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Lenovo Recalling More All-in-One Desktops for Fire Hazard

The Lenovo All-In-One desktops are elegant, sleek… and apparently fire hazards.

Due to overheating issues, Lenovo is recalling another 15,000 AIO desktops. In addition to the 13,000 that the company recalled last month, the total for recalled AIOs comes to 188,000.

Lenovo’s expanded the recall range date to be from May 2010 to March 2012. The recalled ThinkCentres were equipped with a faulty power supply that’s causing the overheating issues. For some, the overheating issue’s been so severe that two Lenovo customers have reported that their AIO’s caught fire.

If you happen to own a ThinkCentre M70z or M90z that fall into that date range, now might be a good idea to alert Lenovo. You can determine whether or not your M70z or M90z is eligible for a power supply replacement via Lenovo’s recall page on their official website, which details the entire screening process.

  • ddan49
    This adds a WHOLE new meaning to "blazing fast"...

    Eh? Ehh?
    Reply
  • One has to question how these "All in ones" were tested. I think their is way too much emphasis on quiet instead of cooling. But I also have to wonder why the other safety features don't work? Such as the temp sensor on the CPU. I think their must be more to it then what Lenovo is saying. Apple has done "All in ones" for a long time, so has HP and Dell. None of which have had significant over heating issues and all use Intel chips.
    Reply
  • After reading the Lenovo recall notice. it seems the problem is more related to over heated power supplies. I guess they designed a little too weak on the PSU.
    Reply
  • nforce4max
    Smoking hot computing ;)
    Reply
  • deicided
    haha we have 300 of the bastard M90z sat in our warehouse right now :(
    Reply
  • fb39ca4
    That's what you get when you use $10 PSUs in your products, Lenovo.
    Reply
  • sixdegree
    With this, Lenovo is now worthy of rivaling Nvidia.
    Reply
  • chewy1963
    LMAO, I bet IBM is sure glad their name aren't on these any more! Come on baby light my fire!
    Reply
  • alextheblue
    jescott418After reading the Lenovo recall notice. it seems the problem is more related to over heated power supplies. I guess they designed a little too weak on the PSU.Seriously, you couldn't read a few paragraphs in the Tom's news article? They mention "power supply" twice. Maybe they need to TL;DR all their articles for "Today's Readers".

    TL;DR - Power supply make fire! Fire bad!fb39ca4That's what you get when you use $10 PSUs in your products, Lenovo.They all do it. Outside of highend systems and boutique builds, all the mass produced OEM boxes use dirt cheap PSUs. The really bad part? The majority of these OEM junk boxes don't have any issues for years, so long as you don't add/upgrade anything that will tax the PSU more than stock components. Very little headroom, and generally not very efficient, even when they're otherwise dependable.
    Reply
  • jamie_1318
    jescott418One has to question how these "All in ones" were tested. I think their is way too much emphasis on quiet instead of cooling. But I also have to wonder why the other safety features don't work? Such as the temp sensor on the CPU. I think their must be more to it then what Lenovo is saying. Apple has done "All in ones" for a long time, so has HP and Dell. None of which have had significant over heating issues and all use Intel chips.
    CPU thermal sensor is irrelevant in a PSU failure. For the CPU to get hot enough to shut down a fire would have already started and become self-sufficient down in the power supply. same is more or less true for the mobo thermal sensor(assuming they have one). The thermal limits on AIO Desktops are already quite high, it would even further delay any automatic shutdown.

    As many others have pointed out Lenovo obviously used cheap and poorly protected power supplies. clearly very badly designed for them to catch fire before anything stops it indeed. Destroying a computer is one thing but risking homes, and more importantly lives is another. Especially odd for a respectable company like Lenovo.
    Reply