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AMD Attacking Cloud Gaming with Radeon Sky

By - Source: AMD | B 43 comments

Look out Nvidia: AMD has just entered the cloud gaming backbone business.

This week during GDC 2013, AMD revealed Radeon Sky Graphics, a component of AMD's Unified Gaming Strategy spanning consoles, cloud platforms, tablets and PCs. It's a new cloud gaming platform built from the ground up on AMD's Graphics Core Next architecture. It is powered by the company's RapidFire technology, which enables highly efficient and responsive game streaming.

"Real-time gaming through the cloud represents a significant opportunity and AMD is poised to lead in this vertical thanks to our extensive graphics hardware and software capabilities," said David Cummings, senior director, AMD Professional Graphics. "AMD is working closely with CiiNow, G-Cluster, Otoy and Ubitus to deliver exceptional AMD Radeon gaming experiences to the cloud."

AMD's Radeon Sky is offered in three models, two of which are full-height full-length dual-slot cards and one that is a full-height full-length single-slot card. All three support RapidFire technology, PowerTune Technology, and DirectX 11.1 (full according to AMD), and use a PCIe 3.0 x16 bus interface.

The specs show that the Radeon Sky 900 features a core clock speed of 825 MHz and 6 GB of GDDR5 memory (3 GB per GPU). It also has a 384-bit memory interface, a 480 GB/s memory bandwidth, and a TDP of 300 W. This card does not support AMD's ZeroCore Power Technology.

The next card in line, the Radeon Sky 700, has a core clock speed of 900 MHz and 6 GB of GDDR5 memory. It also uses a 384-bit memory interface, but the bandwidth is a smaller 264 GB/s. The TDP is also smaller, requiring 225 W.

The last card on the list, the Radeon Sky 500, is the only single-slot card in the group. It features a core clock speed of 950 MHz and only 4 GB of GDDR5 memory. The memory interface is 256-bit and the bandwidth is 154 GB/s, while the card's TDP is a lower 150 W.

AMD says the secret sauce to its Radeon Sky solutions is in the RapidFire technology. "[It's] a combination of hardware and software that enables cloud gaming partners to benefit from an open API that simplifies the manipulation of key hardware controls to provide HD visual quality, minimal latency and optimal network bandwidth resulting in a compelling and responsive gaming experience from any device over the internet," the company said.

AMD's Radeon Sky solutions are seemingly in direct response to Nvidia's cloud-based streaming technology, GRID. Nvidia says it's ideal for on-demand gaming as a service (GaaS), and even provides advantages over traditional console gaming systems because titles can be streamed to multiple form factors, not just one locked hardware set.

For more information about AMD's cloud gaming solution, the Radeon Sky Series, head here. As previously stated, current partners include Otoy, G-cluster Global and CiiNow.

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Top Comments
  • 19 Hide
    anxiousinfusion , March 29, 2013 8:38 AM
    Cloud gaming is only good for turn based games at best.
  • 16 Hide
    azraa , March 29, 2013 9:56 AM
    Built-in recording/streaming solution: yes please.
    Cool new software, TressFX, the Birds thingie: yes please!
    Cloud gaming. GTFO.

    That's just the way it is, i'm sorry.
  • 12 Hide
    jaber2 , March 29, 2013 9:02 AM
    Is there is a big demand for cloud based games? or is this just all for not?
Other Comments
  • 19 Hide
    anxiousinfusion , March 29, 2013 8:38 AM
    Cloud gaming is only good for turn based games at best.
  • 12 Hide
    jaber2 , March 29, 2013 9:02 AM
    Is there is a big demand for cloud based games? or is this just all for not?
  • -1 Hide
    spentshells , March 29, 2013 9:47 AM
    Jaber2 how do you feel about it? That feeling is likely very widespread across the gaming community
  • 16 Hide
    azraa , March 29, 2013 9:56 AM
    Built-in recording/streaming solution: yes please.
    Cool new software, TressFX, the Birds thingie: yes please!
    Cloud gaming. GTFO.

    That's just the way it is, i'm sorry.
  • 8 Hide
    A Bad Day , March 29, 2013 9:56 AM
    jaber2Is there is a big demand for cloud based games? or is this just all for not?


    Late 19th century:

    "I want a faster horse. Not a damn horseless carriage you numbnut!"


    On serious note, the only application I see for cloud gaming are for smartphones and tablets.

    The question is, WILL the ISPs be ready for it? Considering the fact that a "true" broadband connection is unheard of in many areas in the US (Dial-up or satellite), and other areas have to put up with $9001 for a connection that MIGHT peak at 100 MB/s.
  • 8 Hide
    blppt , March 29, 2013 9:57 AM
    I still dont understand how people expect cloud gaming to take over---with even a GREAT internet connection, latencies vs a local computer rendering the game-should be terrible. I often wonder how PS3/Xbox owners play a FPS with a wireless controller and a wireless internet connection at the same time---this trend is taking latency to a whole other level entirely.
  • 5 Hide
    Onus , March 29, 2013 9:59 AM
    More vapor-based "stuff;" sorry, I'm just not interested. The [reliable] bandwidth simply isn't there.
  • 0 Hide
    A Bad Day , March 29, 2013 10:00 AM
    blpptI still dont understand how people expect cloud gaming to take over---with even a GREAT internet connection, latencies vs a local computer rendering the game-should be terrible.


    Not if you live in South Korea...
  • 6 Hide
    dextermat , March 29, 2013 10:16 AM
    Not happening in canada where intenet is slow and expensive
  • 2 Hide
    ojas , March 29, 2013 10:19 AM
    Note to writer: You do realise that "attacking" suggests aggression towards something?

    Not investing in, helping, etc.

    Man, the US needs to stop going to war, attacking is somehow percieved as being good for the attacked, now! :p 
  • 2 Hide
    bmyton , March 29, 2013 10:29 AM
    Latency will always be a killer. Even using Splashtop over an N wireless network introduces too much latency to play MMORPGs. FPS isn't even close.
  • 5 Hide
    dalethepcman , March 29, 2013 10:40 AM
    Quote:
    6 GB of GDDR5 memory (3 GB per GPU). It also has a 384-bit memory interface, a 480 GB/s memory bandwidth, and a TDP of 300 W.


    Now I know where all the 7990's went...

    I see this being much more useful if you were able to host and distribute your own mini cloud at home. I don't think cloud gaming en mass is commercially viable in the US with our data caps and broadband penetration (just ask OnLive.) Over a home network though, this could breath new life into an otherwise boring low end desktop, laptop or smart tv.
  • 0 Hide
    mikenygmail , March 29, 2013 10:55 AM
    This might actually give PC gaming a boost, since it will be a lot cheaper to get started.
  • 7 Hide
    dalethepcman , March 29, 2013 10:55 AM
    blpptI often wonder how PS3/Xbox owners play a FPS with a wireless controller and a wireless internet connection at the same time---this trend is taking latency to a whole other level entirely.
    Learn something about wireless technology and networking.

    When your talking about the speed any energy form travels 1ms is an eternity. Even the speed of sound travels 10 feet in 1ms, where as microwave (wifi) radiation travels 1,890 miles in 1ms (that's also the speed of light.)

    The only reason ping times across the internet are not less than 12ms to cross the globe is the amount of processing time required to correctly route your packets, and signal loss that requires re-amplification.

    The latency of your connection is directly proportional to the number of devices between you and your destination(90%), and to a much lesser extent the distance(9%) and type of network(1%).
  • 4 Hide
    internetlad , March 29, 2013 10:57 AM
    I picture this taking a while to catch on in north america and russia, but in places with tightly packed cities, high population centers and blisteringly fast internet speeds (europe, parts of asia) I can surely see this being a boon for gamers living from paycheck to paycheck without the means to drop on a 300 dollar card.
  • 2 Hide
    mikenygmail , March 29, 2013 10:57 AM
    If some day it seems like Cloud Computing will really take off, just be sure to stockpile some good spec gaming PC's, DVD games and other software while you can...
  • -5 Hide
    blurr91 , March 29, 2013 10:58 AM
    This is more about the next "brand" name for Radeon video cards than about gaming in the cloud.

    Radeon numbering scheme hit 9800 long time ago. Then what? We got Radeon X900, and then X1900. Then it was HD 2900. Now we are at HD 7900. AMD is running out of numbers again. So the "HD"monikor will become "Sky" and we will recycle all the numbers...again.
  • -5 Hide
    mikenygmail , March 29, 2013 10:59 AM
    dalethepcmanLearn something about wireless technology and networking. When your talking about the speed any energy form travels 1ms is an eternity.


    Learn something about basic english. When your talking? Really?
  • 6 Hide
    hyperstalker , March 29, 2013 11:33 AM
    mikenygmailLearn something about basic english. When your talking? Really?

    I'm glad out of his very informative post you pickup on a grammar mistake...
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , March 29, 2013 11:39 AM
    tried a cloud gaming demo on my computer with 6Mbytes/s wired connection and it still was no where near as good as the real thing
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