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Zotac Creates the First Quad-Slot RTX 3090 Ti Graphics Card

Zotac RTX 3090 Ti PGF OC
(Image credit: Zotac)

Zotac has created the world's largest RTX 3090 Ti model to date for the Chinese market, the RTX 3090 Ti PGF OC. Measuring in at a solid four PCIe slots in thickness, it is only rivaled by the RTX 3070 Noctua Edition for girth, with the rest of Nvidia's AIB partner RTX 30-series products (including other 3090 Tis) peaking at around 3.75 slots.

On the surface, the PGF OC appears to be a beefier and more aesthetically pleasing version of the RTX 3090 Ti AMP Extreme Holo we get in the States. It packs a triple-fan cooler with two large fans on the sides, accompanied by a single smaller fan in the middle. The front shroud features a futuristic-looking silver-on-grey finish, accented by purple LED lighting.

Despite the card's massive size, it appears to have one of the shortest PCBs of any RTX 3090 Ti, rivaled by Nvidia's Founders Edition SKU. It's 'only' 30.9 cm long, compared to 31.3 cm for the Founders Edition (about 12.2 inches in either case). That's still a large card, to be sure, but not quite as large as some other models we've seen online that can reach 13 inches or more.

To the rear right of the card, you can see a massive cut out in the backplate and PCB to let air pass right through the card from the rear fan. This circular-shaped cut-out alone takes up nearly half the card's size, accompanied by a rear purple LED logo. The backplate itself is quite aggressive-looking with more angular cut-outs to the left to cool the rear components on the PCB itself.

Of course, we can't forget how the card looks from the side, and with a thickness of four slots, it's a chunky card to look at. From the bottom of the card, you can clearly make out the large aluminum heatsink required to cool the 3090 Ti's 450W TDP. The shroud overhangs the top of the card with an aggressive-looking Zotac logo, accompanied by purple LED accents on the left and right of the logo.

According to the spec sheet, the default power limit is "only" 450W, the same as the reference design. However, users can probably push that to 500W or higher considering the card's enormous cooler.

One thing we do need to point out — and dock points for — is the dual-slot IO bracket. Nvidia at least gets that part right with its Founders Edition, which takes up three slots and includes a triple-slot IO bracket to help support the weight of the card. There's no way to use the two slots next to this huge GPU, so we think Zotac (and other AIC partners) should reinforce the support of the card by moving to 3-slot or 4-slot brackets, as appropriate.

Pricing is currently unknown for this SKU, as it hasn't reached any market retailers that we know of. We expect this card to be very expensive, given its exceptional form factor and halo design aesthetics. Unfortunately for US and European customers, we believe this card will be exclusive to Asian countries such as China, with Zotac only showing the PGF OC on its Chinese website.

Aaron Klotz
Aaron Klotz

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • Madkog
    WOW, I hope this is not a sign for the 4000 series. ITX owners are going to have hard time with a card this big.

    Four slots and 450+ watts seems a little excessive, especially when the majority of industries are trying to reduce their carbon emissions footprint.
    Reply
  • ezst036
    How long until we get hepta-slot GPUs?

    At least give us x24 and x32 length PCI-E if these cards are going to keep getting bigger!
    Reply
  • MaskedMaskot
    Gigantic piece, why for though?
    Reply
  • VforV
    Horrible!

    If this is the trend for everything in GPUs to get higher and bigger, I'll probably stop upgrading my PC very soon and forever. For sure if this affects middle tiers too.

    Higher prices, higher power consumption, higher heat, gigantic GPUs... where will it stop? It's getting ridiculous.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    Madkog said:
    WOW, I hope this is not a sign for the 4000 series. ITX owners are going to have hard time with a card this big.

    Four slots and 450+ watts seems a little excessive, especially when the majority of industries are trying to reduce their carbon emissions footprint.
    ITX users will generally not be able to use a 4 slots card with most existing small casing. Not only that, the 450 to 500W of heat dumped into the case is not tenable. For me, it is the heat output that is going to be the main issue. As it stands now, the 340W that my GPU uses is not just heating up the inside of the PC case rapidly, but also the room slowly where the PC is situated. I’ve recorded room temp increase by about 1 degree celcius after about 30 mins of gaming. While that don’t sound a lot, but the difference in temp is noticeable. Casing wise, you can easily change to a bigger one.
    Reply
  • bolweval
    Need to factor in the cost new case when purchasing this card just to install it.
    Reply
  • King_V
    Well, say what you will about the massive girth required for the 3090Ti with air cooling, I will say that the design seems to be well thought out.

    EXCEPT that I'm always puzzled when they use vertical fins instead of horizontal . . I would think the latter would help partially evacuate the heat from the case.
    Reply
  • WrongRookie
    Why is everyone worked up on this? It's Zotac...they aren't the most focused compared to the ones that are global. If this was done by Asus or Gigabyte, then I'd be concerned.

    But like I said before...no one will buy this one except for large content creators like Linus.

    Madkog said:
    WOW, I hope this is not a sign for the 4000 series. ITX owners are going to have hard time with a card this big..

    Why would they ever want this if their motherboard was not intended for this?

    I mean...would they ever go for a GTX 1060 board that's too big of a card without it's itx counter type?
    Reply