Best Graphics Cards for Gaming in 2024

Nvidia GeForce RTX 4070 Founders Edition
(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The best graphics cards are the beating heart of any gaming PC, and everything else comes second. Without a powerful GPU pushing pixels, even the fastest CPU won't manage much. While no one graphics card will be right for everyone, we'll provide options for every budget and mindset below. Whether you're after the fastest graphics card, the best value, or the best card at a given price, we've got you covered.

Where our GPU benchmarks hierarchy ranks all of the cards based purely on performance, our list of the best graphics cards looks at the whole package. Current GPU pricing, performance, features, efficiency, and availability are all important, though the weighting becomes more subjective. Factoring in all of those aspects, these are the best graphics cards that are currently available.

February 2024 Update

Alongside the increasing RTX 4090 prices, we had four new GPUs launch last month: RTX 4080 Super, RTX 4070 Ti Super, RTX 4070 Super, and RX 7600 XT. Some previously available models are now discontinued, and we've updated a few of our picks as appropriate.

Last month saw the launch of four new GPUs: RTX 4080 Super, RTX 4070 Ti Super, RTX 4070 Super, and RX 7600 XT. We've added those to our performance charts, and some of the new cards replace former entries on our list. With those newcomers, AMD and Nvidia have wrapped up their latest generation GPU lineups as far as we know — unless there are still plans for an RTX 4050 at the bottom of the Nvidia stack.

It's not clear what such a chip might entail at this point, possibly 8GB of memory on a 128-bit interface (again), or could Nvidia try foisting a 96-bit 6GB card on the market? Hopefully the former rather than the latter, but the recent appearance of an RTX 3050 6GB suggests Nvidia is okay with leaving the budget range to previous generation parts.

There are a few GPUs that are technically available but not readily available in the U.S., like the "made for China" RTX 4090 D as well as AMD's GRE (Golden Rabbit Edition) variants. We're primarily a U.S. and western-focused site, so we'll confine our picks to cards available in the U.S. market.

Intel's Arc Alchemist GPUs rate more as previous generation hardware, as they're manufactured on TSMC N6 and compete more directly against the RTX 3060 and RX 6700 10GB instead of newer parts. However, Arc A750 priced at under $200 (we've seen it sell for as little as $179) remains a very competitive option, if you don't mind the occasional driver snafus and higher power use.

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Graphics Card1080p FPS1440p FPS4K FPSPrice (MSRP)Avg. Power
GeForce RTX 4090187.3137.687.2$1,800 ($1,600)320W
GeForce RTX 4080 Super169.7114.566.1$1,000 ($1,000)258W
GeForce RTX 4080166.3111.363.8$1,201 ($1,200)252W
Radeon RX 7900 XTX148.099.457.8$920 ($1,000)329W
GeForce RTX 4070 Ti Super155.599.255.7$800 ($800)255W
GeForce RTX 4070 Ti149.492.750.7$700 ($800)237W
Radeon RX 7900 XT138.288.549.2$700 ($900)294W
GeForce RTX 4070 Super141.086.046.6$600 ($600)202W
GeForce RTX 4070126.674.339.8$530 ($550)185W
Radeon RX 7800 XT115.269.737.8$490 ($500)242W
Radeon RX 7700 XT103.560.331.2$422 ($450)230W
GeForce RTX 4060 Ti 16GB101.056.129.1$430 ($500)152W
GeForce RTX 4060 Ti101.055.527.7$375 ($400)142W
GeForce RTX 406082.744.522.1$288 ($300)127W
Intel Arc A770 16GB71.643.5$290 ($350)210W
Intel Arc A75066.438.7$210 ($250)199W
Radeon RX 760069.835.0$260 ($270)154W
Intel Arc A38025.0$120 ($140)71W

Note: We're showing current online prices alongside the official launch MSRPs in the above table, with the GPUs sorted by performance. Retail prices can fluctuate quite a bit over the course of a month; the table lists the best we could find at the time of writing.

The above list shows all the current generation graphics cards, in order of performance. If you want to see how these GPUs stack up in comparison to previous generation parts, check our GPU benchmarks hierarchy.

The performance ranking incorporates 15 games from our latest test suite, with both rasterization and ray tracing performance included. Note that we are not including upscaling results in the table, which would generally skew things more in favor of Nvidia GPUs, depending on the selection of games.

While performance can be an important criteria for a lot of gamers, it's not the only metric that matters. Our subjective rankings below factor in price, power, and features colored by our own opinions. Others may offer a slightly different take, but all of the cards on this list are worthy of your consideration.

Best Graphics Cards for Gaming 2024

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Nvidia GeForce RTX 4070 Super Founders Edition unboxing and card photos

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
The best overall GPU right now

Specifications

GPU: AD104
GPU Cores: 7168
Boost Clock: 2,475 MHz
Video RAM: 12GB GDDR6X 21 Gbps
TGP: 200 watts

Reasons to buy

+
Good overall performance
+
Excellent efficiency
+
DLSS, AI, AV1, and ray tracing
+
Improved value over non-Super 4070

Reasons to avoid

-
12GB is the minimum for a $400+ GPU
-
Generational price hike
-
Frame Generation marketing
-
Ugly 16-pin adapters

Nvidia just refreshed its 40-series lineup with the new Super models. Of the three, the RTX 4070 Super will be the most interesting for the most people. It inherits the same $599 MSRP as the non-Super 4070 (which has dropped to $549 to keep it relevant), with all the latest features of the Nvidia Ada Lovelace architecture. It's slightly better than a linear boost in performance relative to price, which is as good as you can hope for these days.

Unlike some of the other models, the RTX 4070 Super also seems to have plenty of base-MSRP models available at retail. We like the stealthy black aesthetic of the Founders Edition, and it runs reasonably cool and quiet, but third-party cards with superior cooling are also available, sometimes at lower prices than the reference card.

The 4070 Super bumps core counts by over 20% compared to the vanilla 4070, and in our testing we've found that the general lack of changes to the memory subsystem doesn't impact performance as much as you might expect. It's still 16% faster overall (at 1440p), even with the same VRAM capacity and bandwidth — though helped by the 33% increase in L2 cache size.

Compared to the previous generation Ampere GPUs, even with less raw bandwidth, the 4070 Super generally matches or beats the RTX 3080 Ti, and delivers clearly superior performance than the RTX 3080. What's truly impressive is that it can do all that while cutting power use by over 100W.

Further Reading:
Nvidia GeForce RTX 4070 Super review

AMD Radeon RX 7800 XT reference card photos

AMD Radeon RX 7800 XT reference card (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
AMD's best overall GPU right now

Specifications

GPU: RDNA 3 Navi 32
GPU Cores: 3840
Boost Clock: 2,430 MHz
Video RAM: 16GB GDDR6 19.5 Gbps
TBP: 263 watts

Reasons to buy

+
Plenty of VRAM and 256-bit interface
+
Great for 1440p and 1080p
+
Strong in rasterization testing
+
AV1 and DP2.1 support

Reasons to avoid

-
Only slightly faster than RX 6800 XT
-
Still lacking in DXR and AI performance
-
Not as efficient as Nvidia

The Radeon RX 7800 XT uses the AMD RDNA 3 architecture and the Navi 32 GPU, and in our view it's the best overall pick of Team Red's current lineup. That's assuming you're like us and tend to want a great 1440p gaming experience while spending as little as possible. There are definitely faster GPUs, and the 7800 XT only ends up tying the previous generation RX 6900 XT — but it does so while cutting the price in half, and beats the lowest street price we ever saw by over $100 as well.

Efficiency has been a bit hit or miss with RDNA 3, but the 7800 XT is one of the better options. It uses about 50W less power than the 6900 XT while delivering roughly the same level of performance, and it's a very capable card overall. It also adds AV1 encoding support and DP2.1 video output, plus improved compute and AI capabilities — it's about 45% faster than the 6900 XT in Stable Diffusion, for example.

AMD continues to offer more bang of the buck in rasterization games than Nvidia, though it also falls behind in ray tracing — sometimes far behind in games like Alan Wake 2 that support full path tracing. Is that something you want to try? It doesn't radically change the gameplay, though it can look better overall. If you're curious about fully path traced games, including future RTX Remix mods, Nvidia remains the best option. Otherwise, AMD's rasterization performance on the 7800 XT ends up beating the 4070 but slightly trailing the 4070 Super.

We're also at the point where buying a new GPU that costs over $500 means we really want to see 16GB of memory. Yes, Nvidia fails in that regard, though in practice it seems as though Nvidia roughly matches AMD's 16GB cards with 12GB offerings. There are exceptions of course, but the RX 7800 XT still checks all the right boxes for a high-end graphics card that's still within reach of most gamers.

Read: AMD Radeon RX 7800 XT review

Nvidia GeForce RTX 4070 Founders Edition

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
A finely-balanced high-end Nvidia GPU

Specifications

GPU: AD104
GPU Cores: 5888
Boost Clock: 2,475 MHz
Video RAM: 12GB GDDR6X 21 Gbps
TGP: 200 watts

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent efficiency and good performance
+
Good for 1440p gaming
+
DLSS, DLSS 3, and DXR features

Reasons to avoid

-
Generational price hike
-
Frame Generation marketing
-
12GB is the minimum we'd want with a $400+ GPU

Nvidia's RTX 4070 didn't blow us away with extreme performance or value, but it's generally equal to the previous generation RTX 3080, comes with the latest Ada Lovelace architecture and features, and costs about $100 less. Now, with the launch of the RTX 4070 Super (see above), it also got a further price cut and the lowest cost cards start at around $530.

Nvidia rarely goes after the true value market segment, but with the price adjustments brought about with the recent 40-series Super cards, things are at least reasonable. The RTX 4070 can still deliver on the promise of ray tracing and DLSS upscaling, it only uses 200W of power (often less), and in raw performance it outpaces AMD's RX 7800 XT — slightly slower in rasterization, faster in ray tracing, plus it has DLSS support.

Nvidia is always keen to point out how much faster the RTX 40-series is, once you enable DLSS 3 Frame Generation. As we've said elsewhere, these generated frames aren't the same as "real" frames and increase input latency. It's not that DLSS 3 is bad, but we prefer to compare non-enhanced performance, and in terms of feel we'd say DLSS 3 improves the experience over the baseline by perhaps 10–20 percent, not the 50–100 percent you'll see in Nvidia's performance charts.

The choice between the RTX 4070 and the above RTX 4070 Super really comes down whether you're willing to pay a bit more for proportionately higher performance, or if you'd rather save money. The two offer nearly the same value proposition otherwise, with the 4070 Super costing 13% more while offering 16% higher performance on average.

Further Reading:
Nvidia GeForce RTX 4070 review

Best Graphics Cards, GeForce RTX 4090

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
The fastest GPU — great for creators, AI, and professionals

Specifications

GPU: Ada AD102
GPU Cores: 16384
Boost Clock: 2,520 MHz
Video RAM: 24GB GDDR6X 21 Gbps
TGP: 450 watts

Reasons to buy

+
The fastest GPU, period
+
Excellent 4K and maybe even 8K gaming
+
Powerful ray tracing hardware
+
DLSS and DLSS 3
+
24GB is great for content creation workloads

Reasons to avoid

-
Extreme price and power requirements
-
Needs a fast CPU and large PSU
-
Frame Generation is a bit gimmicky

For some, the best graphics card is the fastest card, pricing be damned. Nvidia's GeForce RTX 4090 caters to precisely this category of user. It was also the debut of Nvidia's Ada Lovelace architecture and represents the most potent card Nvidia has to offer, possibly until 2025 when the next generation GPUs are rumored to arrive.

Note also that pricing of the RTX 4090 has become quite extreme, with most cards now selling above $2,000 thanks to the China RTX 4090 export restrictions. If you don't already have a 4090, you're probably best off giving it a pass now.

The RTX 4090 creates a larger gap between itself and the next closest Nvidia GPU. Across our suite of gaming benchmarks, it's 37% faster overall than the RTX 4080 at 4K, and 33% faster than the RTX 4080 Super. It's also 51% faster than AMD's top performing RX 7900 XTX — though it also costs nearly twice as much online right now.

Let's be clear about something: You really need a high refresh rate 4K monitor to get the most out of the RTX 4090. At 1440p its advantage over a 4080 shrinks to 24%, and it's only 15% at 1080p — and that includes some demanding DXR games. The lead over the RX 7900 XTX also falls to only 32% at 1080p. Not only do you need a high resolution, high refresh rate monitor, but you'll also want the fastest CPU possible to get the most out of the 4090.

It's not just gaming performance, either. In