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RCA Has a Mobile TV Android Tablet On The Way

By - Source: RCA | B 7 comments

This 8-inch Android tablet can pull Digital TV and Dyle Mobile TV signals out of the air.

RCA is set to reveal a Mobile TV Tablet (Model DDA850RF) next week at CES 2013 that's slated as the "world's first" dual-tuner mobile TV. But don't let the description fool you: in addition to receiving over-the-air Digital TV stations and the Dyle Mobile TV service, it's a full-fledged 8-inch Android tablet packed with Wi-Fi connectivity, dual-cameras and GPS functionality.

According to RCA, the Mobile TV Tablet will have on-the-go access to 130 mobile TV stations throughout the country thanks to the Dyle mobile TV service. Unfortunately, service isn't provided from coast to coast, but rather limited to over thirty cities across the nation. However for those able to receive the signal, Dyle mobile TV is available with no subscription fee through the end of 2013.

"Dyle mobile TV is a service that gives you the ability to watch live, local broadcast television on select mobile devices in select cities. Using a special mobile digital broadcast signal, we are able to deliver programming from our participating networks. So save your bandwidth, and watch TV on your device over the air," reads the product description.

For those not living in a Dyle mobile TV zone, the tablet can pick up local Digital TV signals over the air. If that also isn't acceptable, users may be able to stream TV via a wireless network from supporting cable operators. As previously mentioned, the device is a fully-functional Android-based 8-inch tablet with access to Google Play, so users can fall back on Hulu Plus, Time Warner and other video streaming services.

RCA said on Friday that the tablet will have an 8-inch IPS touchscreen with a 1024 x 768 resolution, powered by a Cortex A5 SoC clocked at 1 Ghz, and 1 GB of RAM. Other hardware features will include 8 GB of internal storage, 802.11 b/g/n connectivity, front and rear-mounted cameras, twin speakers, integrated GPS, and USB, microUSB and HDMI connectivity. Battery life promises up to four hours in mobile TV mode, or up to 10 hours when web browsing.

RCA said that the TV-based Android tablet will hit retail stores this Spring with a suggested price of $299 USD. We'll take a closer look at this mobile TV tablet in Las Vegas.

 

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  • 6 Hide
    madjimms , January 6, 2013 7:18 PM
    I just realized I haven't seen an RCA product in like 5 years....
  • 2 Hide
    xpeh , January 6, 2013 8:03 PM
    Among me and my friends, RCA is known as 'Really Crappy Appliances.' I don't expect much quality from this tablet/TV
  • 2 Hide
    jhansonxi , January 6, 2013 8:42 PM
    RCA doesn't really exist as a company:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RCA
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RCA_%28trademark%29
  • Display all 7 comments.
  • 1 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , January 6, 2013 9:38 PM
    RCA is still around?
  • 0 Hide
    freggo , January 7, 2013 5:41 AM
    It is aimed at mobile TV yet has a 1024x768 screen?
    Why not 1280x720 then ???
  • 0 Hide
    g00fysmiley , January 7, 2013 5:54 PM
    honestly surprised more poeple don't include over the air antennas in tablets
  • 0 Hide
    sun-devil99 , January 11, 2013 8:24 PM
    xpehAmong me and my friends, RCA is known as 'Really Crappy Appliances.' I don't expect much quality from this tablet/TV


    I have to agree. When I was a kid we have this giant 24" (well in 1981 it was giant) RCA console TV growing up. Really nice TV, think we only ever had to have it serviced once. That TV has lasted at least 22-years before we gifted it to a friend of mine. Lost contact with them so have no idea if the TV is still working. But, in the early 2000's I had an RCA TV and multi-disc CD player, did't last more than a few years each. RCA is a brand I tend to avoid now.