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WikiLeaks Publishes All Documents And Emails From Sony Leak

Two months after the data leak at Sony Pictures Entertainment, co-chairwoman Amy Pascal stepped down from her leadership position, with Michael Lynton, the chief executive at Sony Pictures, taking over her duties and assuming control of the company. Even with its best efforts, Sony wasn't able to contain the leak, and portions of it spilled out to the public. Today, however, you can view the contents of the entire leak via WikiLeaks.

The amount of data is immense. It consists of 30,287 documents, 173,132 emails and 2,200 email addresses. It would take one person days to sift through all the data, but the website highlighted a few documents showing Sony executives involved in political and militaristic matters, as well as research on rival film productions. One document discussed raising $50,000 for current New York governor Andrew Cuomo. Several Sony execs were asked to donate to the campaign, including Pascal.

WikiLeaks also believes that Lynton is on the board of trustees of RAND Corporation, which is "an organization specializing in research and development for the United States military and intelligence sector," and the site said the archives provide evidence of constant contact between RAND Corporation and Sony.

The two groups also worked together during production of The Interview, the movie believed to be the catalyst for the entire leak, and for which the RAND Corporation provided an analyst specializing in North Korea. The same group also told Sony to reach out to the NSA and the State Department regarding North Korea's complaints about the movie.

In terms of the entertainment industry, the press release highlighted a report showing Sony employees discussing the detailed budget of a rival project: Oliver Stone's upcoming film Snowden. The report highlighted the amount paid for the movie rights to Snowden based on Luke Harding's The Snowden Files and Anatoly Kucherena's Time of the Octopus. Harding, a reporter for The Guardian, was paid $700,000, while Kucherena, Edward Snowden's lawyer, was paid $1 million.

There is much more information contained within the thousands of files and emails published by WikiLeaks. As was the case when the leak was first reported, most, if not all, of the content is sensitive and wasn't meant to be seen by the public, putting many of Sony's employees and executives at risk. It's impossible to reverse the effects, so Sony has no choice but to stay on the defensive and weather the storm until it passes.

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  • TNT27
    Fun. In the wrong hands this information can hurt the public too.
    Reply
  • ikefu
    The same people who cry about government spying post this up on their site which is basically spying on not only a corporation but individual employees with rights who have done nothing wrong. I don't condone either type of spying and this wreaks of hypocrisy.
    Reply
  • anathema_forever
    i guess its a matter of degree of and scale, this is a drop in the bucket compared to what corporations and government violate. It seems a little bit like trivial pursuit to complain about this compared to that.
    Reply
  • alidan
    The same people who cry about government spying post this up on their site which is basically spying on not only a corporation but individual employees with rights who have done nothing wrong. I don't condone either type of spying and this wreaks of hypocrisy.
    sorry but no, when you start to bribe politicians you deserve the leak... so im hoping for all the dirty laundry from everyone to get aired at some point.
    Reply
  • sup189
    The same people who cry about government spying post this up on their site which is basically spying on not only a corporation but individual employees with rights who have done nothing wrong. I don't condone either type of spying and this wreaks of hypocrisy.

    STFU! Are you going to be using that information against those innocent people? If not then who cares. You should be mad at the people who will use that information for against them. Id be more concerned about our business practices here then some random person which is what the hackers did.
    Reply
  • Solandri
    15694539 said:
    i guess its a matter of degree of and scale, this is a drop in the bucket compared to what corporations and government violate. It seems a little bit like trivial pursuit to complain about this compared to that.
    It's this artificial distinction between "individuals" and "corporations/government" which is really corrosive to society. At some point you realize that corporations, governments, and other organizations are just a bunch of individuals working together. The moment you decide the individuals that work at an organization are fair targets because you dislike the organization, you've lost your respect for humanity. Because everyone (except for hermits living out in the woods) belongs to some organization(s). Even WikiLeaks itself is an organization - some would condemn all the individuals who work for WikiLeaks and not treat them with basic human decency simply because they dislike the organization.

    A favorite tactic of war propaganda is to de-humanize the enemy, so you can justify in you rmind all sorts of things you'd normally never subject another human being to. Thinking of the people working at these corporations, government, and other organizations as nothing more than a cog in their organization is just a way to de-humanize them, so you can rationalize doing things to them that you would never condone doing to a fellow human being.

    If it's wrong to publish the private emails of an individual unrelated to criminal activity, then it's wrong to publish the private emails of an individual working at Sony unrelated to criminal activity.
    Reply
  • firefoxx04
    Cool Toms. Kick them while they are down and then cry about the NSA next week. Pricks.
    Reply
  • StarBound
    The highlights listed on toms doesn't exactly sound uncommon. Knowing the way forward is knowing your competition as long as no sabotage is committed.

    Forcing someone to do something as it looks from the article is a violation of rights unless it was stated in their contract that the company can ask from its execs to support a certain decision.

    While I would love to know whats going on in corporate structures this has me worried that I might have to redo my PSN password and at worst case log on only to find my account banned and all my purchases voided.
    Reply
  • boju
    Julian Assange will be our next Australian Prime Minister
    Reply
  • Goodspike
    I guess now there's no question about whether this is a criminal organization. I can't believe there are actually people who compare Wikileaks to Snowden.
    Reply