AMD Announces Three New Embedded SKUs With Jaguar+ And Excavator Cores

AMD announced three new SKUs in its embedded solutions G-Series product line up that will use either Jaguar+ or Excavator CPU cores.

On the low-end of the product stack is the AMD G-Series LX SoC. It is designed using two Jaguar+ cores and a single AMD Radeon GCN compute unit. The LX SoC will replace AMD’s G-Series eKabini SoC, which uses the less efficient Jaguar core architecture, as the lowest performance and most energy efficient product offered by AMD as an embedded solution. The LX SoC’s power consumption scales between 6 and 15 W and is intended for use for a minimum of 10 years.

The LX SoC will be available in the FT3 package and is pin-compatible with AMD’s existing eKabini and Steppe Eagle SoCs in order to help accelerate production of devices using the LX SoC.

New AMD G-Series Embedded Product Offerings
Product NameLXJ-FamilyI-Family
CPU2 “Jaguar” x86 CoresUp to 2 “Excavator” x86 CoresUp to 2 “Excavator” x86 Cores
GPU1 x AMD Compute Unit (64 Shaders, 4 TMUs, 1 ROP)2 x AMD Compute Units (128 Shaders, 8 TMUs, 2 ROPs)4 x AMD Compute Units (256 Shaders, 8 TMUs, 4 ROPs)
Decode SupportMulti-Format Encode/Decode4K x 2K H.265 10-bit Decode & Multi-Format Encode/Decode4K x 2K H.265 10-bit Decode & Multi-Format Encode/Decode
Display Connection SupportHDMI 2.0, DP 1.2, eDP 1.4HDMI 2.0, DP 1.2, eDP 1.4HDMI 2.0, DP 1.2, eDP 1.4
TDP6-15 W6-10 W12-15 W
Memory SupportSingle-Channel DDR3Up To Two Channels DDR4/DDR3Up To Two Channels DDR4/DDR3
Integrated AMD Secure ProcessorYesYesYes
Planned Longevity10-Years10-Years10-Years

AMD also announced the I-Family and J-Family of SoCs, targeting end users that need less performance than its top of the line R-Series SoCs but more performance than other G-Series products offer. The I-Family and J-Family use the more modern FP4 package already used by the R-Series products. This should make it easy for OEMs to expedite product development with the I-Family and J-Family of SKUs using system boards originally designed for the R-Series products.

The J-Family is the more efficient of the two groups, offering two Excavator cores, two GCN compute units, and power consumption between 6 and 10 W. The I-Family also features two Excavator cores but doubles the number of GCN compute units to four. Because of the additional hardware, the I-Family products also carry a higher TDP, 12 and 15 W.

An advantage inherent in its I-Family and J-Family products is the ability to decode 10-bit H.265 content using GPU acceleration. AMD claimed that these are the first products on the market in an embedded profile that offer 10-bit H.265 decode. Both families also support DDR4 and DDR3 RAM and feature HDMI 2.0, DP 1.2 and eDP 1.4, enabling 4K video output at 60 Hz.

The initial batch of AMD G-Series J-Family and I-Family SoCs are available now, with additional product releases scheduled for the first and second quarter of this year. The G-Series LX products, however, won’t be available until March. There is no word on pricing at this time.

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  • Calculatron
    This is great.

    Meanwhile, they need to hurry up and get that Athlon X4 845 to market. I have tinkering to do!
    5
  • Wisecracker
    Quote:
    ... they need to hurry up and get that Athlon X4 845 to market
    It's been at retail for several weeks --- late to US, possibly here the 3rd week of March.

    Early tests look impressive for a cut-down chip. Bristol Ridge should be big fun with an unlocked chip. Benchies from FlanK3r at XS
    3
  • alextheblue
    Quote:
    Early tests look impressive for a cut-down chip. Bristol Ridge should be big fun with an unlocked chip. Benchies from FlanK3r at XS


    Thanks for the benches. However, the current Excavator design (Carrizo) was designed for power efficiency more so than high clocks. So unless they have reworked it substantially in secret, it probably won't be an impressive overclocker. We'll see. The IPC gains help a lot but it remains to see how much they affect games and other real-world applications.

    Either way, building an AM4 Excavator rig to tinker with is a lot more appealing than FM2+ at this point. Down the road you've got a nice upgrade path.
    1