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Steam for Linux Enters Internal Beta in October

By - Source: Valve | B 29 comments
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Valve will let 1,000 lucky Linux users test out its Steam platform sometime in October.

After keeping Linux users waiting for many, many years, Valve finally announced it would release a Linux-based Steam earlier this year.

According to earlier reports, Steam of Linux has been a work in progress for quite some time, but it wasn't until Gabe Newell became personally involved that things really began to lift off. And lift off they did, just four months after the announcement, Valve is about ready to launch its internal beta testing.

The company posted in its blog on Wednesday, stating its internal beta testing will begin next week. Additionally, the company will also invite a very small number of people for further testing later on in the month.

Valve says it will bring 1,000 people in for the testing in October, which is set to involve Steam, one Steam game and support for Ubuntu 12.04 and later. Despite the quick beta testing, it seems as though Valve still has a bit of work to do, since the upcoming beta won't feature Big Picture Mode or additional Steam titles.

The company didn't explicitly say which game will be featured in the test, but reports indicate the company has already been using Left 4 Dead 2 for internal testing. No sign-up is available at the moment, but Valve says it will have a beta sign-up form coming soon. Additionally, the company also suggests new Linux users sit this beta out, because it's looking for more experienced Linux users.

 

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Top Comments
  • 14 Hide
    john_4 , September 28, 2012 2:16 PM
    There is already a growing list for OS X, soon to be OS X/Linux. The time of the proprietary Direct X and M$ is coming to an end.
Other Comments
  • 5 Hide
    cmcghee358 , September 28, 2012 12:24 PM
    "Like"

  • -6 Hide
    Thunderfox , September 28, 2012 12:42 PM
    So Steam for Linux will be carrying all of the modern OpenGL games out there. You know, like... um.... that one... and the other one...
  • Display all 29 comments.
  • 6 Hide
    godfather666 , September 28, 2012 1:01 PM
    Yay for Doom 3!
  • 0 Hide
    samkl , September 28, 2012 1:04 PM
    Steam is a variation of a cloud service. Cross platform cloud services make it easier for consumers to switch because they aren't locked into an ecosystem. Kudos to Valve!
    -SK
  • 2 Hide
    john_4 , September 28, 2012 2:06 PM
    Yeeessss, Nice.
  • 9 Hide
    john_4 , September 28, 2012 2:06 PM
    ThunderfoxSo Steam for Linux will be carrying all of the modern OpenGL games out there. You know, like... um.... that one... and the other one...

    Any that run on Mac will run on STEAM you MS fanboy.
  • 14 Hide
    john_4 , September 28, 2012 2:16 PM
    There is already a growing list for OS X, soon to be OS X/Linux. The time of the proprietary Direct X and M$ is coming to an end.
  • -3 Hide
    azraa , September 28, 2012 2:40 PM
    We need better drivers for it to happen!
    More compatibility, something like DirectX does
    OpenCL is really good, I know, but it lacks, a lot, in certain key aspects in modern mainstream titles.
    The day Linux can partner with AMD/ATI and nVidia (I hardly think so after that F-Bomb xD) to create such a software accelerator, that will be the golden era of gaming
  • 1 Hide
    booyaah , September 28, 2012 3:15 PM
    samklSteam is a variation of a cloud service. Cross platform cloud services make it easier for consumers to switch because they aren't locked into an ecosystem. Kudos to Valve!-SK


    Aren't locked in? If something happens to Steam and they go under or get bought out *EA* you may find your self unable to play the games you already paid for. I always prefer to use a full download not tied to steam for any game over $5.
  • 6 Hide
    captainblacko , September 28, 2012 3:20 PM
    the question is can Linus beat Gabe at HL death match....
  • -3 Hide
    Anonymous , September 28, 2012 4:15 PM
    Too bad gpu drivers for linux are on the worst stage at this moment...even the native ones have subpar performance.
  • 5 Hide
    edogawa , September 28, 2012 4:22 PM
    People will still continue to use Windows 7 for quite some time like XP, but I can't see Linux becoming anywhere near as big as Windows is for gaming, at least not for years. Windows 9 will likely be a much better improvement of Metro, hopefully.

    Linux is great and all, but for normal desktop use, it will never be good for consumers, it's to much work to get things installed and so many different flavors; it's just simply not user friendly and simple as Windows.
  • 0 Hide
    xrodney , September 28, 2012 4:24 PM
    Day Steam manage to port most of games I play to Linux is day i will give M$ big goodbye.
    Most of applications I am using is already available also for Linux and few that don't, have good alternatives.
  • 3 Hide
    blackened144 , September 28, 2012 4:29 PM
    ThunderfoxSo Steam for Linux will be carrying all of the modern OpenGL games out there. You know, like... um.... that one... and the other one...


    Reminds me of this..


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sz5Fc8k4M50

  • 1 Hide
    xrodney , September 28, 2012 4:29 PM
    edogawaPeople will still continue to use Windows 7 for quite some time like XP, but I can't see Linux becoming anywhere near as big as Windows is for gaming, at least not for years. Windows 9 will likely be a much better improvement of Metro, hopefully. Linux is great and all, but for normal desktop use, it will never be good for consumers, it's to much work to get things installed and so many different flavors; it's just simply not user friendly and simple as Windows.

    That depend what you are trying to install and what distro are you using.
    There are distros that are only for experts and hardcore users, but you can also find distro that looks similar to windows and you can install it just by clicking on NEXT.
    As long as you are using installation packages you are fine. Its only when you are using source code and need to compile stuff when things can easily get out of hand.
  • 0 Hide
    Andy Chow , September 28, 2012 4:36 PM
    Great! Maybe I'll start playing games again.
  • 0 Hide
    digitalvampire , September 28, 2012 7:20 PM
    Quote:
    Additionally, the company also suggests new Linux users sit this beta out, because it's looking for more experienced Linux users.


    I'd say this is a catch-22. It's being packaged for Ubuntu, but Valve is looking for more experienced Linux users, who, of course, don't use Ubuntu. ;-)
  • 5 Hide
    edogawa , September 28, 2012 7:21 PM
    xrodneyThat depend what you are trying to install and what distro are you using.There are distros that are only for experts and hardcore users, but you can also find distro that looks similar to windows and you can install it just by clicking on NEXT.As long as you are using installation packages you are fine. Its only when you are using source code and need to compile stuff when things can easily get out of hand.


    Yeah, I've tried and used lots of distros, but even Ubuntu just isn't consumer freindly enough for the average person. Linux just doesn't offer enough stuff to make it worth switching to when Windows offers so much more.
  • 0 Hide
    Vladislaus , September 28, 2012 7:42 PM
    edogawaLinux is great and all, but for normal desktop use, it will never be good for consumers, it's to much work to get things installed and so many different flavors; it's just simply not user friendly and simple as Windows.

    Installing Windows isn't too much work for most consumers because almost everyone uses computers built by OEMs like ASUS, HP,... and they come loaded with a pre-installation image. For most users searching for drivers is completely out of their capacity.
    Certain software is difficult to install in linux because you have to compile it, specially if you're using a relatively unknown distro. But if you use a distro like Ubuntu/Mint most software is available through software sources, meaning that tons of software is available through a few clicks. Those that aren't available there are available through deb packages, and one can install it with simple double click. In those distros the software that must be compiled is almost non existent.

    Also there won't be that much flavors for Steam since they said they only support Ubuntu 12.04 onwards.

    It's not user friendly or easy as Windows because most people go to Linux expecting it to be identical to Windows.
  • 0 Hide
    digitalvampire , September 28, 2012 8:05 PM
    Quote:
    Also there won't be that much flavors for Steam since they said they only support Ubuntu 12.04 onwards.


    Valve will SUPPORT Steam for Ubuntu, but that does not mean that it will not work for other distributions (unless Valve goes out of their way to prevent this). I can guarantee that there will be builds/packages for every major Linux distribution within the first week of release.
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