Hard drive destroyer vibrates hard drives to death in 90 seconds — DiskMantler then spits out the individual components for recycling

The DiskMantler, dramatically shown in promotional video by Garner.
(Image credit: Garner Products)

Data elimination company Garner seeks to make disassembling HDDs easier, faster, and more exciting with its new product, the DiskMantler. By intensely shaking a hard drive, the device promises to fully separate all of the individual components that make up a spinning disk drive in 90 seconds or less.

Garner's helpful and dramatic video shows that their DiskMantler is an effortless user experience. Insert a hard drive like a VHS tape into the input slot, turn the timer for anywhere from 8 to 120 seconds (Garner estimates the process should take an average of 60 seconds, but each drive is different), and wait as your precious hard drive is violently vibrated to death. When complete, the machine will shoot your precious components out of its exit ramp and be immediately ready for its next victim, with no cooldown required.

(Image credit: Garner Products)

This process completely separates the platter, coils, green board, and all other components. It aims to be both a thorough dismantling process and a more eco-friendly solution than incineration or crushing, which are the industry standards for hard drive destruction. Incinerating a hard drive requires temperatures north of 670 degrees Celsius, leaves behind toxic chemicals, and destroys the rare-earth magnets inside, which become more critical by the day, an altogether costly process. Crushing or shredding a hard drive is likewise energy-intensive and not entirely secure; malicious agents can still recover the 0s and 1s left behind on shreds or scraps of hard drives.

The novel approach of vibrating a hard drive into rubble avoids the potential ecological damage of incinerating or crushing your drives by saving the components for better recycling and reuse. The rare-earth magnets inside a hard drive are of primary interest, as government and research sources are now calling rare-earth magnets "critical materials" for a cleaner energy transition. The PC board, platters, and other components inside are similarly desirable. Garner hopes that their method of shaking a drive to bits allows for better "responsible recycling" from their customers and users.

(Image credit: Garner Products)

But while this hopes to keep more e-waste off the world's shorelines, disassembling a hard drive to its base components is not a 100% secure way to clean up your data. If shredding a hard drive is not 100% data-safe, a fully intact vibrated data platter certainly will not be, either. To this end, Garner will soon offer their sister product, the DeMag, a "super degausser" tool that promises to both eliminate all data left behind on a hard drive platter and to "free" the rare-earth magnets so they don't come out of our DiskMantler a clumped-up mess. But suppose super-strong proprietary magnet solutions aren't your jam. In that case, there is always the time-intensive process of overwriting the data on your drive before subjecting it to the shake chamber, which we've previously written about here.

You'll love Garner's website for a more thorough breakdown of its fun new tool and how to get your hands on one. There is no hint of what Garner prices its DiskMantler at, but we get the suspicion that, in this case, if you have to ask, you can't afford it anyway. At the very least, you can rest assured that somewhere, someone is having the time of their life sliding drives into this silly vibrating contraption until none remain.

Freelance News Writer
  • Ralston18
    I am having a very serious April 1st reaction to this piece....
    Reply
  • Grobe
    I'm waiting until someone independent takes this piece for a test - on several types of harddrives to see if it lives up to expectations every time.
    And what about 2.5' disks (maybe not so relevant in a server park) ?
    Reply
  • LinuxDevice
    The next step is to build this with a magnetron or klystron pointing in to a resonant cavity within this shaker. And perhaps one of those hacker masks could be sold with this:
    images.google.com
    Reply
  • AndrewJacksonZA
    Ralston18 said:
    I am having a very serious April 1st reaction to this piece....
    Same.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Hard drive destroyer vibrates hard drives to death in 90 seconds

    Insert a hard drive like a VHS tape into the input slot, turn the timer for anywhere from 8 to 120 seconds (Garner estimates the process should take an average of 60 seconds, but each drive is different)

    Nice agreement there...It's a decent pre-cycler, separating the parts for the next processing step automatically, but how would it stack up against a person manually disassembling a drive with current tools? How many drives would it take to start generating a profit? My guess is the "If you have to ask, you can't afford it" price will keep this from selling any units.
    Reply
  • Notton
    This one looks like it does a cleaner job.

    The competition, like this one below, use a degausser to wipe data, and a hydraulic press to smash things to pieces.
    https://at-rack.co.uk/
    Reply
  • BX4096
    There's a much easier and cheaper HDD destroyer solution out there: buy Seagate.
    Reply
  • waltc3
    I actually think it's a good idea, especially for the magnets. Provided, of course, that it always works as described here--that's the rub, I think. Crushing and burning do seem a huge waste of energy. I feel sure that HDD manufacturers have their own solutions to these problems, however. You could take the platters and Frisbee them into the sea, or into separate trash bins, etc. ad infinitum. Zero-ing out formatting, pre component separation, will also clobber the data, but it takes a while, as I repaired an old platter drive once of a SMART error that way and found out...;) (I read several articles that said it wouldn't work, but it did, and years later it's still running fine, no errors.)
    Reply
  • Amdlova
    machine after 100 drives will be dead as fuuuu
    Reply
  • JeffreyP55
    Admin said:
    This new drive destruction tool vibrates HDDs into their parts in 8 to 90 seconds.

    Hard drive destroyer vibrates hard drives to death in 90 seconds — DiskMantler then spits out the individual components : Read more
    I made a degausser years ago to degauss CRT's. I believe they are capable of destroy HDD data, tapes etc.
    Shake and bake of magnetic field? You decide....
    Reply