Cyonic AU-650x PSU Review

A Look Inside And Component Analysis

Parts Description

Before proceeding with this page, we strongly encourage you to a look at our PSUs 101 article, which provides valuable information about PSUs and their operation, allowing you to better understand the components we're about to discuss. Our main tools for disassembling PSUs are a Thermaltronics soldering and rework station, and a Hakko 808 desoldering gun.

Primary Side
Transient Filter6x Y caps, 2x X caps, 2x CM chokes, 1x MOV
Inrush ProtectionNTC Thermistor & Relay
Bridge Rectifier(s)1x GBU10V08 (800V, 10A @ 85 °C)
APFC MOSFETs2x Infineon IPD65R190C7 (700V, 8A @ 100 °C, 190 mohm)
APFC Boost Diode1x Infineon IDH08SG60C (600V, 8A @ 130 °C)
Hold-up Cap(s)1x Chemi-Con (420V, 560uF, 2000h @ 105 °C, KMR)
Main Switchers2x Infineon IPD50R280CE (550V, 8.2A @ 100 °C, 0.28 mohm)
APFC ControllerInfineon ICE3PCS01
Switching ControllerOn Semiconductor NCP1910
TopologyPrimary side: Half-Bridge & LLC Resonant Converter
Secondary side: Synchronous Rectification & DC-DC converters
Secondary Side
+12V MOSFETs / SBRs4x NXP PSMN2R6-40YS MOSFETs (40V, 100A @ 100 °C, 3.7 mohm)
2x SBR10U45S SBRs (45V, 10A @ 110 °C, 0.54V forward voltage drop @ 125 °C)
+12V Synchronous RectifierMonolithic Power Systems MP6922A
5V & 3.3VDC-DC Converters: 2x FDE15AJ
2x APW7164 PWM Controllers
Filtering CapacitorsElectrolytics: Nippon Chemi-Con (KY 7000h @ 105 °C, KZE 5000h @ 105 °C)
Polymers: Nippon Chemi-Con, EneSol, FPCAP
Supervisor ICHY-510N (OVP, UVP, SCP)
Fan ModelHong Hua HA1225M12F-Z (12V, 0.45A, Fluid Dynamic Bearing, 2050 RPM)
5VSB Circuit
Rectifier1x SBR10U45S
Standby PWM ControllerFairchild FSQ0165

The AU-650x uses a new Seasonic platform that we first encountered in EVGA's 650 GS and 550 GS units. It is classified below the Seasonic G series, offering lower performance (especially when it comes to ripple suppression). Obviously, the company wanted to enter the mid-range market, so it had to cut production costs as much as possible without giving up too much quality or reliability.

On the primary side, the APFC heat sink is small and doesn't host any components, while there isn't a heat sink at all for the secondary side's +12V FETs. Instead, they're installed on the PCB's solder side and are cooled by the power supply's chassis. Seasonic uses a half-bridge topology with an LLC resonant converter for increased efficiency in the primary side, along with a synchronous design in the secondary side and a couple of DC-DC converters for generating the minor rails. In general, this is a modern platform that appears to be very reliable due to its high-quality components and Japanese caps.

The first part of the EMI filter is shielded for greater protection against radiated emissions. It consists of two Y caps and a single X cap. The second part of the same filter on the main PCB consists of four Y caps, a single X cap, two CM chokes and an MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor) that provides protection against spikes coming from the mains network.

An NTC thermistor, along with an electromagnetic relay, provide protection against large inrush currents. The relay allows the thermistor to cool down quickly by isolating it once the start-up phase finishes.

The single bridge rectifier is bolted on a small, dedicated heat sink; its model number is GBU10V08.

The APFC FETs, along with a single boost diode, are installed on the solder side of the PCB. In total, two Infineon IPD65R190C7 FETs and an Infineon IDH08SG60C boost diode are used. The EVGA 650 GS employs stronger FETs with higher RDS(on) values, so we expect the Cyonic AU-650x to achieve slightly higher efficiency. The heat sink on top of the APFC's FETs and boost diode does help dissipate heat. However, the chassis plays a more active role in cooling those components down. The bulk cap is provided by Nippon Chemi-Con (420V, 560uF, 2000h @ 105 °C, KMR); it has enough capacity to provide a long hold-up time.

Two Infineon IPD50R280CE FETs, arranged into a half-bridge topology, are the unit's main switchers. An LLC resonant converter is also used for increased efficiency. It provides almost loss-less operation to the main switchers.

A daughterboard hosts the combo PFC/resonant controller (an NCP1910 IC). The same PCB also hosts the protections IC, an HY-510N. This is a basic supervisor circuit that enables OVP, UVP and SCP.

The +12V rail is regulated by four NXP PSMN2R6-40YS FETs and two SBR10U45S SBRs. The SBRs don't play an active role in regulation, as they would in a semi-synchronous design. In this case, the SBRs replace the FET's embedded diodes, limiting energy losses. Between the +12V FETs, we also found an MP6922A rectifier IC.

The APFC and main switchers, along with the +12V FETs and all SBRs installed on the mainboard's solder side, are cooled down by the chassis. In order to offer increased heat dissipation, a metal plate is installed at the bottom of the enclosure. Heat is transferred to it through thermal pads.

The small VRMs use an APW7164 PWM controller, along with a FDE15AJ FET.

The filtering caps in the secondary side are provided by Chemi-Con. Both polymer and electrolytic caps are used, with the latter rated at 105 °C. These should last a long time, even though KZE capacitors don't belong to Chemi-Con's top lines. Some Taiwanese or Chinese caps may have equal or even better specs on paper. However, you shouldn't always take those specifications seriously, since the quality of their electrolyte is inferior to what the Japanese caps use.

On the front side of the modular board, several polymer caps from Enesol and Chemi-Con provide extra ripple filtering to the outputs.

The standby PWM controller is an FSQ0165R IC and the 5VSB regulator is an SBR10U45S SBR, which is installed on the solder side of the mainboard.

Soldering quality is quite good overall, as usually is the case in Seasonic products.

The cooling fan is provided by Hong Hua and it uses a Fluid Dynamic Bearing (FDB). Its model number is HA1225M12F-Z (12V, 0.45A, 2050 RPM). Many other Seasonic PSUs employ the same exact fan, including the high-end Snow Silent 750W PSU. This fan is noisy at high speeds, but under light and moderate loads its control circuit keeps rotational speed and acoustic output low.

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20 comments
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  • JQB45
    Interesting, but I'll stick with Seasonic's own offerings...
  • PureBlackFire
    this along with the GS 550/650 all need price drops. selling at the same price as the XFX XTR series and other offerings on the superior S12G platform is a bad move. the EVGA G2 units sink this even further being just $10 more.
  • CTurbo
    Geez this market is getting crowded. I'm sure this is a great unit, but what could it possibly offer that Seasonic's other numerous 650w units don't? I understand it from Seasonic's standpoint. The more hands in the cookie jar, the more cookies!
  • turkey3_scratch
    Overall, I personally find the EVGA GS to be a bit overrated, and this unit is not much better. I just can't deal with 3.3V rail load regulation at 4.7%. That's way too high for my liking. Ripple, seeing over 70mv. Again, I don't like that. I just don't think it's that good. The only thing going for this and the GS is the full modularity and the pricing. The Corsair TX V2 is a much better performer than both of these, and that is an old budget oriented unit form years ago. Seasonic needs to step up their game when it comes to these units. I've seen much better, such as the Silverstone Nightjar 520W.

    Then again, I'm a lot more strict when it comes to normal people with this stuff. What is "good" to some of you is probably considered "poor" by me. Or your "Excellent" is my "good". I do recommend the GS series very frequently in many builds. It's an average PSU, and so is this one, but I don't like that 3.3V regulation. If it was lower, I'd be much happier.

    Oh, and great review. Toms has better PSU reviews than any other site.
  • CTurbo
    turkey3_scratch, this unit and the GS series units are in no way "average" in terms of real world usage and reliability. The worst Seasonic psu is still going to be much better than average.
  • turkey3_scratch
    1400024 said:
    turkey3_scratch, this unit and the GS series units are in no way "average" in terms of real world usage and reliability. The worst Seasonic psu is still going to be much better than average.


    When I see units on the market getting even 0% regulation on minor rails, ripple 10mv on both minor rails and under 25mv for the 12V, I consider the GS to be average. "Average" is subjective - it's just how I think of it. :) Reliability is definitely high, quality capacitors, but it's the performance that I would like to see improvements upon.
  • CTurbo
    Yeah but you're basing EVERYTHING on stats and other peoples' reviews. Have you ever even had your hands on one of these? Have you ever used one? Have you ever done a psu tear down? I'm not trying to bust your balls. I'm glad that you have taken such an interest in psus. I'm just saying there's no substitute for hands on experience.
  • turkey3_scratch
    1400024 said:
    Yeah but you're basing EVERYTHING on stats and other peoples' reviews. Have you ever even had your hands on one of these? Have you ever used one? Have you ever done a psu tear down? I'm not trying to bust your balls. I'm glad that you have taken such an interest in psus. I'm just saying there's no substitute for hands on experience.


    Using a PSU is not going to make me like it more or less. From my third person perspective, the PSU is either working or it's not. That's why I like statistics, it tells me what's going on deep inside that I cannot tell from the outside. And no, I have not done a PSU tear down. I'm still a beginner in learning about PSUs. But other people do tear downs, and if they do, I don't need to.

    And also, I'm planning on buying a 550 GS myself. So just goes to show you that I even do like the series, even though I consider it average.
  • blazorthon
    The whole point of this series from Seasonic and the companies who use it is that its cheaper than their high-end line. The results are what I'd call average performance with some instances of issues that are barely in-spec for ATX power supplies. I agree with turkey3_scratch on this.

    These units aren't bad and I'd consider them in some lower budget builds, but not in higher budget builds or when anything more than modest overclocking is intended. They certainly aren't tier 1.
  • turkey3_scratch
    Though the G2 is super close in price to the GS. The current 550W G2 is the exact same price as the 550W GS. As a matter of fact, the GS 550W has probably been my most recommended PSU on this forum. It all depends on how it is priced.
  • CTurbo
    The two XFX 550w bronze units and the EVGA B2 750w Bronze are IMO the most recommended psus on here.
  • turkey3_scratch
    Yeah, true I do recommend the XFX Core Edition 550W a lot. B2 750W used to be my go-to, pcpartpicker doesn't list it anymore, but you can manually go to the page for it and add it to the part list. But frankly, most builds on here only need a 550W PSU like the XFX. And if the B2 is $10 more, I'll recommend the XFX. Ones that do need a higher rated PSU, I usually go to a G2.

    550W GS is probably my second most recommended.
  • CTurbo
    What you talkin about Willis?

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Power Supply: EVGA 750W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $59.99
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-01-29 23:48 EST-0500
  • turkey3_scratch
    But to be fair, that's with a $20 rebate, and a lot of users don't want rebates included in their budget. Some users have a strict amount of money and don't want to spend the extra $20 for the time being.
  • CTurbo
    It was more of a response to you saying that partpicker doesn't list it anymore.
  • JQB45
    So how would we rate this power supply? To me with the ripple issue I'd say its a solid Tier-3 unit, possible Tier-2.
  • CTurbo
    I wouldn't put it lower than tier 2 based on reliability alone. Reliability being the single most important aspect of a psu IMO.

    When I think of tier 3 units, I think of models that are either mediocre in reliability or models that test well when new, but don't age very well.
  • turkey3_scratch
    68185 said:
    So how would we rate this power supply? To me with the ripple issue I'd say its a solid Tier-3 unit, possible Tier-2.


    The ripple wasn't really bad. 60mv is quite common on PSUs. The minor rails were both very good. Thew voltage regulation on the 3.3V rail just could have been improved. It was 0.3% from being out of spec.

    @Cturbo: I mean if you go to pcpartpicker, and click on PSU, and narrow it down to EVGA units, the B2 is not listed. But if you Google "pcpartpicker EVGA B2", you can find the page for it.
  • CTurbo
    Quote:
    @Cturbo: I mean if you go to pcpartpicker, and click on PSU, and narrow it down to EVGA units, the B2 is not listed. But if you Google "pcpartpicker EVGA B2", you can find the page for it.



    It's there for me when I do it. It's the only 750w semi-mod Bronze for $59 on the list.
  • turkey3_scratch
    Oh, I found it now. I was ctrl-f and searching for "B2" but I realized it's not listed as B2.