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Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal), Reviewed In Depth

Keyboard/Mouse Shortcuts

With so much focus on the emerging multi-touch input paradigm, we can't forget about traditional computers with a keyboard and mouse. Fear not, Unity doesn't neglect the trusty old keyboard shortcuts, and there are a few mouse tricks as well. The table below lists all of the keyboard shortcuts relating to the Panel, the Launcher, and Dash:

Keyboard ShortcutFunction
Alt + F1Activates Launcher (use up/down arrow keys to scroll through Launcher entries)
Windows keyActivates Dash
Windows key (hold)Show Launcher
Windows key (hold) + 1-0Switches to or opens corresponding Launcher entry
Windows key + Shift + 1-0Opens corresponding Launcher entry
Windows key (hold) + SActivates Workspace Switcher
Windows key (hold) + AActivates Applications Lens
Windows key (hold) + FActivates
Windows key (hold) + TFiles & Folders Lens
Windows key (hold) + DOpens Trash in Nautilus
Windows key (hold) + WMinimizes/Restores all windows
Shift + Alt + Up arrowActivates Window Spread for all Workspaces
Ctrl + Alt + Arrow keysSwitches between Workspaces
Ctrl + Alt + Shift + Arrow keysMoves active window between Workspaces
Alt + TabSwitches between windows
Alt + F4Closes the active window
Alt + F7Locks active window in movement mode
Alt + F9Minimizes active window
Alt + F10Maximizes/Restores active window
Alt + F2Activates Dash in Run Command Mode
Ctrl + Alt + TOpens Terminal
F10Opens first Panel indicator menu (use up/down arrow keys to scroll through menu items - use left/right arrow keys to scroll through indicator menus)
Ctrl + Alt + LLock Screen
Prt ScrTakes a screenshot of the entire screen
Alt + Prt ScrTakes a screenshot of the active window
EscExits currently selected menu/Launcher/Dash/Workspace Switcher

Next up, we have the number pad. While the mouse and uTouch can snap windows to the left or right half of the screen, keyboard shortcuts open up new ways to tile windows. Pressing Ctrl, Alt, and a number on the number pad activates various window controls, including an expanded snap feature that can only be accessed via these keyboard shortcuts. As far as we can tell, this is the only way to enable quad and horizontal snap without installing additional packages and doing some tweaking.

Image 1 of 2

Horizontal Window Snap

Image 2 of 2

Quad Window Snap

Keyboard ShortcutFunction
Ctrl + Alt + Num 0Maximizes currently selected window
Ctrl + Alt + Num 1Snaps currently selected window to the bottom left quadrant
Ctrl + Alt + Num 2Snaps currently selected window to the bottom half of the screen
Ctrl + Alt + Num 3Snaps currently selected window to the bottom right quadrant
Ctrl + Alt + Num 4Snaps currently selected window to the left half of the screen
Ctrl + Alt + Num 5Centers currently selected window (press repeatedly to resize)
Ctrl + Alt + Num 6Snaps currently selected window to the right half of the screen
Ctrl + Alt + Num 7Snaps currently selected window to the top left quadrant
Ctrl + Alt + Num 8Snaps currently selected window to the top half of the screen
Ctrl + Alt + Num 9Snaps currently selected window to the top right quadrant

Along with the stack of keyboard shortcuts, Unity also has a handful of shortcuts for the mouse.

Mouse ShortcutFunction
Scroll wheel over LauncherScroll through Launcher entries
Scroll wheel over volume indicatorAdjusts volume
Third-button click (press scroll wheel) on Launcher entryOpens another instance of Launcher entry if already open
  • jryan388
    One problem I faced with the standard unity desktop is the horrible performance even on my Athlon II @ 3.6 and Radeon 5750. I upgraded on launch day, so maybe canonical fixed it by now, but the performance was absolutely abysmal. The easiest fix is the unity-2d package. Great performance, doesn't look any worse.
    Reply
  • ksa-_-jed
    U should add more distros to the benchmarks like Debian, Fedora, and open SUSE.
    Reply
  • shiftmx112
    Meh is exactly how I described 10.10 Still gonna try Unity.
    Reply
  • Yuka
    11.04 sucks; plain and simple.

    Power users can do little to nothing to fix things between gnome3 and the buggy Unity.

    I wouldn't even bother with 11.04 when 10.04 is rock solid.

    Cheers!
    Reply
  • davewolfgang
    I tried the upgrade, but unity is blech. I am still using the upgrade, but doing the classic.

    But I may go back to 10.10 for my EeePC.
    Reply
  • adamovera
    jryan388One problem I faced with the standard unity desktop is the horrible performance even on my Athlon II @ 3.6 and Radeon 5750. I upgraded on launch day, so maybe canonical fixed it by now, but the performance was absolutely abysmal. The easiest fix is the unity-2d package. Great performance, doesn't look any worse.Wow, that isn't right, the old X2 test system which has a considerably older Nvidia card runs it great. What's the full specs?
    Reply
  • adamovera
    ksa-_-jedU should add more distros to the benchmarks like Debian, Fedora, and open SUSE.Fedora 15/GNOME 3 coming up next. I have never had any luck whatsoever with openSUSE, will keep trying new versions as they come out though.
    Reply
  • bellman80
    I tried 11.04. Unity was more annoying than useful. I installed the new Linux Mint instead, I'm a happy camper now.
    Reply
  • Tamz_msc
    I'm going to stick with 10.04, because it has been running rock-solid without a glitch for almost a year. It was able to find drivers for my on-board audio which even Windows 7 could not find.

    Unity is not my cup of tea., though I'm looking forward to GNOME 3.0.

    Till then Lucid Lynx FTW!
    Reply
  • RogueKitsune
    Unity is a nice idea, but not my cup of tea. Overall I am happy with the changes in 11.04. Right now i have my laptop(AMD Turion x2, radeon x1200)running it with no problems(everything worked out of the box)
    Reply