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Lenovo Recalls ThinkCentre Desktops Due to Fire Hazard

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has issued a voluntary recall of Lenovo's all-in-one ThinkCentre M70z and M90z computers.

According to the alert, the recall affects around 50,500 units that were sold between May 2010 and January 2012. Consumers who purchased one of these AIOs in that timeframe are requested to check the serial number on their computer with Lenovo to determine if it is subject to this recall. The desktop model numbers along with the serial number and manufacturing date code (see below) can be found on a label on the underside of the unit.

"The recalled all-in-one desktop computers, or PCs, are flat-panel monitors with the PC integrated into the monitor housing itself," the statement describes. "The power supplies are also inside the monitor or PC housing. The computer chassis has a matte black finish with the brand name 'ThinkCentre' in the lower left hand corner of the monitor front."

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The recall is the result of a defect in an internal component of the power supply which can overheat and pose a fire hazard. Consumers possibly owning one of these defective computers are requested to shut down the machine and unplug it from the wall immediately. The firm said it received reports of one fire incident and one smoke incident in the U.S., but so far no injuries have been reported.

The firm states that consumers who have determined that their AIO PC fits within the recall should contact Lenovo immediately to schedule an appointment for a free replacement of the power supply. Lenovo can be contacted at (855) 248-2194 anytime, or visit the firm's website at www.lenovo.com/aiopsurecall.

"The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is still interested in receiving incident or injury reports that are either directly related to this product recall or involve a different hazard with the same product," the firm states. "Please tell us about your experience with the product on SaferProducts.gov."

Models
M70z and M90z

Date Codes
1001 to 1012
1101 to 1112
001 to 012
101 to 112

  • AznCracker
    Man, and I thought it was a hot deal.
    Reply
  • memadmax
    This country is so sue happy that when something isn't made perfectly(which is the case with everything, because nothing is perfect, and will eventually break) someone makes big bucks exploiting even a minor glitch......
    Reply
  • ScrewySqrl
    this is why I build my own

    EVERY major manufacturer skimps on power supplies, this is the innevitable result
    Reply
  • amdfangirl
    I like how it's a voluntary recall.
    Reply
  • bloc97
    ... the power supply which can overheat and pose a fire hazard...
    This is what happens when you play Crysis on Lenovo ThinkCentres...

    Consumers possibly owning one of these defective computers are requested to shut down the machine and unplug it from the wall immediately.
    No need... Just un-install Crysis and you'll be fine... :)
    Reply
  • bloc97
    ScrewySqrlthis is why I build my ownEVERY major manufacturer skimps on power supplies, this is the innevitable result
    Agreed... But FSP PSU's aren't that bad...
    Reply
  • rorouni
    think center is not the model intended for gaming,, dont like integrated mobo.. much better to build our own..
    Reply
  • alidan
    explodeing psus are a fire hazard? why arent all manufactures who skimp on them being recalled to?
    Reply
  • nebun
    leave it to the Mexicans to phuck it up....they are already phucking the states along the US border
    Reply
  • Partizan92
    I think Lenovo should blame Delta Electronics who has been the maker of PSU's for Lenovo... but only if the supply the internal parts for the PSU
    Reply