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Xotic PC Joins VR-Ready System Party

Virtual reality (VR) is officially here (and here), and a plethora of OEMs and system builders have launched VR-Ready campaigns featuring their branded gaming desktops or laptops that can meet or exceed the steep graphics horsepower requirements for the mainstream VR headsets. Xotic PC just joined the party with five desktop configurations and seven high-performance laptops that meet or exceed the minimum requirements for VR gaming.

Desktops

Xotic PC has five models available, with the only differences in the base models being the chassis and the price. Otherwise, the Executioner Z170 VR, Exodus Mini Z170 VR, Exodus Z170 VR, Recon Z170 VR and Scourge Z170 VR all feature the same baseline components:

ProcessorIntel Core i5-6500
MotherboardAsus Z170 Pro Gaming ATX Motherboard
Memory8 GB (2 x 4 GB) Kingston HyperX DDR4-2666
Graphics CardEVGA GeForce GTX 970 SSC 4 GB GDDR5
Storage1 TB 7200 RPM HDD
Power SupplyEVGA Supernova 750W G2

Each model offers a different look and upgrade path, depending on how large or small of a chassis you choose. All of the VR-Ready desktop systems are fully customizable with liquid cooling (closed loop or up to custom hardline tubing), upgraded components (SLI, increased memory size and speed, additional or faster storage), and additional aesthetic modifications (LED fans, lighting).

The desktop models’ baseline configurations are adequate for VR gaming and start at $1,429 for the Exodus Mini Z170 VR. The most expensive base configuration is its bigger brother, the Exodus Z170 VR, which starts at $1,729.

Laptops

Xotic PC offers specially tuned and customized versions of popular mainstream laptops, including systems from MSI and Sager (which often use Clevo shells). The VR-Ready laptops all sport an Nvidia GTX 980 (or two in SLI, as in the case of the MSI GT80S Titan SLI-072) 8 GB graphics module, Intel Core i7 processors (the Sager branded models feature desktop CPUs), up to 64 GB of memory, and PCIe NVMe storage options.

The displays on all of the VR-Ready laptops are mostly 17.3-inch FHD (1920 x 1080) IPS panels, with the exception of the 18.4-inch FHD MSI GT80S Titan and the 17.3-inch UHD (3840 x 2160) IPS Matte screen of the MSI GT72S Dominator Pro 4K-059.

Of course, these premium systems will set you back a few premium dollars, with the entry level for the laptops ringing up at $2,169 for the Sager NP9870 and capping out with the MSI GT80S Titan at $4,599.

You can check out all of the VR Ready gaming systems from Xotic PC at its website.

Derek Forrest is an Associate Contributing Writer for Tom’s Hardware and Tom’s IT Pro. Follow Derek Forrest on Twitter. Follow us on Facebook, Google+, RSS, Twitter and YouTube.

Derek Forrest
Derek Forrest is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware US. He writes hardware news and reviews gaming desktops and laptops.
  • Matt_550
    $1,429 for a Locked i5 and a GTX 970?!?!?!?!?!?!!? LOL, so over priced. Could easily throw together a 980Ti + 6600K with cooler for that price.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    $1,429 for a Locked i5 and a GTX 970?!?!?!?!?!?!!? LOL, so over priced. Could easily throw together a 980Ti + 6600K with cooler for that price.

    People will pay quite an asburd premium to have someone else do the work for them.
    Reply
  • Nuckles_56
    Especially, when it involves custom water cooling loops, which are a pain to get right
    Reply
  • Abusing_binkie
    Where's the fun in that?!?
    Reply
  • Matt_550
    Custom cooling adds $400 to the price for the lowest level of cooling which is CPU only. That's insane. Granted labor adds a bit but seriously the parts aren't that bad you might hit $300 or so doing CPU only going with top end parts. So it's at least a $100 premium and you have no idea the components they will use to build said loop. I try to stay away from the mystery box.
    Reply
  • Skip27
    Custom cooling adds $400 to the price for the lowest level of cooling which is CPU only. That's insane. Granted labor adds a bit but seriously the parts aren't that bad you might hit $300 or so doing CPU only going with top end parts. So it's at least a $100 premium and you have no idea the components they will use to build said loop. I try to stay away from the mystery box.

    I would not be so sure about that. I spent over $100 on my Bitspower fittings along on my last custom loop. Throw in another $60 for the block, $80 for the radiator, $50 for the res, $80 for the pump and $30 for plastic tubing. Oh yeah, and add another $18 to $35 for coolant. If you want hard tubing, that costs more, with WAY more labor. PrimoChill tubing is easy to work with, but the hard tubing is quite difficult, not to mention the fittings cost more. Oh yeah, and you need fans. Good sleeved fans will be at least $20 each, if not more (I like Scythe Gentle Typhoons).

    The only way you could do $300 for a new CPU loop is if you bought one of those EK kits. They have great water blocks, but the fittings and fans leave much to be desired.
    Reply
  • Matt_550
    Custom cooling adds $400 to the price for the lowest level of cooling which is CPU only. That's insane. Granted labor adds a bit but seriously the parts aren't that bad you might hit $300 or so doing CPU only going with top end parts. So it's at least a $100 premium and you have no idea the components they will use to build said loop. I try to stay away from the mystery box.

    I would not be so sure about that. I spent over $100 on my Bitspower fittings along on my last custom loop. Throw in another $60 for the block, $80 for the radiator, $50 for the res, $80 for the pump and $30 for plastic tubing. Oh yeah, and add another $18 to $35 for coolant. If you want hard tubing, that costs more, with WAY more labor. PrimoChill tubing is easy to work with, but the hard tubing is quite difficult, not to mention the fittings cost more. Oh yeah, and you need fans. Good sleeved fans will be at least $20 each, if not more (I like Scythe Gentle Typhoons).

    The only way you could do $300 for a new CPU loop is if you bought one of those EK kits. They have great water blocks, but the fittings and fans leave much to be desired.

    Adding hard tubing adds an extra $400 on top of the $400 for a rudimentary liquid cooling kit from them. FYI: they have 2 CPU only cooling options. Meaning that $400 base one is most likely cheap stuff. That $100 on fittings was most likely to cool more than just the CPU.
    Reply