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Prototype Core i9-13900K Raptor Lake Chip Blasts Off To 5.77GHz

Core i9
(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

@Benchleaks has surfaced a Geekbench 5 result of a prototype Raptor Lake i9-13900K boosting up to 5.77 GHz, and the chip has the benchmark scores to back up the high clock speeds: The 13900K's single-threaded results are 10% faster than the current-gen i9-12900K, and a full 47% faster in the multi-thread results.

The nearly-5.8 GHz result is impressive and a clear sign that Intel's Raptor Lake is almost ready for the production line to fend off AMD's Zen 4 Ryzen 7000. None of the other Raptor Lake samples we've covered touched 5.7 or 5.8 GHz, with the only exception being an i7 variant overclocked to 6 GHz.

The performance results speak for themselves, with the i9-13900K being a full 10% faster and a whopping 47% faster in the single and multi-threaded results compared to its predecessor. The multi-threaded score, in particular, was helped immensely by Intel doubling the number of E-cores on the 13900K over the previous-gen model. However, this also appears to be an engineering sample, so there could be even more untapped performance waiting to be unlocked by the development team.

This is also the start of a new clock-speed war that will emerge in the CPU industry after a long hiatus, with both Intel and AMD now confirmed to have chips running boost frequencies of 5.5 GHz or higher. So it's only a matter of time before each company starts fighting it out to see who can be the first to break the 6 GHz barrier.

It should also be a great time for hardware enthusiasts to jump back into the overclocking world and see how far they can push these chips. We've already seen one alleged engineering sample of the Core i7-13700K hit 6 GHz. So we wouldn't be surprised to see this frequency become commonplace among overclocking enthusiasts once these new chips come out -- as long as the "silicon lottery" is in their favor.

Raptor Lake does not have an official release date yet, but rumors report a Q4 2022 release for the new CPU generation, with a rumored release date of October 17th. AMD's Ryzen 7000 processors have already been confirmed for a release date of September 15th.

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Aaron Klotz
Aaron Klotz

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • -Fran-
    I wanna see power figures for those speeds. Same with AMD, mind you.

    With Alder Lake Intel got parity (if not a tad more efficient) on games and other lower threaded applications, but this increase in clocks make me think they'll go back a bit. Also, AMD went up in power, so I'm most curious how the two new gens will compare to the 5800X3D, as I think, for gamers at least, is the CPU to beat in lower threaded content (efficiency wise).

    Regards.
    Reply
  • CMcDVic
    I would like to know what the temp and cooling solutions will be like.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    -Fran- said:
    I wanna see power figures for those speeds. Same with AMD, mind you.

    With Alder Lake Intel got parity (if not a tad more efficient) on games and other lower threaded applications, but this increase in clocks make me think they'll go back a bit. Also, AMD went up in power, so I'm most curious how the two new gens will compare to the 5800X3D, as I think, for gamers at least, is the CPU to beat in lower threaded content (efficiency wise).

    Regards.
    May be 350W to get there. :rolleyes:

    Intel Core i9-13900K Raptor Lake CPU With 5.8 GHz Boost Clock, 350W "Unlimited Power Setting" Up To 67% Faster Than AMD Ryzen 9 5950X In Cinebench (wccftech.com)
    Reply
  • closs.sebastien
    if it's +1 Ghz but going with +150w of power consumption and heat, I don't call it a progress.
    Reply
  • TerryLaze
    closs.sebastien said:
    if it's +1 Ghz but going with +150w of power consumption and heat, I don't call it a progress.
    What do you call it then, if the previous gen got =0Mhz with +150W and this one gets +1Ghz with +150W.
    A chip being able to handle more power without breaking needs a lot of progress, just look at how long TSMC took to finally be able to make a chip that can handle high power.

    Also "unlimited" is not default it's automated overclocking, that's for the WCtech article.
    40% more power for 14% more multithread...that's a setting for overclockers to geek out over it's not something a common user would do for 24/7.
    The exact test configuration wasn't revealed but OneRaichu tested the chips with two profiles, one with the standard "Limited Power" and the other with the "Unlimited Power" setting. Using the first setting, the chip achieved a single-core score of 2290 points and a multi-core score of 35,693 points with a maximum power draw of 253W. The "Unlimited Power" setting removes all shackles & offers the full potential of the CPU. With the new profile, the Intel Core i9-13900K Raptor Lake CPU posted a single-core score of 2288 points which is the same as the first setting but it's the multi-thread CPU score that saw a huge boost. The Cinebench R23 multi-thread score jumped to 40,616 points, that's a 14% boost over the standard power profile.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    -Fran- said:
    I wanna see power figures for those speeds. Same with AMD, mind you.

    With Alder Lake Intel got parity (if not a tad more efficient) on games and other lower threaded applications, but this increase in clocks make me think they'll go back a bit. Also, AMD went up in power, so I'm most curious how the two new gens will compare to the 5800X3D, as I think, for gamers at least, is the CPU to beat in lower threaded content (efficiency wise).

    Regards.

    Same here! But one thing's for sure, Intel will be forced to keep power requirements within the general limits of Alder Lake, since these new processors will need to be compatible with current 600 series motherboards.

    But, when unlocking all the power limits, who knows. lol
    Reply