NEC Develops Batteries With 30% Greater Charge Densities

According to the company, it has developed a prototype of a manganese lithium-ion battery that use cathodes to support higher voltages as well as a fluorinated electrolyte solution that is much more resistant to oxidation than the common carbonate-based solvents. It also acts as a stabilizer for those higher voltage operations.

NEC said that it was able to increase the operating voltage from 3.8 V to 4.5 V and achieved a 30 percent greater charge capacity at any given weight of the battery as a result. The prototype charge density was 200 Wh/kg, which is up from 150 Wh/kg in current batteries.

There is still some research required before such batteries could see commercial production. NEC noted that the technology only maintains about 80 percent of original capacity with 500 full charge and discharge cycles in conditions below room temperature (68 degrees F), while maintaining roughly 60% when above room temperature (113 degrees F).

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  • archange
    Quote:
    According to the company, it has developed a prototype of a manganese lithium-ion battery that use cathodes to support higher voltages as well as a fluorinated electrolyte solution that is much more resistant to oxidation than the common carbonate-based solvents.


    Not to nitpick, I'm cheering for more battery life as much as the next guy, but isn't that more toxic as well?
    6
  • srhelicity
    Quote:
    while maintaining roughly 60% when above room temperature (113 degrees F).


    If 113 F is room temperature, I don't want to be in that room!
    3
  • danwat1234
    retains 60% capacity? More research needed indeed. Reminds me of Envia and how they are making lithium batteries with more energy density, but of course the increased capacity doesn't hold after it's used x many cycles.
    Nanowire lithium ion FTW?
    0