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Join Tom's Hardware For An AMA With Asus, March 25

Tom's Hardware will be hosting an Ask Me Anything session with representatives from Asus on Wednesday, March 25 from 12:00 pm EDT. The AMA will be open for a full 24 hours, leaving you plenty of time to ask our guests about their wide array of products. The AMA will be moderated and supervised by Tom's Senior Community Manager, Joe Pishgar, as well as a full team of Senior Moderators.

What: Ask Me Anything – Asus

When: Wednesday, March 25, 12:00 pm EST

Where: The Components Category of Tom's Hardware Forum www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2576707/official-asus-representatives.html

Who:

Erik Joiner, Consumer Marketing Manager (erik-asus)

Rajinder "Raja" Gill, Senior Technical Marketing Specialist – Component Group (Raja@Asus)

Juan J. "JJ" Guerrero, Senior Technical Marketing Specialist & Community Manager

Ask Me Anything Rules

• No tech support questions, as these require in-depth personal follow-up and diagnostics.• All Rules of Conduct apply.• Keep questions direct and to the point.• Avoid opinion bias, i.e., "Why are all your products awesome/horrible?"• Be respectful of our guests, no insults, no leading questions.• Do not post duplicate questions, or repost your question multiple times.• Not all questions may be answered. Questions may not be answered in the order in which they are received or posted.

Only registered users will be able to ask questions, so if you haven't yet, be sure to register now for your chance to participate. The official representatives will reply periodically over the time the AMA is active, using a recognized and verified account. Please join us on this date to throw your questions into the mix and ask Asus what you've always wanted to ask!

And look, friends. Don't post your questions here in the article comments. They will fall on deaf ears. Go to the actual AMA thread when it's open, which is right here: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2576707/official-asus-representatives.html

Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • turkey3_scratch
    Cool I love these things.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    Cool! I want to ask them how they figured out their OC socket.

    My I write a suggestion: Make a list of questions you want to ask them during the next 5 days so you don't forget. :)
    Reply
  • hst101rox
    Why not socketed CPUs on the gaming laptops? I want an extreme CPU in an extreme laptop! Same question goes to you, MSI.
    Reply
  • clonazepam
    Why not socketed CPUs on the gaming laptops? I want an extreme CPU in an extreme laptop! Same question goes to you, MSI.

    Well I'm not into gaming laptops, but I imagine the guy or gal that doesn't want to pay for the extreme CPU also doesn't want to pay for the extreme engineering to accommodate the CPU that they don't want. :P
    Reply
  • hst101rox
    It is very helpful to have an extreme CPU as an option down the road to upgrade the laptop when the CPU gets cheap. These laptops can handle the heat of an extreme CPU, so that's not the issue. Other than that it's CPU support by the UEFI. Throttlestop really opens up their potential. Intel I think is pressuring these companies to only have soldered CPUs in their laptops, which sucks.

    It's not for weight savings, Asus gaming laptops are very thick and heavy yet have a soldered CPU.
    Reply
  • James Mason
    It is very helpful to have an extreme CPU as an option down the road to upgrade the laptop when the CPU gets cheap. These laptops can handle the heat of an extreme CPU, so that's not the issue. Other than that it's CPU support by the UEFI. Throttlestop really opens up their potential. Intel I think is pressuring these companies to only have soldered CPUs in their laptops, which sucks.

    It's not for weight savings, Asus gaming laptops are very thick and heavy yet have a soldered CPU.

    It might be because of all the movement that laptops undertake. a "non secured" CPU might get damaged by all the bumps and bruises that laptops take on a daily basis compared to desktop.
    Reply
  • amk-aka-Phantom
    Why not socketed CPUs on the gaming laptops? I want an extreme CPU in an extreme laptop! Same question goes to you, MSI!

    On NotebookReview, I read that this is a deliberate move by Intel. MQ (removable) CPUs are now only provided for models that were originally designed around them. HQ (soldered) is forced on everything else. Look at MSI GT80 Titan. Both GPUs are removable. CPU? Soldered. I really do only see MQ chips in laptops that are just refreshes of laptops that originally came out with MQs (e.g. Lenovo W541 which is a refresh of W540). I am starting to believe this theory.

    NBR enthusiasts also state that increasing and even holding stock Turbo on HQs is a pain compared to MQs and that they "don't obey" the increased TDP limit you set, but in my experience (Asus N550, i7-4700HQ) I cannot prove that particular claim, increased Turbo just fine (3.4 GHz for all cores) and it holds for a long time.

    Better ask Asus why the G series are so much of a PITA to take apart. Half a year since I helped my friend clean his G750JX and already it needs cleaning again, can barely hit 3 GHz on multicore Turbo, and one needs to take apart EVERYTHING to just dust the fans... MSI laptops are just fine in this regard, somehow, take of bottom, good to go.

    It might be because of all the movement that laptops undertake. a "non secured" CPU might get damaged by all the bumps and bruises that laptops take on a daily basis compared to desktop.

    Nonsense, there are plenty of laptops with socketed CPUs and no movement will damage a properly seated and secured CPU.
    ----

    Also ask Asus why they are still trying to push cheaper N and G series with TN 768p screens that no one really wants... and often refuses to ship good configs to some countries despite A LOT of people there interested in them.
    Reply
  • roger smith
    mini itx / micro atx x99 boards?
    Reply
  • hst101rox
    15534862 said:
    Why not socketed CPUs on the gaming laptops? I want an extreme CPU in an extreme laptop! Same question goes to you, MSI!

    On NotebookReview, I read that this is a deliberate move by Intel. MQ (removable) CPUs are now only provided for models that were originally designed around them. HQ (soldered) is forced on everything else. Look at MSI GT80 Titan. Both GPUs are removable. CPU? Soldered. I really do only see MQ chips in laptops that are just refreshes of laptops that originally came out with MQs (e.g. Lenovo W541 which is a refresh of W540). I am starting to believe this theory.

    NBR enthusiasts also state that increasing and even holding stock Turbo on HQs is a pain compared to MQs and that they "don't obey" the increased TDP limit you set, but in my experience (Asus N550, i7-4700HQ) I cannot prove that particular claim, increased Turbo just fine (3.4 GHz for all cores) and it holds for a long time.

    Better ask Asus why the G series are so much of a PITA to take apart. Half a year since I helped my friend clean his G750JX and already it needs cleaning again, can barely hit 3 GHz on multicore Turbo, and one needs to take apart EVERYTHING to just dust the fans... MSI laptops are just fine in this regard, somehow, take of bottom, good to go.

    It might be because of all the movement that laptops undertake. a "non secured" CPU might get damaged by all the bumps and bruises that laptops take on a daily basis compared to desktop.

    Nonsense, there are plenty of laptops with socketed CPUs and no movement will damage a properly seated and secured CPU.
    ----

    Also ask Asus why they are still trying to push cheaper N and G series with TN 768p screens that no one really wants... and often refuses to ship good configs to some countries despite A LOT of people there interested in them.

    Nice post. Yes you are right, even Alienware's new laptops don't have a soldered CPU so you can't put in an extreme CPU and overclock it very much (besides TDP limits I suppose), and they tried getting away with using a 180w AC adapter like MSI tried and use the battery to make up the difference.
    The MSI GT80's soldered CPU is kind of glaring with that model since it is marketed towards upgradability (and mechanical KB).

    Asus did make some laptops that were easy to work on, the G50VT, G51VX, G51J laptop chassis.

    I also doubt that socketed CPUs are sensitive to drops, though Panasonic Toughbook fully rugged laptops looks like they use soldered CPUs for their i5/i7. Maybe for their core 2 duo laptops and pentium 3 too.
    Reply
  • de5_Roy
    looking forward to the a.m.a.

    is it possible to track the a.m.a. thread before it opens?
    Reply