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Xbox One Teardown as Console Arrives in New Zealand

We've already seen the inside of the PS4 and now iFixit is rounding out the console war with a full teardown of Microsoft's brand new Xbox One. Though the console hasn't launched yet, the Xbox One is already on sale in New Zealand due to time differences. The ever committed iFixit crew flew to New Zealand to get their hands on one of the first consoles sold and performed a teardown ahead of the console's release.

The good news is that it’s reasonably easy to repair your Xbox One console. The device scored an impressive 8/10 on iFixit's repairability scale. The iFixit crew reports that the fan and heat sink is easy to replace and, while the console doesn’t have the same user-replaceable hard drive as the PS4, the hard drive is a standard 2.5-inch 500 GB 5400 RPM HDD. Replacing it will void your warranty, but it’s doable.

Other finds include SK Hynix SDRAM, an ON Semiconductor integrated power control IC, a Realtek Ethernet controller, a Marvell Avastar WiFi, NFC and Bluetooth chip, and a Texas Instruments high current load switch.

The Xbox One packs an octoa-core x86 processor, 8 GB of RAM, 500 GB of storage and a Blu-ray/DVD drive. It also comes with Microsoft's brand new Kinect 2 sensor as well as a redesigned Xbox controller. Check out what we thought of the Xbox One in our review here.

Head on over to iFixit for the full teardown and the whole gallery of gory photos!

Follow Jane McEntegart @JaneMcEntegart. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • jimmysmitty
    Honestly, I would like to see someone throw say a 512GB SSD or one of Seagates hybrid drives and do some tests. I think that would make the games load even faster.
    Reply
  • bombebomb
    Considering how slow HDD's are I have no doubt it would load REALLY fast.
    Reply
  • sbudbud
    I believe ign or gamespot did a HDD test with the stock hard drive, hybrid and ssd for thge PS$ so I can imagine they'll be doing one for the XBone as well.
    Reply
  • Peacelol
    Doubtful it'll be substantial because they will be bottlenecked. You're better off spending money on a much higher amount of storage space.
    Reply
  • clonazepam
    At any rate, it should only effect load times, and I believe in one instance they talked about a 20 second load time being reduced to about 10 seconds. The less expensive thing to do is, during a load time, take a drink from your favorite beverage, peer out the window, flick the ash from your cigarette, check for new txt msgs/emails on your smartphone, etc, and you'll never even notice the load time.
    Reply
  • carnage9270
    @Peacelol and banmaster. You are absolutely insane if you don't think a sataII SSD will out perform a 5400 HDD. By leaps and bounds man, leaps and bounds.
    Reply
  • jryder
    Yeah. What's up with using 5400 RPM hard drives in 2013? They should use at least 7200 RPM, FFS!
    Reply
  • bradsctt
    New Zealand FTW :)
    Reply
  • vaughn2k
    Aside from the HDD thingy, the assembly looks pretty nice and clean though... love how they designed it. ;)
    Reply
  • sbudbud
    I love how the Blu Ray drive is sata, can you say easy FW flashing inc?
    Reply