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Toshiba Creates 128GB (64Gb NAND) Flash Chips

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 23 comments

Mmm... chips.

Smartphones and other mobile devices these days rely on flash storage rather than tiny hard drives. Notably, devices without expandable storage options, such as ones from Apple like the iPhone and iPad, differentiate themselves with their flash capacities.

In order to make tablets and smartphones with more than 32GB or 64GB of flash, memory makers need to make the chips. Toshiba has stepped up to the plate and revealed that it has made a 128GB embedded NAND flash memory module, the highest capacity yet achieved in the industry.

The new 128GB embedded device integrates sixteen 64Gbit (equal to 8GB) NAND chips fabricated with Toshiba's 32nm process technology and a dedicated controller into a small package 17 x 22 x 1.4mm.

Samples will be available in September, and mass production will start in the fourth quarter (October to December) of 2010.

Power Supply Voltage 2.7V to 3.6V (memory core);

1.65V to 1.95V / 2.7V to 3.6V (interface)

Bus width x1, x4, x8

Write Speed

21MB per sec. (Sequential/Interleave Mode)

21MB per sec. (Sequential/No Interleave Mode)

Read Speed

46MB per sec. (Sequential Mode/Interleave Mode)

55MB per sec. (Sequential/No Interleave Mode)

Temperature range -25degrees to +85degees Celsius

Package 153Ball FBGA (+84 support balls)

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Top Comments
  • 15 Hide
    back_by_demand , June 18, 2010 12:15 PM
    ^^^ +1000
    (as skin is peeling off and lungs burning)
    "Oh noez, my memory chips are failing!!!"
  • 13 Hide
    znegval , June 18, 2010 11:36 AM
    I can't believe people are bitching about it being 85C. If the chip is running hotter than that I wouldn't be worried about my equipment but about not dying of a heat stroke.
  • 11 Hide
    theroguex , June 18, 2010 8:02 AM
    Imagine writing 128GB data at 21MB/s....
Other Comments
    Display all 23 comments.
  • 2 Hide
    adam873873 , June 18, 2010 6:07 AM
    Amazing
  • 3 Hide
    anamaniac , June 18, 2010 6:11 AM
    Honestly, I'd rather a memory slot on all devices. 1GB of internal just to store the OS etc.
    Nothing like paying $100 more for only 16GB more of memory...
  • -8 Hide
    wintermint , June 18, 2010 6:28 AM
    "Temperature range -25degrees to +85degees Celsius"

    Uh.. won't that explode? o.O
  • 8 Hide
    back_by_demand , June 18, 2010 7:21 AM
    wintermint"Temperature range -25degrees to +85degees Celsius"Uh.. won't that explode? o.O

    That's the ambient temperature of the air where the device is to operate. The fact that the highest recorded temperature in the world was 57.8 °C means you are not worried about operating temps in hot places. Working in the Antarctic, that's a differant matter...

    Epic win for Toshiba, i'll give it 10 years and these chips will be rated in Tera, not Giga.
  • 0 Hide
    dEAne , June 18, 2010 7:38 AM
    This is good news.
  • 11 Hide
    theroguex , June 18, 2010 8:02 AM
    Imagine writing 128GB data at 21MB/s....
  • 0 Hide
    neiroatopelcc , June 18, 2010 8:41 AM
    back_by_demandThe fact that the highest recorded temperature in the world was 57.8 °C means you are not worried about operating temps in hot places.

    Last year the aircon failed in one of my server rooms. I measured air temperature in excess of 64C that day.
  • 7 Hide
    Tamz_msc , June 18, 2010 9:00 AM
    neiroatopelccLast year the aircon failed in one of my server rooms. I measured air temperature in excess of 64C that day.

    He meant under natural circumstances.
  • -1 Hide
    neiroatopelcc , June 18, 2010 9:29 AM
    A room heating up is natural if the aircon fails.
    Products aren't made only for perfect conditions - they're made with regard to certain risks. Thus 85C could actually become a problem in some situations - like being left in the windscreen of a black car on a sunny day with a 40C ambient temperature.

  • 2 Hide
    back_by_demand , June 18, 2010 9:58 AM
    neiroatopelccI measured air temperature in excess of 64C that day.

    Was it in excess by an additional 21 degrees?
    Don't worry, be happy
  • 13 Hide
    znegval , June 18, 2010 11:36 AM
    I can't believe people are bitching about it being 85C. If the chip is running hotter than that I wouldn't be worried about my equipment but about not dying of a heat stroke.
  • 15 Hide
    back_by_demand , June 18, 2010 12:15 PM
    ^^^ +1000
    (as skin is peeling off and lungs burning)
    "Oh noez, my memory chips are failing!!!"
  • 2 Hide
    hsetir , June 18, 2010 1:45 PM
    Though indeed practically it would never reach 85C, what you guys are missing that memory chips always operate higher than ambient temperature given no extra cooling. GPU rams are made for more than 100C and often reach about 90C. HDD's often reach 60C even if your ambience is at 30C.
  • 3 Hide
    zak_mckraken , June 18, 2010 3:26 PM
    -25° is nothing during our canadian winters, eh!

    Anyway, that's a small detail. Go progress!
  • 1 Hide
    zaznet , June 18, 2010 3:45 PM
    back_by_demand"Oh noez, my memory chips are failing!!!"


    No caption that under a picture of a cat on fire and it'd be perfect. :) 
  • 0 Hide
    flinxsl , June 18, 2010 3:51 PM
    -20C to +85C is industry standard "industrial" temperature range in the integrated circuit business. Their chip worked over a wider range of temperatures, so they specified it to target more markets than just mobile devices.
  • 0 Hide
    chickenhoagie , June 18, 2010 5:41 PM
    theroguexImagine writing 128GB data at 21MB/s....

    kind of like installing duke nukem back in 98
  • 0 Hide
    Pyroflea , June 18, 2010 7:16 PM
    Relatively slow transfer rates, but that's a sacrifice that has to be made for massive amounts of storage. I think it's safe to assume that production costs are much too high for it to be viable at this point in time.
  • 0 Hide
    back_by_demand , June 18, 2010 9:00 PM
    PyrofleaRelatively slow transfer rates, but that's a sacrifice that has to be made for massive amounts of storage. I think it's safe to assume that production costs are much too high for it to be viable at this point in time.

    Well, if I am reading this right
    Quote:
    128GB embedded device integrates sixteen 64Gbit (equal to 8GB) NAND chips

    So assuming that they work in tandem and data is written between all 16 chips the same way RAID does, then can I assume the 21MB / 46MB can be times by 16 to 336MB / 736MB.
    Obviously it doesn't scale up exactly so how much do I take off for overheads to get the same speeds as top end SSDs?
  • 0 Hide
    ordcestus , June 18, 2010 10:10 PM
    well more advanced tech is always good but i know i won't use 128 gb in my cellphone
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