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Intel Chats With DARPA: Innovation Trumps IP Lawsuits

By - Source: Intel | B 20 comments

Intel has been one of the most DARPA-critical entities among all large tech companies in the U.S.

Former Intel CTO Pat Gelsinger, now CEO of VMWare, heavily criticized the massive funds that have been made available to DARPA for military spending purposes, while science and math did not receive the necessary education resources to help the U.S. remain competitive with countries such as China.

So it may be somewhat surprising that a writer for Intel's own technology blog, Free Press, had an opportunity to interview DARPA Director Dan Kaufman, and the questions only scratched the surface and were as cautious as the answers that were given. However, Kaufman was outspoken about the current IP protection trend that is raising more and more concern whether IP lawsuits are serving their purpose or not. Kaufman's full answer on the role of IP Law:

"If you create a great product, you’re going to be out in front of people and you’re going to do just fine. There’s nothing wrong with companies wanting patents and to be protected, but I think that if the majority of your efforts are focused on [protecting IP], it’s almost the beginning of the decay of your company. You need to focus your bright brains on making the next incredible product. The idea is, go make cool stuff and lawyers can do the lawyer thing."

Intel also asked him about which country has the edge in scientific research, which could have been a clever setup for a discussion how the education and scientific research environments in the U.S. compare with the rest of the world, one of Intel's big concerns. Kaufman's answer was an example of diplomacy:

"No country has a monopoly on great ideas or great people. One of the things we’ve worked at really hard inside DARPA is opening things up — moving most research projects from classified to unclassified. We try to bring in people from different groups, ethnicities and sexes. There is scientific evidence that shows over and over again that diversity yields benefits. To me, that goes for anywhere in the world. Technology is more ubiquitous, countries are coming online and getting more tools and more power, and some people are worried about America’s dominance being threatened. I don’t view it that way. I view technology as a gift to the world. Scientists of a certain age talk about Sputnik or seeing the Moon launch. We need that age of wonder again. What sparks technology is not showing STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) scores. It’s not about beating this country or that country. What we need is a sense of wonder, like when you look at something and think, “Oh my, this is amazing and I want to be a part of it.” That’s our job at DARPA."

 

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Top Comments
  • 11 Hide
    amdwilliam1985 , August 1, 2012 2:17 PM
    Someone please send this article to Apple inc. and Tim Crook.
  • 10 Hide
    Crush3d , August 1, 2012 4:51 PM
    memadmaxSo, in short, I think everything that could be invented has been invented, and the only thing that can be done is to improve what we have already(which we do).


    Really. Lol.
Other Comments
  • 11 Hide
    amdwilliam1985 , August 1, 2012 2:17 PM
    Someone please send this article to Apple inc. and Tim Crook.
  • Display all 20 comments.
  • 4 Hide
    jabliese , August 1, 2012 2:43 PM
    Ummm, the Moon landing was all about beating another country, Mr. Kaufman.
  • 4 Hide
    rebel1280 , August 1, 2012 3:00 PM
    jablieseUmmm, the Moon landing was all about beating another country, Mr. Kaufman.

    Still amazing and would have loved/ would love to be part of it (if the US ever decides to do it again :(  )
  • 7 Hide
    Anonymous , August 1, 2012 4:04 PM
    @memadmax: What did Edison *invent* again?
  • 2 Hide
    tacobravo , August 1, 2012 4:27 PM
    Apple *cough* Apple
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , August 1, 2012 4:27 PM
    Yes Intel! you must improve Your HD graphics Driver support for the GPUs you sell, Stop letting Laptop OEM's customize your Intel HD grapics drivers! Start writing better dirver software to go with your GPU's! It's high time you spend some of those chipzilla bucks on software and stop the OEM's from screwing the public with little or no HD graphcs driver Updates/support for YOUR GPU hardware!
  • 3 Hide
    A Bad Day , August 1, 2012 4:42 PM
    Quote:
    What sparks technology is not showing STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) scores.


    A many politicians would like to disagree. Standardized test scores are the only way to go, according to them.
  • 10 Hide
    Crush3d , August 1, 2012 4:51 PM
    memadmaxSo, in short, I think everything that could be invented has been invented, and the only thing that can be done is to improve what we have already(which we do).


    Really. Lol.
  • 1 Hide
    theconsolegamer , August 1, 2012 5:26 PM
    ghost__@memadmax: What did Edison *invent* again?

    He invented the American humor.... If you know what I mean.
  • 5 Hide
    festerovic , August 1, 2012 5:26 PM
    memadmaxIf you ask me, I think we are past the peak of innovation.There used to be a time when a single man could invent something and it would be his, he would then start a company around his patents and die a millionaire... Take Thomas Edison for example.But now, all the easy stuff has pretty much been discovered. Now it takes teams of engineers/scientists, even multiple teams of people to create something new now a days.So, in short, I think everything that could be invented has been invented, and the only thing that can be done is to improve what we have already(which we do).The exception is space technology. If we can discover/create/whatever faster than light space travel(Einstein is laughing at me right now), then we will open up a whole new era of "wonder" as this DARPA guy talks about....


    I needed a good LOL.
  • 2 Hide
    Khimera2000 , August 1, 2012 5:43 PM
    Odd that they complain about DARPA's budget and education in regards to competitive edge. The last time I checked the Internet, advance prosthetics, and the blooming drone markets, apples Siri where all do to various efforts by DARPA. Lets not also forget the technology there pushing NOW, AKA 3D manufactured microchips, which have already proven to be extremely promising in lab studies.

    The DARPA challenge is a great example of how they drive research and innovation.

    I always thought of DARPA as one of the most important organizations in the united states. They research technology that would be to risky for companies and schools to take on, or technology that's not currently needed but will be. Once these technologies reach a point of maturity they get other companies and institutes involved who need the tech.

    Examples of how DARPA moves Tech are the US UAVs and SIRI. The former started all in house at DARPA, and later on was adopted by the air force. the later was developed in house once again, but acquired by Apple later on, the Siri voice didn't even change when apple nabbed the stuff.

    In my mind DARPA drives Educational and Commercial institutions to the absolute edge of technological capability, for us to keep our competitive edge we would need to increase spending in both DARPA and education. Lets not forget that they don't just research Weapons, they research near anything that might be needed in the future.
  • 0 Hide
    deksman , August 1, 2012 7:00 PM
    memadmaxIf you ask me, I think we are past the peak of innovation.There used to be a time when a single man could invent something and it would be his, he would then start a company around his patents and die a millionaire... Take Thomas Edison for example.But now, all the easy stuff has pretty much been discovered. Now it takes teams of engineers/scientists, even multiple teams of people to create something new now a days.So, in short, I think everything that could be invented has been invented, and the only thing that can be done is to improve what we have already(which we do).The exception is space technology. If we can discover/create/whatever faster than light space travel(Einstein is laughing at me right now), then we will open up a whole new era of "wonder" as this DARPA guy talks about....


    Not even close.
    For one thing, humanity is not even using up to date technology.
    We are still using outdated materials in computers even though we could have used for example synthetic diamonds since 1997 in electronics (at least partly), and graphene since 2005.

    We still use fossil fuels for the love of man, even though we had viable alternatives 90 years ago which we could have switched over in a decade (geothermal and wind).

    In capitalism, you go where the money is.
    There is NEVER enough money to go around. But, there is more than enough resources.
    Money is an obstacle.
    We need raw materials and various resources to construct equipment needed for further research and using the most advanced technology available, in the most technologically efficient manner possible (this simply isn't done... because if it did, planned obsolescence wouldn't exist - instead, we would design computers with advanced materials, durability, upgrade-ability, and easy recycling - but 'cost effectiveness' ultimately prohibits it, because a company is in this to gain profits while spending as little money as possible).

    This kind of practice is slowing us down... money should be done away with for good and instead of assigning value to everything and 'cost', we ask do we have the resources/technology to make something happen.
    The answer is ALWAYS, YES.
    Cooperation should be adhered to instead of competition (because the latter produces worse results).

    And if you think people wouldn't work for free - guess again.
    Open source is increasing in quantity... millions around the globe are donating their free time to volunteer while receiving 0 compensation.

    We don't need money - we need resources - and those we have in abundance, and we have the know-how to create resources in abundance using technology.

    Capitalism merely wastes and doesn't do anything efficiently... if it did, we would be seeing technology roughly 100 years ahead of what we are using now in circulation (and not the garbage we use now).
  • 0 Hide
    dalethepcman , August 1, 2012 7:06 PM
    The next technology I see doing this will be intelligent humanoid form machines a-la I-Robot (heck it might even be called iRobot if apple has anything to say about it.) Sold to the public as personal servants to make life easy. Modified for the military to subvert other societies, turned against all humanity by a group of hackers.
  • -1 Hide
    deksman , August 1, 2012 8:49 PM
    We already had the technology for decades to fully automate majority of the global workforce... today we can easily automate close to 90% of global jobs.
    The only reason we are still not there is because of fictional 'costs' involved.
    But ultimately as those artificial costs go down, companies will be unable to justify keeping human labor in employment - because machines need no rest, they work 24/7, require no sick leave, no pension plans, etc.
    We are already at a point where production is sky high, and purchasing power is low... its only a matter of time before it accelerates to the point where purchasing power hits rock bottom - which is when the economy collapses.

    And no one is 'irreplaceable'
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , August 1, 2012 10:05 PM
    So the company with the worlds most crooked monopoly who engages in the most criminal activity to stifle any other companies attempts to compete and make it not-a-monopoly-anymore, including abusing the patent system, doesn't think there's anything wrong with said patent system? Shocking I tell you...
  • 0 Hide
    hetneo , August 1, 2012 10:52 PM
    memadmaxIf you ask me, I think we are past the peak of innovation.There used to be a time when a single man could invent something and it would be his, he would then start a company around his patents and die a millionaire... Take Thomas Edison for example.But now, all the easy stuff has pretty much been discovered. Now it takes teams of engineers/scientists, even multiple teams of people to create something new now a days.So, in short, I think everything that could be invented has been invented, and the only thing that can be done is to improve what we have already(which we do).The exception is space technology. If we can discover/create/whatever faster than light space travel(Einstein is laughing at me right now), then we will open up a whole new era of "wonder" as this DARPA guy talks about....

    Edison invented and patented business practice Apple is using at the moment.
  • -1 Hide
    deksman , August 1, 2012 11:10 PM
    The only reason Edison received recognition in the first place was because his 'invention' was economically viable.
    Tesla on the other hand was light years ahead of Edison in numerous areas, and demonstrated a working wifi energy transfer 116 years ago (among other things).
    Tesla died in poverty to my recollection (precisely because he wanted to give the world free energy).
    Other than that, most of his advanced technology was patented and never released/used - except certain aspects of it were used to augment existing systems of the times.

    So pathetic.
    All that advanced technology a century ago... and WE are barely starting to dabble in it (Capitalism at its finest).

  • 0 Hide
    hawkwindeb , August 2, 2012 12:29 AM
    memadmaxIf you ask me, I think we are past the peak of innovation.There used to be a time when a single man could invent something and it would be his, he would then start a company around his patents and die a millionaire... Take Thomas Edison for example.But now, all the easy stuff has pretty much been discovered. Now it takes teams of engineers/scientists, even multiple teams of people to create something new now a days.So, in short, I think everything that could be invented has been invented, and the only thing that can be done is to improve what we have already(which we do).The exception is space technology. If we can discover/create/whatever faster than light space travel(Einstein is laughing at me right now), then we will open up a whole new era of "wonder" as this DARPA guy talks about....


    That way of thinking went out back in 1902! Dude maybe you're being sarcastic by almost quoting the thoughts of the Charles Holland Duell, commissioner of the United States Patent and Trademark Office - at least I hope so for your sake!

    You might want to educate yourself and digest a little history. Try searching "Charles Holland Duell" at Wikipedia.

    Interesting details on who said what. The corrected statements can be said of any era including today, until someone invents that next really big thing that truly changes our lives. There will always be a few really big changing inventions among a larger quantity of smaller inventions or inventions that piggy back on other/older inventions. ie: how many ways are their to use man-made/man-manipulated electricity (AC and/or DC) Maybe someone asked Thomas Edison before he started work on his light bulb, why would someone want electricity in their house, what would they use it for since nothing in people's houses could use it?

    Innovation and inventions will continue forever. There's no end to the human imagination.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , August 2, 2012 9:41 AM
    Dan Kaufman is not DARPA Director....he is Director of one of its offices (I2O)