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Foremay Enterprise SSDs with SAS 6.0 Gbps

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 24 comments

New SSDs geared for high-end gaming, medical imaging, and more.

Thursday Foremay revealed its EC188 D-series 2.5-inch and 3.5-inch solid state drive series designed for enterprise servers and workstations applications. The company is currently shipping the drives in small quantities for now, however Foremay indicated that volume production is scheduled to kick in sometime in August.

Boasting a SAS (serial Attached SCSI) 6.0 Gbps interface, the new EC188 D-series offers capacities of up to 400 GB. Foremay's SSDs also deliver high random read/write IOPs up to 30,000/25,000, read speeds of up to 250 MB/s, and write speeds of up to 200 MB/s. Foremay said that this new line is ideal for 3D modeling, medical imagine, high end gaming machines, and many other applications.

"Our SAS solid state drives are designed to meet the ever increasing demands for SSD applications for enterprise servers and other high end computing machines," said Jason Hoover, Foremay’s VP Marketing. "With high IOPS, high reliability and long endurance combined in the SAS SSD, system owners can now significantly reduce the system hardware TOC and maintenance cost, as well as annual electricity bills, especially in large scale enterprise server clusters and data centers."

The full press release can be accessed in PDF form here. Stay tuned for actual drive capacities, availability, and pricing.

Display 24 Comments.
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  • 5 Hide
    babybeluga , April 30, 2010 10:10 PM
    A price range would have been nice.
  • -4 Hide
    restatement3dofted , April 30, 2010 10:11 PM
    High-end gaming thrown in with medical imaging and 3D modeling? Since gaming benefits so greatly from the addition of a SSD, right? "Oh, thank God, I won't get any boost to FPS, but I can kiss those eight pesky seconds of load times every hour goodbye! And for only a few hundred dollars!"
  • 8 Hide
    spoofedpacket , April 30, 2010 10:24 PM
    "Foremay Enterprise SSDs with SAS 6.0 Gbps"

    Why not just say SAS2? Just about every SAS drive today has this interface, with SAS1 drives going end of life rapidly.

    restatement, you aren't going to really see much gain off a SAS2 drive for gaming. Just about everything multiplayer has a timer at the start of matches to let the slow machines get loaded as to not give the SSD people an advantage. My Intel SSD does load levels quicker but I'm still sitting there twiddling my thumbs for 15 seconds.
  • 1 Hide
    backin5 , April 30, 2010 10:29 PM
    Quote:
    medical imagine


    I believe you meant to write "medical imaging", Kevin.
  • 1 Hide
    hajila , April 30, 2010 10:29 PM
    My computer is topped out in every other aspect, but I was always bottlenecking on the hard drive. Going from a 7,200 rpm hard drive to a high performance SSD did improve my fps. I now see slightly higher frame rates on high res games, but most importantly it has smoothed out the peaks and valleys of fps. SSD is well worth the money if you need the best.
  • -5 Hide
    sliem , April 30, 2010 10:37 PM
    SSDs are for hardcores: either programmers or gamers. Of course if you've got the money, there's no stopping you. "Hey I'm rich, I bought 256GB SSD because I need to check my emails and browse internet at the same time."
  • 4 Hide
    Anonymous , April 30, 2010 11:53 PM
    From an enterprise standpoint, those IOPS numbers are insane for 1 disk. When you are pushing a 100% virtual environment running everything on a high speed SAN, the first bottleneck you will come to is IOPS on the SAN. A high quality SAN filled with those disks would achieve 100x the IOPS of a lot of current SANs out there now. Impressive.
  • -5 Hide
    lauxenburg , May 1, 2010 12:24 AM
    Meh, I still don't see why Enterprise drives have to be SAS. There isn't much difference between SAS and SATA....honestly. And the cheapest SAS drives cost more than my Motherboard and CPU combined...
  • 0 Hide
    bison88 , May 1, 2010 12:58 AM
    hajilaMy computer is topped out in every other aspect, but I was always bottlenecking on the hard drive. Going from a 7,200 rpm hard drive to a high performance SSD did improve my fps. I now see slightly higher frame rates on high res games, but most importantly it has smoothed out the peaks and valleys of fps. SSD is well worth the money if you need the best.



    Very true, I never even thought about it until I spent the money later on in life to buy a high speed system. The hard drive transfer rates really kill an otherwise superior hardware machine. I finally took the steps to invest in a RAID0 system though. I got (3) 640GB WD Black drives for 1/3 the price total of one 256GB SSD. Read and Write speeds pushing nearly 300MB. I am extremely happy. Someday prices will come down and I can hopefully upgrade those three drives with 3 2TB SSD's without having to spend more then $500. Hopefully its this decade.
  • -3 Hide
    shin0bi272 , May 1, 2010 1:32 AM
    backin5I believe you meant to write "medical imaging", Kevin.

    no hes been watching that GE commercial too much the one where they play "so happy together" in the background...
  • 0 Hide
    Marco925 , May 1, 2010 2:17 AM
    Finally! SSDs make it to SCSI!


    babybelugaA price range would have been nice.



    At this point, I think they're going to listed for $H

    Where the H stands for Heart Attack
  • 1 Hide
    cdillon , May 1, 2010 6:31 AM
    lauxenburgMeh, I still don't see why Enterprise drives have to be SAS. There isn't much difference between SAS and SATA....honestly. And the cheapest SAS drives cost more than my Motherboard and CPU combined...


    "Honestly"? As if you actually know the difference? If you did, you'd know there's some important differences between SAS and SATA. SAS uses the SCSI protocol, which means it inherited all the advantages of SCSI, including the RAS (Reliability, Availability, Serviceability) functionality which SATA mostly lacks. This is why you will always find SCSI-based devices (Fiber Channel uses SCSI as well) in use when people really value their data. SAS also gets the high-end features before SATA does. SAS was doing 6G, expanders, multi-lane, etc., long before SATA did. SAS drives typically also have dual ports for redundant controller configurations (there's that "RAS" thing again) which SATA will probably never have.
  • 0 Hide
    Gin Fushicho , May 1, 2010 7:06 AM
    Neat... but I've never owned anything with SCSI support.
  • -3 Hide
    dzban , May 1, 2010 8:24 AM
    spoofedpacket"Foremay Enterprise SSDs with SAS 6.0 Gbps"Why not just say SAS2? Just about every SAS drive today has this interface, with SAS1 drives going end of life rapidly.restatement, you aren't going to really see much gain off a SAS2 drive for gaming. Just about everything multiplayer has a timer at the start of matches to let the slow machines get loaded as to not give the SSD people an advantage. My Intel SSD does load levels quicker but I'm still sitting there twiddling my thumbs for 15 seconds.


    So you say your SSD loads level in multiplayer game in 0 seconds?
    Hell yeah.
  • -3 Hide
    JohnnyLucky , May 1, 2010 3:16 PM
    Interesting article but I think it is pretty much old info in the commercial IT arena.
  • -3 Hide
    buwish , May 1, 2010 9:43 PM
    I'm wondering what the true saturation rate of SAS is using the 6Gbps SATA. But yes, a bit dated news, but it shows promise for Enterprises.
  • 1 Hide
    nebun , May 2, 2010 4:30 PM
    babybelugaA price range would have been nice.


    what for? you can't afford it :p 
  • -3 Hide
    lauxenburg , May 2, 2010 8:39 PM
    cdillon"Honestly"? As if you actually know the difference? If you did, you'd know there's some important differences between SAS and SATA. SAS uses the SCSI protocol, which means it inherited all the advantages of SCSI, including the RAS (Reliability, Availability, Serviceability) functionality which SATA mostly lacks. This is why you will always find SCSI-based devices (Fiber Channel uses SCSI as well) in use when people really value their data. SAS also gets the high-end features before SATA does. SAS was doing 6G, expanders,
    multi-lane, etc., long before SATA did. SAS drives typically also have dual ports for redundant controller configurations (there's that "RAS" thing again) which SATA will probably never have.


    The article you will notice, says it is supposed to be desktop oriented...which makes little sense for a SAS drive as they are mission critical based. I'd use SATA for any applications like that.
  • 2 Hide
    sandmanwn , May 2, 2010 9:04 PM
    lauxenburgThe article you will notice, says it is supposed to be desktop oriented...which makes little sense for a SAS drive as they are mission critical based. I'd use SATA for any applications like that.

    From the article and the manufacturer:
    Quote:
    "Our SAS solid state drives are designed to meet the ever increasing demands for SSD applications for enterprise servers and other high end computing machines,"

    Kevin Parrish said it was good for gaming, but he's just blowing smoke out his ass.
  • 1 Hide
    rbarone69 , May 3, 2010 3:04 AM
    sliemSSDs are for hardcores: either programmers or gamers. Of course if you've got the money, there's no stopping you. "Hey I'm rich, I bought 256GB SSD because I need to check my emails and browse internet at the same time."


    My mother has a ton of pictures & vids she puts on her laptop. That and a load of other pointless programs that I cant stand but she likes. Even with adequate ram, the system thrashes for what seems like ages on bootup and waits while tasks like indexing virus scanning and things of that nature complete. Added an SSD, poof, fast system that stays fast.

    Rich or not, SSD does make life better on laptops. Even for the average user. System ever get slow over time for you? Ever want to shoot yourself after fixing mom's computer?

    within 5 years, you will see more SSD than HDs in new laptops & systems b/c the advantages ARE THAT GREAT.

    Just as SSDs improve your experience on the computer, I urge everyone to consider buying a quality chair and get out of that $60 office max you're probably sitting on. I know your back hurts, so why not invest money into that before you buy your SSD... Your body cant be upgraded later. hehe..
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