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Microsoft Didn't Have Time to Add Notifications to WP8

By - Source: The Verge | B 38 comments

Only way to deliver notifications on mobile platform is through an app that uses Live Tiles.

Microsoft has admitted that the lack of a central hub for notifications in Windows Phone 8 is due to the developers running out of time to integrate the feature.

During the Microsoft BUILD event, where the firm announced Windows 8 has sold over four million units, Thomas Fennel admitted the reason behind the lack of a notification center in WP8: "It's very, very important to me… we get tons of feedback from developers that they want something like that as well. I promise we're thinking very, very hard on that one."

Although Microsoft's platform does deliver notifications through its Live Tiles system, notifications for users can't be seen in a central hub. A notification center can also assist users in tracking older notifications that may be lost.

For applications that don't utilize Live Tiles, developers are left without a method of sending its users important notifications.

Microsoft is likely to incorporate the feature in a future build of the just-released Windows Phone 8.


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  • 23 Hide
    aftcomet , November 3, 2012 7:08 PM
    Weak.
  • 23 Hide
    halcyon , November 3, 2012 7:11 PM
    Service Pack 1
  • 20 Hide
    jhansonxi , November 3, 2012 7:52 PM
    A rush job but a common problem when developing products with a mandatory ship date (like the year-end holidays).
Other Comments
  • 23 Hide
    aftcomet , November 3, 2012 7:08 PM
    Weak.
  • 23 Hide
    halcyon , November 3, 2012 7:11 PM
    Service Pack 1
  • -3 Hide
    DroKing , November 3, 2012 7:47 PM
    Thats very weak. I 2nd aftcomet. You disappoint me msft. Ill just wait till WP8 get better then I just might be tickled for a first smartphone ever.
  • 11 Hide
    manwell999 , November 3, 2012 7:50 PM
    WP8 users didn't get the notification not to buy WP8
  • 20 Hide
    jhansonxi , November 3, 2012 7:52 PM
    A rush job but a common problem when developing products with a mandatory ship date (like the year-end holidays).
  • 6 Hide
    assasin32 , November 3, 2012 7:52 PM
    I'd rather like it when companies release something late and with the product fully completed and done. Rather than have to wait for them to patch it up, if they ever get around to it after release.

    And to get a response from them saying "There are delays and we will release X product when it is done and up to our standards" it shows that they won't push a POS product on us and only release something worthy to me.
  • 4 Hide
    coder543 , November 3, 2012 8:01 PM
    assasin32I'd rather like it when companies release something late and with the product fully completed and done. Rather than have to wait for them to patch it up, if they ever get around to it after release. And to get a response from them saying "There are delays and we will release X product when it is done and up to our standards" it shows that they won't push a POS product on us and only release something worthy to me.


    This is Microsoft.
  • 0 Hide
    halcyon , November 3, 2012 8:06 PM
    I've been using Win8 in a VM. Its just frustrating. I guess I need to be patient and wonder why they didn't try to make it intuitive to navigate the UI changes.
  • 0 Hide
    ddpruitt , November 3, 2012 8:31 PM
    Me thinks that there is something else afoot. I doubt they would leave something like this out because they're pressed for time. Something like a central notification hub is trivial to implement (day or so work for one guy). I think they have other concerns here they are trying to work around (like getting sued by Apple or having their device blocked by a court).
  • 10 Hide
    damianrobertjones , November 3, 2012 8:32 PM
    To the people that keep saying 'weak'... I bet you didn't even notice or know that the feature wasn't going to be included.

    P.s. This is a WP8 article not W8.
  • 0 Hide
    hannibal , November 3, 2012 8:52 PM
    damianrobertjonesTo the people that keep saying 'weak'... I bet you didn't even notice or know that the feature wasn't going to be included. P.s. This is a WP8 article not W8.


    Indeed, and this is important to corporates who wants to keep their workphones in tight leach! Not so many person in home controls the programs and usage of their phones via administrator tools ;-)
    This is allso a feature that makes windows phones so much different than all other osses. You can use same tools to manage you desktops, laptops, pads and phones, or yo should after those updates comes around.
  • 7 Hide
    halcyon , November 3, 2012 9:06 PM
    TheCapuletSeriously, that excuse isn't valid any more. It took me all of about 30 seconds to learn how to navigate metro. After using it for just two weeks, I already find it more intuitive than anything MS has done before in the UI space.If you can't figure something this simple out, personal computing isn't for you.Seriously, if you're going to pick something to bitch about for W8, there are a ton of actually legitimate reasons to go for.

    Um no. Its not that I can't learn the new UI...its that I shouldn't have to. I shouldn't be looking for how to shut the machine down. ...how to close the Reader. Its 2012, not 1990, the OS should be intuitive...and its not.
  • 3 Hide
    Anonymous , November 3, 2012 9:16 PM
    The part of Windows that Microsoft wants us to see (Metro) is a version 1 product. The fact that there is a big fat update to plow through before you can get started is a testament to Microsoft's desire to make this work, and an indication of the incompleteness of the initial release.

    This is a big, hairy deal for Microsoft. They better get it right, eventually.
  • 2 Hide
    halcyon , November 3, 2012 9:25 PM
    halcyonUm no. Its not that I can't learn the new UI...its that I shouldn't have to. I shouldn't be looking for how to shut the machine down. ...how to close the Reader. Its 2012, not 1990, the OS should be intuitive...and its not.

    Let me put it a different way. What is motivation for me, with a non-touchsreen machine, to go out and pay for Windows 8 when I have Windows 7 given that Windows 8 is not easier to use? Does it add some ground-breaking feature that I overlooked?
  • 1 Hide
    nebun , November 3, 2012 9:36 PM
    how do you run out of time????don't these so called developers sleep, eat and spend their family time at work?.....it's called rushing out the software and let the public test it....
  • -1 Hide
    bison88 , November 3, 2012 9:43 PM
    nebunhow do you run out of time????don't these so called developers sleep, eat and spend their family time at work?.....it's called rushing out the software and let the public test it....



    Yeah, I'm sure it's all about rushing a product out to make $$$ and has nothing to do with time lines :rolleyes:. Android was all sorts of F#@%'ed up when it was released, for quite a few versions it was pretty crappy compared to the standard Apple had already made available. Some new features, yeah, but many customary features were missing. Give 'em a break. This is M$'s first real attempt at capturing the Smart Phone/Touch Phone market and not doing this half-in, half-out thing as before.
  • 0 Hide
    kyuuketsuki , November 3, 2012 9:59 PM
    halcyonUm no. Its not that I can't learn the new UI...its that I shouldn't have to. I shouldn't be looking for how to shut the machine down. ...how to close the Reader. Its 2012, not 1990, the OS should be intuitive...and its not.
    Uh, bulls***? There's supposed to be zero learning curve for a totally different UI? What are you smoking?

    It's fine if you don't like the Metro/Modern UI. That's why there's still a desktop (plus backwards compatibility of course). But complaining about a small learning curve is ridiculous.
  • 6 Hide
    bystander , November 3, 2012 10:16 PM
    halcyonLet me put it a different way. What is motivation for me, with a non-touchsreen machine, to go out and pay for Windows 8 when I have Windows 7 given that Windows 8 is not easier to use? Does it add some ground-breaking feature that I overlooked?

    You do realize this thread is about WP8, as in Windows Phone 8. There may be no reason to move to Windows 8 yet, and you probably shouldn't, but if you ever start using a Windows tablet or phone, you may actually find it very convenient that all the OS's act the same.
  • 3 Hide
    markusmcnugen , November 3, 2012 10:24 PM
    halcyonUm no. Its not that I can't learn the new UI...its that I shouldn't have to. I shouldn't be looking for how to shut the machine down. ...how to close the Reader. Its 2012, not 1990, the OS should be intuitive...and its not.


    I think your mistaking the word intuitive with telepathic. Im just going to assume that you have not and will never try OS/X or any Linux Distros because they arent exactly the way Windows is. It takes like 2 minutes to learn the Modern UI. If you dont like it that's fine, but its not difficult to figure out by any means. Well, that you barely even need Modern UI with all the keyboard shortcuts.
  • 1 Hide
    halcyon , November 3, 2012 10:31 PM
    KyuuketsukiUh, bulls***? There's supposed to be zero learning curve for a totally different UI? What are you smoking?It's fine if you don't like the Metro/Modern UI. That's why there's still a desktop (plus backwards compatibility of course). But complaining about a small learning curve is ridiculous.

    Of course there's a learning curve...but for what benefit
    Give us 5 compelling reasons a non-touch-screen having user should pay $40 to switch to Windows 8 on their desktops.
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