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Razer Raptor 27 165 Hz Gaming Monitor Review: Saturated With Quality And Performance

A premium display with unique stying and features

Razer Raptor 27 165 Hz
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Razer)

The Raptor 27 has very accurate color and gamma but runs its default color temps a little on the warm side. It can be enjoyed without calibration, but with a few tweaks, it produces reference-level results.

Grayscale & Gamma Tracking

Our grayscale and gamma tests use Calman calibration software from Portrait Displays. We describe our grayscale and gamma tests in detail here.

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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)

You can see the warm tones in the Raptor 27’s Default picture mode, with errors visible in the brighter parts of the image. Gamma tracks to near perfection at the 2.2 reference line.

In the Custom picture mode, precise RGB sliders produce a professional-grade result. This is about as good as it gets for any display of any type. Gamma is now exactly on target as well.

If you choose the alternate Rec.709 gamut mode, color temperature is locked into the Warm setting, which is similar to what we saw in the Default mode. It also ups the gamma to 2.4, which is part of the 709 spec. This makes the picture a bit darker, but raises perceived contrast. It’s a good look for SDR content, especially video. It’s also what we would choose for movies.

Or you could go for one of the THX modes. You get Dark and Bright options, which correspond to 90 or 285 nits peak. Grayscale tracking is also a tad warm, but less so than the 709 preset. Gamma also tracks precisely at 2.4.

Comparisons

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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

If you stick with the Raptor 27’s out-of-box settings, you’ll see a warm white point with very accurate gamma and color. The best choice is to dial in our recommended settings in the Custom picture mode and use the wide gamut for all content. If you want an accurate colorspace for SDR content, the THX or Rec.709 modes work very well. Calibration produces the best grayscale tracking at just 0.41dE average.

Gamma tracking is superior to nearly every monitor we’ve ever tested. This does a lot for perceived contrast and color saturation. A 0.03 range of values means luminance sticks to the 2.2 standard perfectly. The other gamma presets offer the same accuracy. In the Custom mode, the Raptor 27 averaged 2.20. This is excellent performance.

Color Gamut Accuracy

Our color gamut and volume testing use Portrait Displays’ Calman software. For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, click here.

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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)

The Raptor 27’s native color gamut is both large and accurate. Razer claims 95% coverage of DCI-P3, and we measured over 94%. It’s one of the few monitors to hit all the green targets. Only slight hue errors in yellow and magenta can be seen in the chart. But an average error of 1.99dE means visually perfect color accuracy.

Calibration puts every measurement inside its target square. It truly doesn’t get better than this.

For color purists who prefer the smaller gamut for SDR content, Rec.709 and THX can fill the bill. Of the two, THX is a little better. 709 mode over-saturates red a little, though the error is quite small. Both modes have a slightly warm white point as well, but overall quality is still very high.

Comparisons

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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Razer Raptor 27

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The result shown here is the Raptor 27’s Custom mode, with our calibration in place. Not many monitors can boast a color error under 1dE. The Raptor is 0.92dE. THX and Rec.709 modes are both under 2dE, which renders them visually perfect in the gamut test.

Extended color monitors are getting more colorful with each new model. The Raptor 27 almost leads the pack with 94.03% coverage of DCI-P3. Only green comes up a tiny bit short but visually, it will be hard to tell the difference between the Razer and the Viotek. In the Rec.709 and THX modes, its sRGB volume is 97.63%, also visually perfect. One could use the Raptor 27 for color-critical work without a compensating profile.

Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.
  • herrwizo
    Interesting to see both favourable (here) and completely unfavourable reviews (on other sites) for this monitor. This alone makes it a very questionable choice, despite the great design.
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    Wasn't this monitor the one they didn't like in Hardware Unboxed?

    For the price, this thing was underwhelming, if I remember correctly?

    Regards.
    Reply
  • cknobman
    THX stopped meaning squat years ago when it just turned into a "pay to play" game. They just diluted their brand and standards in order to make a "tier" for even junk to have their sticker applied to it.

    Today THX just means the company wasted money on a useless cert and I dont wanna pay extra for it.
    Reply
  • coloradoblah
    cknobman said:
    THX stopped meaning squat years ago when it just turned into a "pay to play" game. They just diluted their brand and standards in order to make a "tier" for even junk to have their sticker applied to it.

    Today THX just means the company wasted money on a useless cert and I dont wanna pay extra for it.
    Razer bought THX lol, but yes it means nothing these days, it’s too bad, used to be great stuff
    Reply
  • saunupe1911
    The lack of HDMI 2.1 is unacceptable.

    I'm not buying any laptop, monitor, or video input/output device that doesn't include HDMI 2.1 unless I'm certain all I want to do is 4k 60hz 10 bit HDR
    Reply
  • sizzling
    £899 they are having a laugh for this spec, it would be expensive with £400 knocked off. I have the ASUS PG279QM on order for just over a £100 less than this and that is 240Hz, G-Sync (not G-Sync Compatible) and has NVidia Reflex.
    Reply
  • coloradoblah
    saunupe1911 said:
    The lack of HDMI 2.1 is unacceptable.

    I'm not buying any laptop, monitor, or video input/output device that doesn't include HDMI 2.1 unless I'm certain all I want to do is 4k 60hz 10 bit HDR
    Isnt this a 1440p monitor?
    Reply
  • SkyBill40
    coloradoblah said:
    Isnt this a 1440p monitor?

    Sure is.

    On a note about this monitor, Hardware Unboxed blasted it somewhat fiercely and deservedly so. What Razer is providing in this monitor doesn't come close to matching up with the price. Far better can be had for cheaper. I say this as a Razer fan, too. In no way, shape, or form would I consider buying this monitor for anything above $500 (if even that). This is just... shameful.
    Reply
  • Hellbound
    I'm actually amazed at the oversimplified review of this monitor. This monitor is very much overpriced crap.. Want a real review? Watch this one from Hardware Unboxed.
    XQvPf4ZM7IcView: https://youtu.be/XQvPf4ZM7Ic
    Reply
  • coloradoblah
    SkyBill40 said:
    Sure is.

    On a note about this monitor, Hardware Unboxed blasted it somewhat fiercely and deservedly so. What Razer is providing in this monitor doesn't come close to matching up with the price. Far better can be had for cheaper. I say this as a Razer fan, too. In no way, shape, or form would I consider buying this monitor for anything above $500 (if even that). This is just... shameful.

    Ok I missed you mentioned output, I’m not surprised by the price, Razer always charged a premium like Apple but without their quality control or customer service.
    Reply