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Asus PG279Q ROG Swift 27-inch 165Hz Gaming Monitor Review

We have the highly-anticipated ROG Swift PG279Q in the lab today. It’s a 27-inch IPS-type panel with QHD resolution, G-Sync, ULMB and an unprecedented 165Hz max refresh rate.

Packaging, Physical Layout And Accessories

The ROG Swift PG279Q arrives in a black box emblazoned with graphics and logos announcing the monitor's many gaming features. The box lays down so it's very easy to unpack. The panel is fully assembled so all you have to do is unwrap, connect, and you're ready to frag.

HDMI and DisplayPort cables are included along with a sleek external power brick that looks a little like an AppleTV. You also get a printed quick start guide, warranty card and a user's manual on CD.

Product 360

The panel has one of the slimmest bezels we've ever seen at .3 inches around the sides and top and .5 inches at the bottom. Well-heeled gamers will enjoy placing three of them side-by-side with only the thinnest of vertical lines to break up the wrap-around image. The anti-glare layer is light and crystal clear with no signs of grain or anything else to reduce clarity. Reflections are well-controlled but harsh lighting can reduce contrast if you're not careful. It's set very close to the LC layer, which enhances sharpness but causes a bit of visible light bleed. Our sample wasn't too bad but as you'll see in the uniformity tests on page seven, there are a few flaws visible in dark content.

The stand is one of Asus' best with firm movements for tilt, swivel and height. Portrait mode is supported as well. There is no hint of slop or wobble and the entire package is extremely well put together. Styling is distinctive to the Republic of Gamers line with plenty of sharp angles and cutouts, like the one for cable management in the upright.

Most monitor bases are pretty ordinary but Asus has turned this one into a neat feature. When you turn on the Light In Motion option in the OSD, the ring around the upright and the ROG logo glows red. In standby, the light pulses softly.

The panel is a bit thicker than most with a taper from sides to center that features Asus' characteristic angles. You can see in this shot how beefy the stand is. The only thing missing are side USB ports. To access the two downstream connections you'll have to go to the main input panel.

Your opponents will have no doubt you've brought a premium display to the party. The ROG logo is displayed prominently on the upright. There is a 100mm VESA mount available but you'll have to remove four rubber plugs to access the bolts. You can also see the OSD joystick controller in red along with four keys at the lower left.

Many G-Sync monitors have only a single DisplayPort input but Asus has included an HDMI 1.4 jack as well. Here also are the USB up and downstream ports. Just out of the picture is a headphone output. There are built-in speakers serviced by digital audio only, there is no analog input. They sound small and lack bass and mid-range but they'll do in a pinch.

  • TechyInAZ
    That is one sweet monitor! I can't imagine how good the OLED versions will be. : )

    It's interesting to note that this monitor is actually more demanding than a 4k 60hz monitor. Even though this is only a 2k monitor, it actually has nearly 3x the Hz compared to it's 4k counterparts, making it not supprising that you need at least dual GTX 980tis/Titan Xes to run everything at good settings.
    Reply
  • Epsilon_0EVP
    This isn't the first 165Hz+ monitor. Plenty of CRT's could achieve around 200Hz at low resolutions, and that was over 10 years ago.
    Reply
  • Uri___Pisarev
    I don't know, i went from a 32 inch TV to a 34 inch ultra wide Dell. I feel like i can still use a bigger monitor, anything sub 30 is just too small.
    Reply
  • ubercake
    What I like about these G-sync monitors is you don't have to use an SLI setup to push maximum framerates to minimize perceivable tearing. Ever since the GTX 980 and the Asus PG278Q, all I've needed for great smooth video performance is a G-sync monitor and a single video card. I don't need 165Hz/165fps. I just need smooth gaming through the gamut of my GTX 980's performance whether the framerates are in the 30s or 100s, it's still smooth; no tearing. This G-sync is great tech.

    Now add the PG279Q's fast IPS performance and better contrast to the mix and it seems like an intriguing proposition...
    Reply
  • Robert Dunlop
    I bought the Acer XB27HU with 165hz and what l wasn't prepared for was how fun these types of monitors make playing games again.

    The reviewer is spot on.
    Reply
  • Uri___Pisarev
    That is one sweet monitor! I can't imagine how good the OLED versions will be. : )

    It's interesting to note that this monitor is actually more demanding than a 4k 60hz monitor. Even though this is only a 2k monitor, it actually has nearly 3x the Hz compared to it's 4k counterparts, making it not supprising that you need at least dual GTX 980tis/Titan Xes to run everything at good settings.

    So you need to spend over 2K to really enjoy the product? That's insane to be honest. If you are a regular person out there and all you are willing to spend is $200 on the card (most common option that people chose) that means you will be able to buy that card and fully maxout this monitor oh in about 7 years or so, that's how long it will take for a GTX960 equivalent to be as powerful as 2 980ti's.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    17546502 said:
    That is one sweet monitor! I can't imagine how good the OLED versions will be. : )

    It's interesting to note that this monitor is actually more demanding than a 4k 60hz monitor. Even though this is only a 2k monitor, it actually has nearly 3x the Hz compared to it's 4k counterparts, making it not supprising that you need at least dual GTX 980tis/Titan Xes to run everything at good settings.

    So you need to spend over 2K to really enjoy the product? That's insane to be honest. If you are a regular person out there and all you are willing to spend is $200 on the card (most common option that people chose) that means you will be able to buy that card and fully maxout this monitor oh in about 7 years or so, that's how long it will take for a GTX960 equivalent to be as powerful as 2 980ti's.

    G sync will help with that.

    Plus, like the reviewer said, this monitor is has future proofing in mind. It's designed for future cards that can handle this kind of product.
    Reply
  • toddybody
    I sold my G-Sync 4K panel for a DELL 2716DG (27"@1440p G-Sync 144hz)...90fps has become the new 60fps for me. Can't tell folks how huge it is to go past 60hz.
    Reply
  • agentsi1511
    That is one sweet monitor! I can't imagine how good the OLED versions will be. : )

    It's interesting to note that this monitor is actually more demanding than a 4k 60hz monitor. Even though this is only a 2k monitor, it actually has nearly 3x the Hz compared to it's 4k counterparts, making it not supprising that you need at least dual GTX 980tis/Titan Xes to run everything at good settings.


    This is totally wrong, don't mislead people researching things. I have the Acer XB270HU and run everything at max settings on single GTX 970. IT is not more demanding than a 4k monitor in anyway. As someone with Techy in their name I would imagine you had a clue about this.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    17546521 said:
    That is one sweet monitor! I can't imagine how good the OLED versions will be. : )

    It's interesting to note that this monitor is actually more demanding than a 4k 60hz monitor. Even though this is only a 2k monitor, it actually has nearly 3x the Hz compared to it's 4k counterparts, making it not supprising that you need at least dual GTX 980tis/Titan Xes to run everything at good settings.


    This is totally wrong, don't mislead people researching things. I have the Acer XB270HU and run everything at max settings on single GTX 970. IT is not more demanding than a 4k monitor in anyway. As someone with Techy in their name I would imagine you had a clue about this.

    What games do you play?
    Reply