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FCC: Nintendo Switch Doesn't Have A Removable Battery

Don't plan to buy a bunch of rechargeable batteries for Nintendo's upcoming Switch console. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) said a production prototype of the device "equivalent to mass-produced items" that it examined in August had a built-in battery that "the user can't remove" on their own.

Nintendo could modify the Switch's design before its 2017 launch, but if the prototype submitted to the FCC is the same as the final product, anyone hoping to use the Switch primarily as a handheld gaming console will have to get used to the idea of carrying the device's charger around with them. That's unfortunate; the whole point of the Switch is to allow people to experience their favorite games while lounging in front of the TV and on the go.

Creating the console without a removable battery is also a departure from Nintendo's recent design choices. Both the 3DS and the Wii U GamePad--the tablet-like controller at the center of the company's unpopular home console--allow their owners to pull out their batteries if they wish. Nintendo even provides step-by-step guides for removing batteries from both products on its support website; it didn't try to keep this option hidden from consumers.

It's not hard to guess at why the company designed the 3DS and Wii U GamePad this way. Both are unique gaming devices that have plenty to offer, and the most glaring problem with both is their battery life. It's never fun to die in the water temple in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time 3D because the 3DS gave out, or to send a Wii U in to Nintendo because the GamePad no longer holds a charge, and a removable battery solves both issues.

All of the above makes the omission of a removable battery in the Switch even more baffling. Nintendo's pitched it as a mix between a home console and a handheld gaming device. Docking it to play on a TV shouldn't pose a problem, but picking up the device to play a marathon The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild session on a plane or engage in some Mario-style platforming that's a little more complex than the mobile Super Mario Run makes battery life vital.

There's still time for Nintendo to change the Switch's design before its anticipated March 2017 debut. We'll learn more about the console when the media is allowed to go hands-on starting in January.

  • rayden54
    The more I hear, the less interested I am. tbh, they just about lost me at tablet. It's why I didn't buy the Wii U. I don't want a freaking tablet, I want a freaking console.
    Reply
  • Rogue Leader
    Great, Nintendo joins in on planned obsolescence.

    Until the battery technology is developed that prevents well used devices from having batteries that work about half as well in 2 years, all these companies are saying to you (including cellphone companies) is we want to squeeze you for $500 again in 2 years, or we care more about aesthetics and making a device "look cool" than properly servicing our customers.
    Reply
  • coolitic
    Does the FCC have the right to announce such things? And for what purpose?
    Reply
  • skit75
    I get a permissions error when trying to access the Source link.
    Reply
  • Rogue Leader
    19066056 said:
    Does the FCC have the right to announce such things? And for what purpose?

    The FCC didn't announce anything. Instead for it to be sold here in the US the device needed to be submitted to the FCC for review and approval, which it received and subsequently they release the review of the device, which is public record.
    Reply
  • RomeoReject
    "The more I hear, the less interested I am. tbh, they just about lost me at tablet. It's why I didn't buy the Wii U. I don't want a freaking tablet, I want a freaking console."
    I'm completely the opposite. I already have a home gaming device (My PC) which means the Switch only needs to either:
    -Have games that are worth owning it for
    -Have portability my PC lacks

    So for me, it ticks both boxes.
    Reply
  • eyencee
    It's quite possible that the two controllers that attach to it in wireless mode also serve as additional power sources like power packs according to the battery life specs the length would support my theory just saying
    Reply
  • pmerritt
    They may have a chargeable power brick in mind for gaming on the go.....just as many phones do. If you don't mind carrying batteries then why would you mind carrying a power brick? Think OUTSIDE the box peeps!
    Reply
  • TEAMSWITCHER
    19065535 said:
    The more I hear, the less interested I am. tbh, they just about lost me at tablet. It's why I didn't buy the Wii U. I don't want a freaking tablet, I want a freaking console.

    I was desperately hoping for a Nintendo Game pad without the "Console" part. Requiring only a dongle that attached to your HDTV to receive the video signal. Having a box that I have to dock the game pad to is a MASSIVE STEP BACKWARDS from the two screen gaming experience that has been a Nintendo Hallmark with the Wii U and 3DS. I just don't see the appeal of the "DOCK" .... it's asinine.
    Reply
  • wifiburger
    this product is just stupid, market said no thanks to that garbage wii u tablet and what does nintendo do, brings another tablet gaming device !
    Reply