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UK Teen Buys Photo of Xbox One on Ebay for £450

By - Source: Nottingham Post | B 36 comments

Scammed on an Xbox One photo.

Xbox One eBay Scam

Ahh, eBay. The Nottingham Post on Thursday morning reported that 19-year-old Peter Clatworthy had received a photo of an Xbox One Day One Edition console having bid £450 for what he thought was the actual console. The console was supposed to be a surprise for his four-year-old son.

"I always buy stuff on eBay and this had never happened before," said Clatworthy.

Though there have been plenty of Xbox One scams floating around the internet (one being folks selling empty Xbox One boxes as though they were actual consoles) the posting actually made it clear that it was a photo of the Day One Edition that was on sale. Clatworthy says it was in the consoles and video games section and that he noticed that the posting said 'photo' but went ahead with the purchase because of the item's description and positive seller feedback.

eBay told the Nottingham Post that it doesn't allow misleading posts and would take action against the seller. As such, Clatworthy is getting his money back thanks to eBay's money-back guarantee and the fact that he paid through PayPal. An update to the story, again on the Nottingham Post, states that the seller has been banned from doing business on eBay and that Clatworthy has gotten his money back.

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Top Comments
  • 26 Hide
    dragonfang18 , December 5, 2013 11:05 PM
    Why would you buy an Xbox One for a 4 year old? Are you sure it wasnt for himself?
  • 24 Hide
    Firion87 , December 6, 2013 1:46 AM
    No no no people. "Read" the article! He's 19 and has a 4 year old son. So he was 14 when he made that child... Doesn't seem too bright to me. How old was the kids mom????
  • 18 Hide
    Lord_Kitty , December 6, 2013 3:03 AM
    Wait... so he's 19 and has a 4 year old son?
Other Comments
    Display all 36 comments.
  • -9 Hide
    shardey , December 5, 2013 10:57 PM
    Completely his fault and if it was stated then the seller shouldn't have gotten banned. Hmm 12 years ago I was scammed $493 to the penny on a laptop from eBay before Paypal and the buyer's protection was around.
  • 4 Hide
    Zac Lloyd-Jones , December 5, 2013 10:57 PM
    He supports Nottingham Forrest, clearly retarded.
  • 26 Hide
    dragonfang18 , December 5, 2013 11:05 PM
    Why would you buy an Xbox One for a 4 year old? Are you sure it wasnt for himself?
  • -9 Hide
    dragonfang18 , December 5, 2013 11:05 PM
    Why would you buy an Xbox One for a 4 year old? Are you sure it wasnt for himself?
  • 4 Hide
    mrmez , December 5, 2013 11:17 PM
    LOLz.
    Fools and their money...
    So true.
  • 24 Hide
    Firion87 , December 6, 2013 1:46 AM
    No no no people. "Read" the article! He's 19 and has a 4 year old son. So he was 14 when he made that child... Doesn't seem too bright to me. How old was the kids mom????
  • 1 Hide
    Shaun o , December 6, 2013 2:46 AM
    I never get this, when you take out a bank loan or buy anything.
    You always should take the time to read the terms and conditions.
    If you fail to do this then in large part it is your own fault.

    If the E-bay add clearly stated it was only for a picture, then the fault is with the person who failed to understand what was on offer.

    Like everything in life check and double check.
    These days it does not surprise me though.
    Almost half the people who buy laptops ect, fail to even bother to read a manual that is provided with important information on how to recover it if things go wrong ect.

    Instead they chuck it in a corner and not bother reading it only to ask how to do it on Toms hardware forums.

    That shows a point in the same respect.

  • 18 Hide
    Lord_Kitty , December 6, 2013 3:03 AM
    Wait... so he's 19 and has a 4 year old son?
  • 0 Hide
    billgatez , December 6, 2013 3:43 AM
    I rember this happening to some guy buying a Wii-U.
  • 0 Hide
    neiroatopelcc , December 6, 2013 3:48 AM
    I'm glad to see ebay's improved! I stopped using it for years after being cheated on an item where ebay decided to side with the seller and even delete my negative feedback rating for his post (he didn't ship what was listed in the article) - instead I of a new item with receipt, got a broken 19" lcd monitor with no papers.
  • -2 Hide
    RupertJr , December 6, 2013 3:55 AM
    does he has some kind of brain problem/disease?
  • -1 Hide
    L0tus , December 6, 2013 3:59 AM
    Nottingham. Says it all really.
  • 5 Hide
    virtualban , December 6, 2013 4:00 AM
    @Lord_Kitty
    Glad at least someone caught it.
    For someone being a dad at 15, and impregnating a lady at 14, I would say it is to be expected.
  • 7 Hide
    chrisso , December 6, 2013 4:02 AM
    He was willing to spend £450 on a console. Nuff said.
  • 3 Hide
    velocityg4 , December 6, 2013 4:49 AM
    Quote:
    I never get this, when you take out a bank loan or buy anything.
    You always should take the time to read the terms and conditions.
    If you fail to do this then in large part it is your own fault.

    If the E-bay add clearly stated it was only for a picture, then the fault is with the person who failed to understand what was on offer.

    Like everything in life check and double check.
    These days it does not surprise me though.
    Almost half the people who buy laptops ect, fail to even bother to read a manual that is provided with important information on how to recover it if things go wrong ect.

    Instead they chuck it in a corner and not bother reading it only to ask how to do it on Toms hardware forums.

    That shows a point in the same respect.



    Are you still using a 286? Computers haven't come with real manuals since the 80's.
  • 0 Hide
    g00fysmiley , December 6, 2013 5:02 AM
    don't get me wrong that ia s craptastic thing to do listing a phot of a console for tht much... but it said it was a photo and he was dumb enough to buy it. that isn't fraud on the sellers part it is stupidity on the buyers part. don't reward stupid, post the story abotu this idiot and he loses his money... should absolutely not get his money back if anything recover the money and give it to a charity that works to better educate the public becaue clearly this guy was nevr taught to read before you agree to something. or to stupid to have listened
  • 4 Hide
    Kewlx25 , December 6, 2013 5:03 AM
    I've seen Ebay auctions where in huge bold red print it said "THIS IS ONLY A PICTURE OF A PS3, NOT AND ACTUAL PS3, YOU WILL NOT RECEIVE A PS3, ONLY THIS PICTURE", and there were bids on it for more than the actual value of a PS3 at the time.
  • 0 Hide
    Shaun o , December 6, 2013 5:09 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    I never get this, when you take out a bank loan or buy anything.
    You always should take the time to read the terms and conditions.
    If you fail to do this then in large part it is your own fault.

    If the E-bay add clearly stated it was only for a picture, then the fault is with the person who failed to understand what was on offer.

    Like everything in life check and double check.
    These days it does not surprise me though.
    Almost half the people who buy laptops ect, fail to even bother to read a manual that is provided with important information on how to recover it if things go wrong ect.

    Instead they chuck it in a corner and not bother reading it only to ask how to do it on Toms hardware forums.

    That shows a point in the same respect.



    Are you still using a 286? Computers haven't come with real manuals since the 80's.


    My spectrum 48k did lol.

  • 2 Hide
    neiroatopelcc , December 6, 2013 5:16 AM
    I really don't understand why people these days tend to blame the victim instead of the offender. What's it matter how old he was when he had the kid? couple hundred years ago it was the norm to be married by the age of 15 ; and why's it okay to be scammed if you live in a certain area or if you're willing to pay extra for a special item? I really don't get it. In my book, the victim isn't to blame.

    Hell if someone had nicked my computer or my car while I was sleeping I'd still have felt victimized despite my front door being unlocked and the keys being left in the car (inside a barn, mind you, not in the middle of London or so). After all I wasn't the one who knowingly did something illigal.
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