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2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track: Telematics And Infotainment

Mechanical Features And Technology

New to the 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe is an updated version of the company’s Lambda 3800 V6 motor that pumps out 348 horsepower and 295 foot-pounds of torque at 6400 RPM and 5300 RPM with premium fuel, respectively. Hyundai fits the all-aluminum V6 with direct fuel injection technology to net the 42 hp increase from the multi-port fuel injection system used in earlier models. For the uninitiated, direct injection improves efficiency by mixing air and gasoline directly in the cylinder, rather than pre-mixing them in an intake manifold. The result is more power and better fuel economy.

Hyundai mates its new 3.8-liter V6 GDI motor with an also-new eight-speed Shiftronic manumatic transmission, which boasts twice as many gears than most cars with automatic transmissions manufactured prior to the last decade.

The car's steering wheel is equipped with paddle shifters for manually rowing through the gears. Should you get a little too aggressive with your shift points, the car upshifts on its own at redline to prevent damage, and downshifts if it can’t maintain the gear you're in at a certain engine speed. One nice thing about the way Hyundai implemented its paddle shifters is that they're able to facilitate manual engine braking without knocking the transmission out of fully automatic mode.

The powertrain combination delivers an EPA-estimated 18 MPG in the city and 28 MPG on the highway, 1 MPG improvement over the 2011 model. We didn't confirm those fuel economy numbers; this is a sporty car, after all, and it demanded lead-foot driving. We'd rather listen to the sweet sound of exhaust.

Exclusive to the R-Spec and Track trim levels is a Torsen (torque-sensing) limited-slip differential, or LSD. The LSD enables the rear differential to send more power to the wheel with the most amount of traction for maximum grip around corners.

The Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track is a sports coupe. As such, Hyundai equips it with Brembo four-piston calipers, combined with 13.4-inch rotors up front and 13-inch rotors in the rear.

  • shahrooz
    waiting for the Crysis guy
    Reply
  • Nintendo Maniac 64
    I thought at first the car in the thumbnail was a Tesla Model S... I mean, it IS essentially a computer (runs Linux on dual Tegra 3s and all).

    Now THAT'S something Tom's should review. :P
    Reply
  • assasin32
    My stereo which is primitive by comparison has a far faster "boot up" time than any of these "infotainment" systems these cars have. It starts when I turn on the car there is mabey a 1sec delay and another 1sec if I decide to put in a cd as it has to start spinning it.

    And if you want the fancy features I still think an AUX connection from the stereo to the phone is the best bet. If its a smartphone you have the internet/mp3/pandora/gps and if you want an OBD2 scanner like Torque in case your car breaks down. And people usually upgrade these things once every few years and there will be no compatability issues using an AUX connection.
    Reply
  • stellato12
    .....but can it play Crysis?
    Reply
  • cknobman
    Waiting for an STI version of the Subaru BRX or TRD version of the Scion FR-S. From most reviews I have read the Hyundai handles like a pig on the track and those Brembo brakes have issues after a few laps.
    Reply
  • tuanies
    9537403 said:
    I thought at first the car in the thumbnail was a Tesla Model S... I mean, it IS essentially a computer (runs Linux on dual Tegra 3s and all).

    Now THAT'S something Tom's should review. :P

    We're trying to get one in for a week but considering how well they're selling it'll be a while.


    9537406 said:
    My stereo which is primitive by comparison has a far faster "boot up" time than any of these "infotainment" systems these cars have. It starts when I turn on the car there is mabey a 1sec delay and another 1sec if I decide to put in a cd as it has to start spinning it.

    And if you want the fancy features I still think an AUX connection from the stereo to the phone is the best bet. If its a smartphone you have the internet/mp3/pandora/gps and if you want an OBD2 scanner like Torque in case your car breaks down. And people usually upgrade these things once every few years and there will be no compatability issues using an AUX connection.

    They still have aux inputs. However, I have an article idea that'll appeal to smartphone users such as yourself - just waiting for the Windows Phone 8 launch to commence ;) I'm open to any ideas you want to see covered though.

    9537418 said:
    .....but can it play Crysis?

    No but if you want to port Angry Birds or Duke Nukem 3D to QNX and find a way to get them loaded onto the infotainment system, go for it :p

    9537421 said:
    Waiting for an STI version of the Subaru BRX or TRD version of the Scion FR-S. From most reviews I have read the Hyundai handles like a pig on the track and those Brembo brakes have issues after a few laps.

    You and i both. The Hyundai is a fun daily, but that extra weight doesn't help it around a track.

    Reply
  • What is this on Tom's again....?
    Reply
  • travish82
    348 horsepower and 295 foot-pounds of torque... WTF? I feel like I've been living under a rock. I guess this is what happens when you only buy used cars with cash. Suddenly Hyundias are freaking fast.
    Reply
  • xsamitt
    I come here for Commuters not cars.This site has really lost it.
    Reply
  • xsamitt
    Make that computers lol.
    Reply