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G.Skill Outs Trident Z, Ripjaws V DDR4 Memory Kits For Next-Gen Intel Hardware

With the next generation of Intel's CPUs around the corner, G.Skill decided to jump the gun and announce its new DDR4 memory kits that you'll be able to pair with them. Meet the Trident Z and Ripjaws V memory modules.

The Trident Z is the high-end memory from G.Skill, and the new modules come with a very stylish sleek cooler. They'll range from DDR4-2800 MHz speeds through DDR4-4000 MHz, and are all built using Samsung memory chips. They also come with XMP support and will therefore be very easy to install and set up in your BIOS.

The Ripjaws V memory modules work on a lower tier, although many of the modules share the same hardware as the Trident Z. They come with a new Ripjaws cooler design, which is a little less aggressive than that of older models. Frequencies will range from DDR4-2133 MHz through DDR4-3733 MHz.

A heap of different capacities, timings and kits will be available. Module capacities include 4 GB, 8 GB, and 16 GB, with kit capacities ranging from 8 GB through 64 GB with varying numbers of modules. The lower frequency modules run at 1.2 V, while the speedier units will need 1.35 V to maintain good timings at higher frequencies. The 4000 MHz Trident Z modules may even need to hop over the DDR4 specification and sip 1.4 V to perform optimally.

G.Skill did not provide information for the timings of all the modules, but did mention that the 3600 MHz modules will run at 17-18-18-38; the 3733s will run at 17-19-19-39; the 3800s at 18-20-20-38; and the 4000s will run at 19-25-25-45.

Last, but not least, it should be noted that the 4000 MHz Trident Z kit is the first retail 4000 MHz memory kit, according to G.Skill.

G.Skill did not specify prices or shipping dates, but of course, prices will range from reasonable for the reasonable speeds to unreasonable for the top-end 4000 MHz modules, as they always do.

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  • danlw
    So just to be sure, will currently available DDR4 kits work with Skylake, or will Skylake require special "Skylake Compatible" DDR4 memory? The title of the article suggests you need a certain type of DDR4.

    I plan to start a Skylake build once the processors become available, but don't want to get surprised if I get the "wrong" DDR4 memory.
    Reply
  • tom10167
    So just to be sure, will currently available DDR4 kits work with Skylake, or will Skylake require special "Skylake Compatible" DDR4 memory? The title of the article suggests you need a certain type of DDR4.

    I plan to start a Skylake build once the processors become available, but don't want to get surprised if I get the "wrong" DDR4 memory.

    It's all marketing crap, like "Windows 8.1 certified" PSUs and whatever else. Skylake will take whatever DDR4 you can throw it at it, no need to spend $15/GB on TRIDENT Z MEMORY
    Reply
  • Blueberries
    So just to be sure, will currently available DDR4 kits work with Skylake, or will Skylake require special "Skylake Compatible" DDR4 memory? The title of the article suggests you need a certain type of DDR4.

    I plan to start a Skylake build once the processors become available, but don't want to get surprised if I get the "wrong" DDR4 memory.

    It's all marketing crap, like "Windows 8.1 certified" PSUs and whatever else. Skylake will take whatever DDR4 you can throw it at it, no need to spend $15/GB on TRIDENT Z MEMORY

    No need...other than those heatsinks, damn!
    Reply
  • Xivilain
    I'm digging the non-symmetric look of the TridentZ.

    Ripjaws4 was their first batch of DDR4 for the series, but now RipjawsV (five) is still DDR4 ? Shouldn't they have waited for DDR5 or newer architecture first, and just called these Ripjaws4.2 or something? Food for thought.
    Reply
  • plasmastorm
    Well if ddr4 starts at 2133mhz there's little incentive for me to upgrade from ddr3 ripjaws i already have running at 2133 :-/
    Reply
  • JPNpower
    I'm digging the non-symmetric look of the TridentZ.

    Ripjaws4 was their first batch of DDR4 for the series, but now RipjawsV (five) is still DDR4 ? Shouldn't they have waited for DDR5 or newer architecture first, and just called these Ripjaws4.2 or something? Food for thought.


    Ripjaws V not 5. Just like Ripjaws X wasn't 10. Also food for thought, I hate the name, and to a lesser extent, the look of Ripjaws memory. I think nongamers like me along with nonviolent gamers will agree. G.Skill might want to think of people like us, since we still love high performance.
    Reply
  • James Mason
    Loving the look of those sticks, too bad DDR4 is still far away from mainstream.
    Reply
  • alidan
    Loving the look of those sticks, too bad DDR4 is still far away from mainstream.

    its not really, the price premium on 16gb i believe is between 20 and 30$ of ddr3, at least for me thats not a big enough gap to worry about when building a full system.
    Reply
  • James Mason
    16351479 said:
    Loving the look of those sticks, too bad DDR4 is still far away from mainstream.

    its not really, the price premium on 16gb i believe is between 20 and 30$ of ddr3, at least for me thats not a big enough gap to worry about when building a full system.

    Building a DDR4 system is costly part, not the ram.
    Reply
  • Lutfij
    Hmmm, they finally decided to launch the kit after Computex. We are yet to see if they opted for a dual sided/color approach as the Computex video did state G.Skill were testing the waters to see if people liked the dual colored brushed aluminium finish.

    No doubt they will look awesome on an itx board or in an X99 system!
    Reply