling for about $0.20-per-GB, and earning our Editor’s Choice award thanks to its speedy performance and low price. The only caveat is, because this is a quad-level-cell drive (QLC, the first of its kind), rated endurance isn’t great, particularly on lower-capacity models. So you don’t want to use this drive in a server or some other situation where it’s getting hammered with writes all day and night.

Newegg is now selling the top-capacity 2TB 660p M.2 drive (with an endurance rating of 400TBW) for $249.99. That works out to $0.125-per-GB, which is a low price even for a budget SATA SSD. The rated sequential reads and writes for the 2TB 660p drive are 1800MBps, which is more than three times the theoretical top speed for a SATA drive. So if you can afford to drop $250 on a boot drive, this is a real steal.

Our testing shows that the 660p is also power efficient, making it a good pick for a laptop drive as well. Just remember that you’ll need an M.2 slot that expressly supports NVMe (some only support SATA) to use this drive. And if you’re looking for something less spacious and more affordable, Newegg is also selling a 512GB model of the 660p for $74.99. Just know that that model has lesser speed and endurance ratings. Both drives ship with 5-year warranties.

Image
Intel SSD 660p (2TB)
Image
Intel SSD 660p (512GB)

More Holiday Deals Coverage

Matt Safford
Matt began piling up computer experience as a child with his Mattel Aquarius. He built his first PC in the late 1990s and ventured into mild PC modding in the early 2000s. He’s spent the last decade covering emerging technology for Smithsonian, Popular Science, and Consumer Reports, while testing components and PCs for Computer Shopper and Digital Trends. When not writing about tech, he’s often walking—through the streets of New York, over the sheep-dotted hills of Scotland, or just at his treadmill desk at home in front of the 50-inch 4K HDR TV that serves as his PC monitor.