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EU Warns Cloud Customers of Data Surveillance by U.S.

By - Source: Euopean Parliament | B 22 comments

The European Parliament published a new study prepared by the Centre D'Etudes Sur Les Conflits and the Centre for European Policy Studies that raises concerns of cloud data surveillance.

The European Parliament published a new study prepared by the Centre D'Etudes Sur Les Conflits and the Centre for European Policy Studies that raises concerns of cloud data surveillance. Titled "Fighting cyber crime and protecting privacy in the cloud", the document pays special attention the current legal framework of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), which grants U.S. authorities the right to monitor the data of non-U.S. residents and organizations.

In its recommendation, the document authors write that the European Parliament should consider "amending the [data protection] Regulation to require prominent warnings to individual data subjects" and that "no data subject should be left unaware if sensitive data about them is exposed to a 3rd country's surveillance apparatus."

"The EU should open new negotiations with the US for recognition of a human right to privacy which grants Europeans equal protections in US courts," the document concludes.

Slate recently quoted William Kennard, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, stating that fears of mass surveillance are unwarranted. According to Kennard, all law enforcement and national security investigations require legal and judicial permission, which FISA, however, explicitly circumvents for non-Americans.

As long as FISA remains unchanged, there is little that the U.S. government can do to alleviate any fears that data will be monitored.

 

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  • 26 Hide
    soundping , January 13, 2013 3:55 AM
    Everybody's guilty until proven less guilty.
  • 16 Hide
    Yuka , January 13, 2013 3:16 AM
    Why is this a surprise?

    I mean, really... With a warrant they have access to pretty much everything on a server from a 3rd party company. Thing is, we're supposed to trust that, information in their hands is being used for the 'greater good'.

    Cheers!
  • 10 Hide
    A Bad Day , January 13, 2013 4:25 AM
    soundpingEverybody's guilty until proven less guilty.


    In the name of security of freedom!

    (sometimes makes sense, if you don't think or ask)
Other Comments
  • 16 Hide
    Yuka , January 13, 2013 3:16 AM
    Why is this a surprise?

    I mean, really... With a warrant they have access to pretty much everything on a server from a 3rd party company. Thing is, we're supposed to trust that, information in their hands is being used for the 'greater good'.

    Cheers!
  • 26 Hide
    soundping , January 13, 2013 3:55 AM
    Everybody's guilty until proven less guilty.
  • 4 Hide
    abbadon_34 , January 13, 2013 4:06 AM
    well DUH ...
  • 10 Hide
    A Bad Day , January 13, 2013 4:25 AM
    soundpingEverybody's guilty until proven less guilty.


    In the name of security of freedom!

    (sometimes makes sense, if you don't think or ask)
  • 9 Hide
    JAYDEEJOHN , January 13, 2013 6:22 AM
    We must have way too much liberty.
    We need to start giving it away quickly before it grows
  • 7 Hide
    BriboCN , January 13, 2013 6:48 AM
    At this point if you don't encrypt something expect that others can see it. It really does not matter where you are and what you do. Being able to encrypt data is so easy these days why they would not base a cloud infrastructure around it is beyond me.
  • 8 Hide
    thecolorblue , January 13, 2013 11:10 AM
    BriboCNAt this point if you don't encrypt something expect that others can see it. It really does not matter where you are and what you do. Being able to encrypt data is so easy these days why they would not base a cloud infrastructure around it is beyond me.

    the cloud is about mining your data - that is its corporate purpose
  • 3 Hide
    stuart72 , January 13, 2013 11:28 AM
    YukaWhy is this a surprise?I mean, really... With a warrant they have access to pretty much everything on a server from a 3rd party company. Thing is, we're supposed to trust that, information in their hands is being used for the 'greater good'.Cheers!


    I think the point the EU is raising is that they don't need a warrant for non-US citizens which 'FISA.. explicitly circumvents for non-Americans.'
  • 3 Hide
    npcomplete , January 13, 2013 11:56 AM
    I agree about clients using their own encryption, but that is an extra step that has to be done and removes certain features. A few services (very few) do offer end-to-end encryption where they do _not_ maintain your private key. I think Kim Dotcom's upcoming Mega service would be a good choice, since there's now an incentive for him to limit his liability as well
  • 0 Hide
    Shin-san , January 13, 2013 1:44 PM
    You are using someone else's servers, so yeah, that's always something to consider even with the top cloud providers. On the other side, if you are serving stuff that's considered public information anyways, then the cloud is fine
  • 5 Hide
    d_kuhn , January 13, 2013 3:23 PM
    Just assume that every single bit of data you put on the net is being monitored, possibly by more than one entity... and you'll be MUCH closer to reality than assuming you can keep it private.
  • 4 Hide
    11796pcs , January 13, 2013 3:35 PM
    And this is why I run my own FTP server out of my home. As much space as you can afford in hard drives and complete privacy. Do people seriously think the data on their cloud accounts is private? If we've learned anything over time it's that anything on someone else's servers is not private.
  • 0 Hide
    cinergy , January 13, 2013 5:28 PM
    11796pcsAnd this is why I run my own FTP server out of my home. As much space as you can afford in hard drives and complete privacy. Do people seriously think the data on their cloud accounts is private? If we've learned anything over time it's that anything on someone else's servers is not private.


    Yes, people and I included expect that my data is private and secure e.g. in Microsoft Cloud.
  • 0 Hide
    10tacle , January 13, 2013 6:27 PM
    Never have liked the idea of remote online accessible storage, even when Dell gave me "free" 8GB worth for my last laptop purchase. Never even signed up for it out of principle, let alone the useless space (I have two 64GB thumb drives on my key chain at all times, thanks). Now I can understand why some people would feel better about backing up their data remotely in the event of a fire, theft, loss, or corrupted hard drive.

    However, if you are competent and take the steps necessary to store your data securely (backup Blu-Ray burned discs placed in a home fire-proof safe or bank safe deposit box for example), there is no reason to look to somewhere else to store your information and trust them to do so securely.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , January 13, 2013 9:56 PM
    Very few actually seem to care about the fact that much of what they share electronically may be monitored. For those that DO actually care, there are several options, many of which are free. Just Google "private secure encrypted" and you will get a list.
  • -1 Hide
    plattyaj , January 13, 2013 10:49 PM
    Since there is no way of knowing someone's nationality from an online identity we can conclude that either everyone is safe (they wouldn't want to accidentally get a US citizen) or nobody is. 100-1 it's the latter, nobody is safe.
  • 1 Hide
    susyque747 , January 14, 2013 9:25 AM
    Been saying this for the last couple years, don't trust the cloud and more importantly, don't trust the government.
  • 1 Hide
    Someone Somewhere , January 14, 2013 11:04 AM
    plattyajSince there is no way of knowing someone's nationality from an online identity we can conclude that either everyone is safe (they wouldn't want to accidentally get a US citizen) or nobody is. 100-1 it's the latter, nobody is safe.


    Ever heard of mapping IP addresses to countries (and ISPs)?
  • -1 Hide
    plattyaj , January 14, 2013 11:29 AM
    Someone SomewhereEver heard of mapping IP addresses to countries (and ISPs)?

    Yes, I also know many US citizens who live in foreign countries and plenty of non-US citizens who live in the US. I was one of those until a few years ago ...
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