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The Best Selling SteamVR Games of 2018

Sprint Vector

Sprint Vector is the second active VR game from Survios, and it’s another hot VR title that is sure to make you break a sweat. Sprint Vector is a wild VR foot race that will challenge your athletic ability. You must run, jump, climb, fly and fling yourself across a variety of intergalactic race courses to come out as the champion against 11 other competitors.

Sprint Vector features a unique locomotion system that enables fast-paced movement through large virtual environments. Survios created a locomotion technique called Fluid Locomotion, which combines the Arm Swinger locomotion with the ability to grab environmental objects, such as railings, to fling yourself into the air. Then, you can transition to a Superman-like pose, which enables you to glide and steer.

Sprint Vector didn’t sell as well as Raw Data, but we’re sure Survios is happy to claim two of the top 24 games on the list.

  • HMD Support: HTC Vive
  • Input: Motion controllers
  • Publisher: Survios
  • Developer: Survios
  • Store Page: Steam
  • Sales Rating: Gold

The Talos Principle

The Talos Principle is Croteam’s most recent VR conversion, but it’s selling better than most of the developer’s VR portfolio. The Serious Sam games are fun in VR, but The Talos Principle’s first-person puzzles feel like they were meant for VR.

The positive reviews of the Talos Principle VR are paying dividends for Croteam. The developer built the game years ago, so any number of sales would likely please the team. And we bet the developer is more than a little bit pleased about securing a top-selling position.

  • HMD Support: HTC Vive
  • Input: Motion controllers
  • Publisher: Devolver Digital
  • Developer: Croteam VR
  • Store Page: Steam
  • Sales Rating: Gold

Tilt Brush

Tilt Brush is a VR experience that everyone should try at least once. There’s nothing quite like painting in a 3D environment, and it’s almost impossible to convey the magic of walking around something you’ve drawn in the air in front of you.

Tilt Brush was one of the first VR experiences available for the HTC Vive. In fact, Google released the art app the day before HTC launched the Vive headset in 2016. Not that it mattered, because everyone who purchased a new Vive at the time received a complimentary copy of Tilt Brush.

Google’s strategy to give Tilt Brush away appears to have paid off because the title still flies off the digital shelves of Valve’s Steam service. Google sold enough copies of Tilt Brush in the first half of 2018 to secure a spot in the Gold tier of the top seller's list.

  • HMD Support: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift
  • Input: Motion controllers
  • Publisher: Google
  • Developer: Google
  • Store Page: Steam
  • Sales Rating: Gold

Virtual Desktop

Virtual Desktop isn’t a game per se, but it’s a VR experience that many people are after. The app enables you to access your Windows PC and anything you have installed on it from within your VR headset.

Virtual Desktop enables you to do your everyday computing tasks, such as browse the web, edit documents, watch a movie on Netflix, or kill some time on YouTube on a giant virtualized screen inside your VR headset. When Virtual Desktop first launched in March 2016, it was the first to offer such a feature set. However, we’re surprised to see Virtual Desktop hit the best seller’s list in 2018 because there isn’t much need for it anymore. Every VR platform, including Steam VR, Oculus Home and Windows Mixed Reality, offers its own way to access standard applications and documents in VR, which makes Virtual Desktop somewhat redundant.

Nevertheless, Virtual Desktop was one of the top 24 most sold VR titles on Steam VR in the first half of 2018.

  • HMD Support: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, Windows MR
  • Input: Motion controllers, keyboard/mouse
  • Publisher: Guy Godin
  • Developer: Guy Godin
  • Store Page: Steam
  • Sales Rating: Gold

Silver & Bronze Titles

We’ve limited our list of Valve’s top-selling Steam VR titles to the Platinum and Gold tiers, but Valve’s full list is much longer than ours. The Silver tier includes 15 other popular titles, such as Doom VFR, L.A. Noire VR, Star Trek: Bridge Crew and The Mage's Tale. And the Bronze tier includes 54 games that are worth consideration, with hot titles such as Sports Bar VR, Eleven Table Tennis VR, The Brookhaven Experiment and Sparc.

  • Reilly
    How could you forget about DCS in VR?
    Reply
  • jpe1701
    What happened to the teardowns we used to get on weekends? Those were very interesting. it seems like the weekend pieces are fluff pieces like over on Toms Guide. Sorry to complain, just I'm here everyday and I want to see Toms Hardware do well.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    21142154 said:
    What happened to the teardowns we used to get on weekends? Those were very interesting. it seems like the weekend pieces are fluff pieces like over on Toms Guide. Sorry to complain, just I'm here everyday and I want to see Toms Hardware do well.
    I don't know if this is the best place, but try commenting here:

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/forum-12.html


    BTW, I didn't mind this piece, but I agree that weekend coverage tends to be a bit thin.
    Reply
  • DGurney
    Screw Steam and screw ALL software rental.
    Reply
  • STOMPCATS2
    Why do I have to be on steam to play a single player game by my self? What has the world come to? Ridiculous.
    Reply
  • Jeff Fx
    I'm a little surprised that more than one commenter is still having personal issues regarding Steam. Steam is well-proven, the base DRM stays out of your way, and every game you've ever bought is available to re-download for free. Steam is DRM done right.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    21159885 said:
    I'm a little surprised that more than one commenter is still having personal issues regarding Steam.
    Lol - personal issues!

    21159885 said:
    Steam is well-proven, the base DRM stays out of your way, and every game you've ever bought is available to re-download for free. Steam is DRM done right.
    Yeah, except after the apocalypse, when its DRM will render all that content unplayable on our solar-powered gaming PCs. At least, that's what I assume they're on about.
    Reply
  • SockPuppet
    Amazing how backwards the readership here on Tom's has become. I expect better than this moronic "DRMs are the Devil!" stupidity.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    21172930 said:
    Amazing how backwards the readership here on Tom's has become. I expect better than this moronic "DRMs are the Devil!" stupidity.
    Oh, come off it! I was just having a bit of fun.
    Reply