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Microsoft Bolsters Xbox One TV Capabilities With Hauppauge Digital Tuner

The battle for the single living room entertainment system continues, as both PC and console makers are trying to cram more features in a single box that will essentially replace multiple living room systems. Microsoft recently added another weapon in its Xbox One live TV arsenal with a digital tuner from Hauppauge, giving users an over-the-air option for live TV.

With the digital tuner, players can pause up to 30 minutes of live television, use the console's Snap feature to watch a TV show while playing a game, and even change channels with your voice through Kinect. Live TV can also be streamed to other Windows 10 devices at home through the Xbox or Xbox One Smartglass apps.

The digital tuner will cost you $59.99. However, an antenna is required alongside the device, so Microsoft is offering a bundle that includes a Mohu Leaf 50 antenna in the Microsoft store for $99.99.

Mohu also has three other options for antennas that gather between 63-67 channels in the area. Users can type in their address on Mohu's site to get an idea of which channels are received with each antenna.

The addition of the Hauppauge digital tuner is further proof that Microsoft continues to see the Xbox One as more than just a game console. Since its initial announcement at E3, it has been touting the console as the best living room system. Not only can you use it to play games, but you can watch movies through the Blu-ray player, stream shows through Hulu and Netflix, and watch live TV through apps or an HDMI input.

Even if the digital tuner isn't the most popular route to use for watching live TV, it at least shows that the Xbox One has a variety of TV capabilities to serve virtually any living room scenario.

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  • gggplaya
    Only for cord cutters. If they made a deal with dishnetwork, directv and cable(comcast), then they would have a complete home entertainment box.
    Reply
  • burkhartmj
    Until they add cableCARD support somehow and get some legitimate DVR capabilities this will be barely a shadow of what Windows Media Center was. Antennas are largely useless at least in the US, I've had many and never manage to get more than a few channels, all of which cut out constantly.
    Reply
  • ubercake
    Xbox one also has guide services through the box for various cable providers. Xbox needs to offer DVR capability for OTA and OTA guide services to really compete with other OTA offerings (e.g. TabloTV).
    Reply
  • voodoochicken
    Until they add cableCARD support somehow and get some legitimate DVR capabilities this will be barely a shadow of what Windows Media Center was. Antennas are largely useless at least in the US, I've had many and never manage to get more than a few channels, all of which cut out constantly.

    Depends on where you live. I've mostly been in the suburbs of Dallas, at least since the switch to digital, and while I've occasionally had wonky signals, or cross signals, for the most part my experience has been positive. The only time I really struggled was pulling SD alt channels like THiS or cozi. But still good enough compared to the signal we had in '70s
    Reply
  • Christopher1
    Until they add cableCARD support somehow and get some legitimate DVR capabilities this will be barely a shadow of what Windows Media Center was. Antennas are largely useless at least in the US, I've had many and never manage to get more than a few channels, all of which cut out constantly.
    Get a better antenna. I know many people in URBAN areas who use antennas and can get broadcast channels just fine using an antenna.
    Reply
  • gggplaya
    15896276 said:
    Until they add cableCARD support somehow and get some legitimate DVR capabilities this will be barely a shadow of what Windows Media Center was. Antennas are largely useless at least in the US, I've had many and never manage to get more than a few channels, all of which cut out constantly.

    Only use an omnidirectional antenna if you're in an urban city. Otherwise buy a large directional antenna and place it up high. I have one mounted to the floor of my attic and i pick up FOX, CBS, NBC, ABC, the CW and PBS just fine. All in gorgeous HD and rarely stutters or breaks out.

    I use a program called TV Antenna Helper free on my android. It uses my GPS location and locates all the nearest tv stations. It tells you which antenna to buy and in which direction to point it, even uses your phone as a compass to point your antenna. It'll tell you which stations you'll get and their signal strength.
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=potkay.tvantennahelper.free&hl=en

    Reply
  • KeithV
    Microsoft is still missing the boat.

    If Microsoft really wanted the XBox to be more than a game console, they should have added Windows Media Center to Windows Home Server. Let XBox stream data from the home server to the TV. Heck, let the Home Server stream game content like Nvidia Gamestream to the XBox.

    I have a HTPC using Media Center and CableCard with a Home Server and can see the endless possibilities. Too bad Microsoft lost a bit of vision with those two products.
    Reply
  • gggplaya
    HDhomerun has the best solution for antenna people IMO. It's a network antenna tuner. Just connect it to an antenna, then connect it to your router and you've got tv on every smart tv or digital device in your house that can run DLNA. Also, it allows you to have the reciever as close to your antenna as possible and place your antenna higher in your home for better signal strength.
    Reply
  • PaulBags
    What kimd of antenna connector is that?? In my part of the world digital tv antennas use coaxial cables, there are no threads.
    Reply
  • burkhartmj
    15896516 said:
    Get a better antenna. I know many people in URBAN areas who use antennas and can get broadcast channels just fine using an antenna.

    Unless I spend over $100 there isn't a better antenna. Besides, I've had identical experiences with every antenna I've tried in every place I've lived. And I live in the middle of a city in an apartment, so indeed urban.

    And to everyone saying to get omnidirectional, I've never had anything else BUT omnidirectional. I'm not here for support, I know what I'm doing, it just doesn't work in my area.
    Reply