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Google Announces Android 4.3, Update Rolling Out Today

Google today announced a brand new Nexus 7 but what's new hardware if you don't have some new software to go with it? To that end, Google also unveiled the newest version of its Android operating system, Android 4.3. This upgrade isn't major in that Google is still calling it Jelly Bean but there are some changes worth noting.

The biggest is the introduction of restricted profiles. This feature will let you limit access to apps and content for certain user profiles on your device. This will allow you to enable parental controls for when you give your tablet to your kid but it'll also be important for retailers who want to use the tablets as point-of-sale systems or to display product information.

Android 4.3 also has support for Bluetooth Smart technology, and OpenGL ES 3.0. Devs will notice that integrating DRM into their own streaming protocols is easier thanks to a modular DRM framework, while apps will also now be able to access a built-in VP8 encoder from framework or native APIs for high-quality video capture. Apps will also be able to access and interact with the stream of status bar notifications as they are posted. 

The Nexus 7 is the first device to ship with Android 4.3, but the update is being rolled out to other Nexus users today.

  • Mike Friesen
    Don't you dare pull a xbone on me, google.
    Reply
  • Mike Friesen
    Double post. (Ignore please, it's not my fault)
    Reply
  • dgingeri
    Well, I know my phone (HTC One S) won't be getting updated...
    Reply
  • vmem
    11220657 said:
    Double post. (Ignore please, it's not my fault)

    Um, no. all they did is make it EASIER for devs to include DRM IF they choose to do so. if anything, this will see devs who were unwilling to get on the android boat (donno anyone...) hop on. Also, it'll make a big difference for Indie developers if they want to have DRM for whatever reason. DRM isn't all evil, and to many small-time devs it can be critical to their success. it's all about implementation. MS screwed it up with XB1, but in this case all google is offering is choice for devs
    Reply
  • Adrianime
    I just bought an ACER ICONIA a700. Does anybody know if any device can take this upgrade? Or can only certain devices?
    Reply
  • house70
    11221544 said:
    Good luck waiting months to get it...if at all.

    You still don't get it, even if it's been explained to everybody plenty of times.
    Google is only directly responsible for their own Nexus line, and their devices are getting the upgrade already.
    The other manufacturers are responsible for their own Android-BASED devices (in bold letters, so thick people can get it).
    Got it?
    Since you don't even comprehend the difference between a Nexus device and an Android-based phone, it would be futile to try to explain to you the difference between a closed OS and an open OS (one that is made available for free to other manufacturers to use as a BASE for their own OS).
    IF iOS were an open OS, and assuming that other manufacturers would bother to use that as a template to make some other iOS-based phones, it would be their direct responsibility to update their own phones when a new version comes out.

    Anyhow, my luck seems to be good, indeed, since my Nexus 10 is getting the update. Chew on that for a while, buddy.
    Reply
  • captaincharisma
    come on Google let us Nexus S owners have one more update :)
    Reply
  • inanition02
    @house70 - While I get your point, that's like saying that that if you wanted the latest Windows updates, you should buy a Surface...but too bad, you bought an Asus..or a homebuilt so you don't get it. Yes, technically those other devices are Android based instead of running a vanilla build, but they are close enough to run nearly every app, so they should be built in such a way as to allow the kernal upgrade (that's OOP fundamentals...)
    Reply
  • Poul Wrist
    11220932 said:
    Um, no. all they did is make it EASIER for devs to include DRM IF they choose to do so. if anything, this will see devs who were unwilling to get on the android boat (donno anyone...) hop on. Also, it'll make a big difference for Indie developers if they want to have DRM for whatever reason. DRM isn't all evil, and to many small-time devs it can be critical to their success. it's all about implementation. MS screwed it up with XB1, but in this case all google is offering is choice for devs

    Microsoft was basically just putting their own version of Steam on the Xbox. With some fancier stuff that Steam does not yet have. They were just bad at explaining that. And I guess consol rage nin general.
    Reply
  • house70
    11222625 said:
    @house70 - While I get your point, that's like saying that that if you wanted the latest Windows updates, you should buy a Surface...but too bad, you bought an Asus..or a homebuilt so you don't get it. Yes, technically those other devices are Android based instead of running a vanilla build, but they are close enough to run nearly every app, so they should be built in such a way as to allow the kernal upgrade (that's OOP fundamentals...)
    Not quite. The difference is, Windows (or any other closed OS) is provided by MS and the OEM can not modify it's code in any way, the customer gets support directly from MS for the OS and he/she paid a pretty penny for it when bought the system. Android's base code is widely available online for free as AOSP for every OEM to use and modify/abuse any way they feel without any obligation towards Google (even the Google certification only means the device is compatible with G Play services, not that Google is responsible for the device); Google does not see a dime from the OEMs, and the OEMs have the AOSP framework and codebase at their disposal to modify as they wish. As a result, OEMs implement all kind of skinned solutions, proprietary code that often doesn't even see the light of day under open source rules (because it's not open) and Google can not know what it contains, let alone be responsible for it.
    All Google can do (and it already does) is release latest AOSP sources for everyone (including manufacturers) to use. By adding closed-sourced code to this, OEMs effectively turn into an Apple-like entity, controlling every aspect of the updating/servicing, etc. for their devices. Some are more successful than others.
    To use an analogy, Google provides the dough, but the OEM is responsible for the final pizza that they make. Windows provides the dough and the toppings, along with the instructions of how to make the pizza. Apple just makes the whole pizza without allowing anyone to use/license same ingredients and recipe.
    Reply